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The Parke County Covered Bridge Festivalâ„¢ on October 12th-21st, 2018

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Parke County Incorporated has a winter's end treat in store for you. Parke County Maple Syrup Producers begin tapping the trees that provide sugar water for making maple syrup. Join us for two weekends of fun February 24-25 & Mar 3-4. MAPLE FAIR HEADQUARTERS is located one mile north of Rockville, Indiana at 1472 N US 41 at the county's 4-H Fairgrounds. Everyone from 4-H Junior Leaders, Girl Scouts and Senior Citizens get in the act when it is pancake flippin' time. Pancakes with whole hog sausage and golden maple syrup are served daily from 8am to 4pm. Maple Syrup Producers at Smiley Sugar Camp, Sweetwater Farm, Meri-Arch Farms and Williams and Teague Sugar Camp invite you to visit them at the fairgrounds or at their camps. From primitive camps to the state of the art equipment, each camp gathers and boils sixty gallons of sugar water to make one gallon of golden maple syrup and each will explain their process. Maps and information are available at the headquarters that will lead you to the camps and the covered bridges of Parke County. In the 4-H Building is The Butcher Shop offering smoked ham, bacon, sausage as well as a variety of cheeses available for you to take some of the country flavor with you. Parke County Collectibles and other vendors are open daily. The commercial building behind the 4-H Building will offer a shopping delight for everyone after their meal! Plan on spending more than a day as Parke County has lots of things to see and do! Since 1972, the Parke Players have provided guests of the Maple Fair with great wholesome entertainment and this year is no different. Times, Dates, and production will be announced as the date draws closer. Tickets are $7.00 per person and are available at the Ritz Theatre Box Office. Call 765-569-5226 or email info@coveredbridges.com or visit www.coveredbridges.com for more information about planning your visit to Parke County, The Covered Bridge Capital of the World®.
<p>Reeder Park has two areas of play equipment, two pavilions, a public access site and handicapped-accessible restrooms. </p>
<p>Aztec Park has an area of playground equipment, tennis courts, a lighted basketball court, a pavilion, an array of baseball and softball fields around it and handicapped-accessible restrooms.</p>
Join into the delectable energy and Hoosier hospitality at the Rosedale Strawberry Festival in southwestern Parke County, Indiana. Admission is free. Indiana's best home baked shortcakes. Free concerts daily, crafters, KidZone, adult hobby show. Car, Truck and heap show, lots more. For more information: 812-236-3155, historicrosedale.com
Rockville Lake Park is a popular destination to take away stress of everyday life and enjoy an outdoor recreation experience! This 400 acre park operated by the Parke County Park & Recreation Board. The park features Rockville Lake, which is a 103 acre watershed that was built in 1972. The lake is one of the hottest fishing lakes in Indiana and offers the chance to catch bluegill, red-ear, crappie, bass, and catfish. A boat ramp, a 100 foot wheelchair accessible fishing pier, boat rentals, and several hundred feet of open shoreline is available for people of all ages and capabilities to cast into this astounding fishery! Rockville Lake Park offers primitive, modern, and full hook-up campsites with plenty of room to enjoy the favorite camp games. These sites are designed to accommodate any type of trailer and RV to ensure quality enjoyment for every visitor. Our primitive site selection gives you the option for moderately wooded sites or sites along the wood line in the grass. All of the campsites allow for plenty of room for the entire family! With a total of 157 campsites, there is plenty of room for you and the family to come out and enjoy the great outdoors. There are several horseshoe pits, two volleyball courts, a basketball court, nature trails, and three modern playgrounds located throughout the park. The park is an excellent place to see some of natures creatures!  
On the Parke County Courthouse Lawn in Rockville. Awards for cars, bikes,motorcycles and scooters. Registration fee per vehicle does apply. Street Dance, food and shopping on the town square. For more information call 765-344-8109 or visit www.mainstreetrockville.com
3 miles east of Raccoon Lake (11515 E US 36 Rockville) Native drumming, singing, dancing, storytelling, flutists. 20 + native craft vendors and food. Miami Living Village. Admission Charged. $5.00 Children 12 & Under Free. Free Parking Visit www.mnigathering.com
<p>This town park at the intersection of College and Pennsylvania Street in Rockville offers a public pool, sport fields, playground and the historic Chautauqua pavilion.</p>
1878 Barn, Collom's General Store. Antique and new quilts, unique wood items, live demonstrations. Antique tractors and riding mowers. No admission. For more information call: 765-548-2136 or visit bridgetonindiana.com
<p>4.065 acres with a 2,060 acre lake</p> <p>Archery Range, Basketball Courts, Volleyball, Boating / 5 Launch Ramps, Camping fees: 250 Class A Sites, 56 Class B Sites, 50 Class C Sites, Youth Tent Areas, Camp Store, Cultural Arts Programs, Dumping Station, Fishing / Ice Fishing, Fishing Pier (open when water level permits) Hiking Trails, Horseshoe Pits, Hunting / Limited, Interpretive / Recreational Programs, Picnicking / Shelter houses Reservable, Playground Equipment, Rental-Fishing Boats, Swimming / Beach Waterskiing.<br /> &nbsp;</p>
Join us for this living history re-enactment from 1750-1840! Learn about Indiana pioneers as you visit the early 1800's camp and talk to costumed re-enactors. See black powder muzzle loader shoots, knife and tomahawk throwing demos, canoe race on the creek, and hearth cooking at the 1822 Log Cabin. Activities for kids, plenty of food and free parking. Call 765-548-2136 for more info.
Over 2000 acres of timber that provide hiking and bridle trails with a swimming pool, Nature Center, shelter houses, primitive to modern campsites, tennis courts, with an excellent source to fishing and canoeing.  Nature abounds this beautiful park in the northern part of Parke County.    
There's fun for everyone in the family at the Mansfield Village Annual Mushroom Festival the last weekend of April. Come early and register for organized mushroom hunts and buy or sell mushrooms at the auction. Win a cash prize for the largest mushroom each day, regardless of where it was found. Visitors who join in the mushroom hunt can take home, not only a delicious meal, but also a hand carved mushroom take home, not only a delicious meal, but also a hand carved mushroom walking stick for those who find the largest and most mushrooms. Registration for the hunt is Saturday and Sunday from 8 until 10 AM at Fox's Overlook. Entry fee $8.00. Mushrooms will be sold throughout the day at the Mushroom Auction both Saturday and Sunday, with thousands of dollars changing hands from bidders and sellers from near and far. The Auction will be held at the Red barn. The Mansfield Village Car Show will be held Sunday only, with registration from 8 AM until Noon. Enjoy a free oldies concert under the Pavilion. Awards will be presented immediately following the concert. This is a great chance to show off your car while enjoying the Mushroom Festival. Every special event in Mansfield offers lots of shopping and great food. Mansfield shops will be open and vendors will be set up selling arts, crafts, antiques and flea market gems. Free tours will be given at the Historic Mansfield Roller Mill and for those who come to eat there's every kind of food imaginable. Mansfield is located in Parke County, Indiana, 6 miles south of US 36, just off the east side of SR 59 or 10 miles north of US 40. Mansfield is just north of Brazil on State Road 59. For more information about the Festival, call 765-653-4026. For more information visit www.mansfieldvillage.com
<p><strong>Built:</strong> 1913<br /> <strong>Builder:</strong> Joseph A. Britton <br /> <strong>Creek:</strong> Little Raccoon Creek <br /> <strong>Location: </strong>Located on State Sanatorium Grounds (now Lee Allen Bryant Nursing Home) on private property. Closed. <br /> <strong>Reference Code: </strong>#1,14-61 -38, 12-61-41, x-1, Adams 10-15N&mdash;7W Size: 154 ft long +8&rsquo; +8&rsquo;, 16 ft wide, 12&rsquo; 6<br /> <strong>Truss:</strong> Burr Arch 1 span<br /> <strong>Foundation: </strong>Concrete, Elbridge Bovde</p> <p><strong>Bridge History: </strong><br /> Morlan&rsquo;s Mill was built by Israel Morlan at the ford 3/4 mile east of Sand Creek Station. The building was a frame three story structure and the dam was a hollow frame. The water washed over into a sandy bed, washing out a basin 10 feet deep.</p> <p>The wheel was a turbine and there were wheat burrs, corn burrs, and a sash saw.</p> <p>There was a ford at Morlan&rsquo;s Mill located near the north border of the State Sanatorium. During high water, travelers could cross Little Raccoon on the Plank Road Covered Bridge, about a mile south.</p> <p>Though built near Morlan&rsquo;s Mill, the State Sanatorium Bridge was built for, associated with, and owned by the State Sanatorium.</p> <p>The 65th Indiana General Assembly approved establishment and financing of the State Tuberculosis Hospital or Sanatorium on March 8,1907. It was in full operation by the end of 1910. The sanatorium functioned as a city unto itself with a school, 3 doctors, 16 nurses, a dentist, electric and steam power plant, laundry, dairy, bakery, and chicken farm. In the era in which it was established, the best cure for tuberculosis was fresh air, rest, sunshine, and good food.</p> <p>This bridge was built to haul coal to the State Sanatorium from mines one or two miles away. The Sanatorium was heated by coal and the power plant was driven by coal. Prior to building this bridge, coal had to be hauled to Rockville and then out by State Road (now US 36) to cross the Plank Road Bridge, then onto the State Sanatorium grounds.</p> <p>Elbridge Boyde said he hauled the materials to make the approaches to the structure with his team of mules. His mule team was the first to cross the new structure.</p> <p>The Plank Road Bridge washed out in the 1913 flood. It was replaced by the Howard Bridge, also built by J.A. Britton, the same year.</p> <p>This bridge is the only one to have lightning rods. The bridge was on private property and had fallen to disrepair and was closed.&nbsp; In 2009 the bridge was moved to CR 100 N and is now open to traffic.</p>
Go to the 1878 House (The Miller's Home) and sample locally made wine while you check out the art. Beautiful decorations for your home. Contact the following for more information about the event. bton1878hse@aol.com or 765-548-2136 www.bridgetonindiana.com
<p><strong>Built: </strong>1856, moved 1960-61 <br /> <strong>Builder: </strong>Henry Wolf, moved by Elmer Buchta <br /> <strong>Creek: </strong>Big Raccoon Creek, moved to Little Racoon Creek <br /> <strong>Location:</strong> Located at Portland Mills, now covered by Lake Mansfield. <br /> <strong>Reference Code:</strong> #4, 14-61 -21,12-61 -23, kg, Union 1 -15N&mdash;6W moved to Greene 5-16N--6W <br /> <strong>Size: </strong>130 ft long +8&rsquo; +8&rsquo;, 16 ft wide, 13&rsquo; clearance <br /> <strong>Truss:</strong> Double Burr Arch 1 Span <br /> <strong>Foundation:</strong> Cut stone moved to poured concrete spanning earlier poured concrete for Dooley Station Bridge.</p> <p><strong>Repair/Restoration History:</strong> Floor, stringers and roof replaced by Thompson and Noble in 1909 Moved to Dooley Station (#3) site northeast of Guion in 1961. Bypassed by ford in stream and closed in 1982. Funds requested for rehabilitation in 1991.</p> <p><strong>Bridge History:</strong> Portland Mills was settled in 1821 by Samuel Steele. He worked at clearing the land for a farm until 1825 when he built a mill on Big Raccoon Creek. There was a grain mill with a water turbine and a sawmill. Later owners of the first mill were William Butcher, Jesse Thompson, and Wesley Holman. Wesley Holman built the second, three story high mill and obtained modern machinery for it. Later owners included Hirem Hocker, John Blake, Jacob Culver, James Williams, and a Mr. Williams. The dam had a solid sandstone foundation.</p> <p>Portland Mills was on an Indian trail that branched off of Tecumseh&rsquo;s Trail at Montezuma and led northeasterly out of Portland Mills to a large Indian town north of present day Roachdale. Some believe that the first white families came to Portland Mills on this trail, entering the county from the southwest and the Wabash River bottoms, rather than the more direct line from Virginia or Kentucky.</p> <p>Some of the first settlers were David Logan Cunningham in 1816, Moses Hart in 1820, Samuel Steele and son in 1821, and Alexander Harbison in 1830. One early settler stumbled over a rattlesnake so large he mistook it for a dead log. It was sluggish from a full belly. As he killed it, it disgorged a deer fawn. The rattlesnake was over eight feet long.</p> <p>This bridge was one of the earliest Parke County covered bridges and was used for preinduction troop training during the Civil War.</p> <p>The town of Portland Mills was to be covered with water as Lake Mansfield filled. The bridge was moved to replace the Dooley Station Bridge which was burned down in 1960. New abutments were poured so that the 130 foot long Portland Mills Bridge could be emplaced over the 73 foot span of Dooley Station. The movement was over 18 miles and was completed January, 1961.</p> <p>The bridge has deteriorated, sections of roof and siding are missing allowing in the damaging rain, and the northeast corner has been burned. The bridge was closed in 1982, when it was bypassed with a ford. In 1991 the bridge was in grave danger of collapse. Funds from a grant, several local organizations and donations allowed it to be restored to its original state in 1996.</p>
The is a great opportunity to shop or sell.<br /> <br /> To reserve a space call 765-569-7442 or 765-569-2605.<br /> www.mainstreetrockville.com
<p><strong>Driving the Black Route - 33 miles<br /> </strong></p> <p class="MsoBodyText4"><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:10.5pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US; mso-ligatures:none">Leave south side of Depot parking lot, turn right onto High Street. At the stop sign, turn left on Bridgeton Road. Continue south on Bridgeton Road. <o:p></o:p></span></p> <p class="MsoBodyText4"><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:10.5pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US; mso-ligatures:none">OPTION : If you would like to view </span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:10.5pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;font-weight:bold;language:en-US; mso-ansi-language:en-US;mso-ligatures:none">#12 Crooks Covered Bridge</span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:10.5pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US; mso-ligatures:none">, turn left onto Wimmer Road </span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:10.5pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;font-style:italic;language:en-US; mso-ansi-language:en-US;mso-ligatures:none">(Gravel)</span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:10.5pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US; mso-ligatures:none">. Turn around at the Covered Bridge and return to Bridgeton Road.<o:p></o:p></span></p> <p class="MsoBodyText4"><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:10.5pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US; mso-ligatures:none">Proceed south on Bridgeton Road. As you are traveling on Bridgeton Road, you will see </span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:10.5pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;font-weight:bold;language:en-US; mso-ansi-language:en-US;mso-ligatures:none">#11 McAllister Bridge </span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:10.5pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US; mso-ligatures:none">on your left on County Road 400S </span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:10.5pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;font-style:italic;language:en-US; mso-ansi-language:en-US;mso-ligatures:none">(Gravel)</span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:10.5pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US; mso-ligatures:none">. </span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:10.5pt; font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; font-style:italic;language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US;mso-ligatures:none">The route does not turn here, however you can visit the bridge and return to Bridgeton Road, turn to Bridgeton Road, turn left stop sign and continue to the Black Route. <o:p></o:p></span></p> <p class="MsoBodyText4"><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:10.5pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US; mso-ligatures:none">Next you will see </span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size: 10.5pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;font-weight:bold;language:en-US; mso-ansi-language:en-US;mso-ligatures:none">#10 Neet Bridge </span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:10.5pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US; mso-ligatures:none">on the left. Stay on Bridgeton Road and you will come into Bridgeton and see </span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:10.5pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;font-weight:bold;language:en-US; mso-ansi-language:en-US;mso-ligatures:none">#8 Bridgeton Bridge</span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:10.5pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US; mso-ligatures:none">. The Bridgeton Bridge was burned by arson in 2005, and the bridge that you see now was built in 2006.<o:p></o:p></span></p> <p class="MsoBodyText4"><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:10.5pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US; mso-ligatures:none">After crossing the concrete by-pass bridge in Bridgeton, turn left onto Hawkins Road. Turn left onto Mansfield Road. At stop sign at State Road 59, go across into&nbsp; Mansfield which is Mansfield/Mill Road.<o:p></o:p></span></p> <p class="MsoBodyText4"><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:10.5pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US; mso-ligatures:none">Turn right on Martin Road and go through </span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:10.5pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;font-weight:bold;language:en-US; mso-ansi-language:en-US;mso-ligatures:none">#5 Mansfield Bridge</span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:10.5pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US; mso-ligatures:none">. Turn right on 775E and then left onto 720S. See </span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:10.5pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;font-weight:bold;language:en-US; mso-ansi-language:en-US;mso-ligatures:none">#6 Big Rocky Fork Bridge </span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:10.5pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US; mso-ligatures:none">on left. Continue on 720S, then<o:p></o:p></span></p> <p class="MsoBodyText4"><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:10.5pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US; mso-ligatures:none">Turn left onto 1000E.<o:p></o:p></span></p> <p class="MsoBodyText4"><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:10.5pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US; mso-ligatures:none">Turn left onto Ferndale Road.<o:p></o:p></span></p> <p class="MsoBodyText4"><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:10.5pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US; mso-ligatures:none">Turn right onto State Road 59.<o:p></o:p></span></p> <p class="MsoBodyText4"><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:10.5pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US; mso-ligatures:none">Turn left onto New Discovery Road.<o:p></o:p></span></p> <p class="MsoBodyText4"><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:10.5pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US; mso-ligatures:none">Turn right onto Bridgeton Road.<o:p></o:p></span></p> <p class="MsoBodyText4"><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:10.5pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US; mso-ligatures:none">Continue back into Rockville.<o:p></o:p></span></p> <p>-END-</p>
<p><strong>Driving the Blue Route - 36 miles<br /> </strong></p> <p class="MsoBodyText4"><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US; mso-ligatures:none">Leave the north side of the Depot parking lot, turn left on US 36 </span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;font-style:italic;language:en-US; mso-ansi-language:en-US;mso-ligatures:none">(Ohio Street)</span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US; mso-ligatures:none">. Go one block and turn right on Erie Street. Follow blue arrow signs to stop sign at Erie and Stark Street. Turn right on Stark Street, then left onto Marshall Road.<o:p></o:p></span></p> <p class="MsoBodyText4"><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US; mso-ligatures:none">Proceed on Marshall Road </span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;font-style:italic;language:en-US; mso-ansi-language:en-US;mso-ligatures:none">(Marshall Road becomes Main Street in Marshall)</span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US; mso-ligatures:none">. At stop sign of Main Street and State Road 236, go straight ahead under the Marshall Arch, staying on Main Street. Main Street will become Marshall Road again.<o:p></o:p></span></p> <p class="MsoBodyText4"><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US; mso-ligatures:none">At stop sign of Marshall Road and State Road 47, go across onto Narrows Road. Follow blue signs to&nbsp;</span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;font-weight:bold;language:en-US; mso-ansi-language:en-US;mso-ligatures:none">#37 Narrows Bridge</span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US; mso-ligatures:none">. Turn around at Henley Road and return to stop sign at Narrows Road and State Road 47. Turn right onto State Road 47.<o:p></o:p></span></p> <p class="MsoBodyText4"><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US; mso-ligatures:none">Turn right at Cox Ford Road. This will become a gravel road. Proceed to </span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;font-weight:bold;language:en-US; mso-ansi-language:en-US;mso-ligatures:none">#36 Cox Ford Bridge</span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US; mso-ligatures:none">. Cross bridge, still on Cox Ford Road. Stay on Cox Ford Road to </span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;font-weight:bold;language:en-US; mso-ansi-language:en-US;mso-ligatures:none">#35 Wilkins Mill Bridge</span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US; mso-ligatures:none">. Cross bridge. At stop sign at US 41, turn right and proceed to County Road 1050N, turn left.<o:p></o:p></span></p> <p class="MsoBodyText4"><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US; mso-ligatures:none">Stay on 1050N. At second cross roads, 1050N and B&rsquo;dale Road turn left. At this point you will see both blue and yellow route signs. B&rsquo;dale Road will show two options. Turn left, staying on blacktop on B&rsquo;dale Road. Stop sign at B&rsquo;dale Road and 250W, turn right on B&rsquo;dale Road. Proceed to </span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;font-weight:bold;language:en-US; mso-ansi-language:en-US;mso-ligatures:none">#28 Jackson Bridge</span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US; mso-ligatures:none">.<o:p></o:p></span></p> <p class="MsoBodyText4"><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US; mso-ligatures:none">Stay on B&rsquo;dale Road into Bloomingdale. B&rsquo;dale Road will become Main Street in town. At the &ldquo;T&rdquo; go left then right on Broadway. At 4-way stop turn left on Hilltop Road. At stop sign at Hilltop Road and US 41, turn right onto US 41. Proceed south on US 41. You will see&nbsp;&nbsp; </span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;font-weight:bold;language:en-US; mso-ansi-language:en-US;mso-ligatures:none">#13 Catlin Bridge</span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US; mso-ligatures:none"> on the right at the Parke County Golf Course. Proceed into Rockville to end your tour.<o:p></o:p></span></p> <p>-END-</p>
Parke County Fairgrounds. Drive your antique tractor. Registration fee for one or two days. Travel rural Parke County and see covered bridges and communities.No adm charge. 765-569-1619 for more information
<p><strong>Driving the Red Route - 34 miles<br /> </strong></p> <p class="MsoBodyText4"><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:10.5pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US; mso-ligatures:none">Leave south side of Depot parking lot, turn right onto High Street. At the stop sign, turn left on Bridgeton Road.&nbsp;Continue south on Bridgeton Road. <o:p></o:p></span></p> <p class="MsoBodyText4"><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:10.5pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US; mso-ligatures:none">OPTION : If you would like to view </span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:10.5pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;font-weight:bold;language:en-US; mso-ansi-language:en-US;mso-ligatures:none">#12 Crooks Covered Bridge</span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:10.5pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US; mso-ligatures:none">, turn left onto Wimmer Road </span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:10.5pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;font-style:italic;language:en-US; mso-ansi-language:en-US;mso-ligatures:none">(Gravel)</span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:10.5pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US; mso-ligatures:none">. Turn around at the Covered Bridge and return to Bridgeton Road.<o:p></o:p></span></p> <p class="MsoBodyText4"><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:10.5pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US; mso-ligatures:none">Proceed south on Bridgeton Road. As you are traveling on Bridgeton Road, you will see </span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:10.5pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;font-weight:bold;language:en-US; mso-ansi-language:en-US;mso-ligatures:none">#11 McAllister Bridge </span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:10.5pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US; mso-ligatures:none">on your left on County Road 400S </span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:10.5pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;font-style:italic;language:en-US; mso-ansi-language:en-US;mso-ligatures:none">(Gravel)</span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:10.5pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US; mso-ligatures:none">. </span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:10.5pt; font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; font-style:italic;language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US;mso-ligatures:none">The route does not turn here, however you can visit the bridge and return to Bridgeton Road, turn to Bridgeton Road, turn left stop sign and continue to the Black Route. <o:p></o:p></span></p> <p class="MsoBodyText4"><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:10.5pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US; mso-ligatures:none">Next you will see </span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size: 10.5pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;font-weight:bold;language:en-US; mso-ansi-language:en-US;mso-ligatures:none">#10 Neet Bridge </span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:10.5pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US; mso-ligatures:none">on the left. Stay on Bridgeton Road and you will come into Bridgeton and see </span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:10.5pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;font-weight:bold;language:en-US; mso-ansi-language:en-US;mso-ligatures:none">#8 Bridgeton Bridge</span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:10.5pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US; mso-ligatures:none">. The Bridgeton Bridge was burned by arson in 2005, and the bridge that you see now was built in 2006.<o:p></o:p></span></p> <p class="MsoBodyText4"><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:10.5pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US; mso-ligatures:none">Continue the Red Route through Bridgeton. Turn right on High Banks Road. Turn right on Rosedale Road. As you are coming into Rosedale, you will see </span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:10.5pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;font-weight:bold;language:en-US; mso-ansi-language:en-US;mso-ligatures:none">#16 Thorpe Ford Bridge</span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:10.5pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US; mso-ligatures:none">. This bridge is not on the marked route, but you can find it by turning onto Cemetery Street in Rosedale. Staying on Cemetery Street, it becomes Catlin Road.&nbsp; Proceed to the bridge, turn around and return on&nbsp;Cemetery Street to the stop sign. Turn right to continue the route.<o:p></o:p></span></p> <p class="MsoBodyText4"><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:10.5pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US; mso-ligatures:none">Continue through Rosedale following the red arrow signs. You will see </span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:10.5pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;font-weight:bold;language:en-US; mso-ansi-language:en-US;mso-ligatures:none">#18 Roseville Bridge </span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:10.5pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US; mso-ligatures:none">on the right. The route does not turn here, but you can turn right and drive through the Roseville Bridge </span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:10.5pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;font-style:italic;language:en-US; mso-ansi-language:en-US;mso-ligatures:none">(Gravel) </span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:10.5pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US; mso-ligatures:none">and </span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:10.5pt; font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; font-weight:bold;language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US;mso-ligatures:none">#19 Harry&nbsp;Evans Bridge</span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:10.5pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US; mso-ligatures:none"> is just around the curve to the left on&nbsp; County Road 325W. Turn around there and return through the Roseville Bridge to the stop sign at Coxville Road, turn right to continue the Red Route.<o:p></o:p></span></p> <p class="MsoBodyText4"><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:10.5pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US; mso-ligatures:none">Following the red arrow signs, you will continue on&nbsp;Coxville Road, cross US 41, and continue to </span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:10.5pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;font-weight:bold;language:en-US; mso-ansi-language:en-US;mso-ligatures:none">#21 Mecca Bridge</span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:10.5pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US; mso-ligatures:none">. This is the last bridge on the route and the&nbsp;remaining signs will bring you to US 41. Turn left and&nbsp;continue back to Rockville.<o:p></o:p></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span lang="en-US">&nbsp;</span>-END-</p>
Tri Kappa's Gamma Sigma chapter invites you the Art Affair on the Square on the historic Courthouse Square in Rockville. Features will included the finest in Juried Art by Midwest Fine Artists and Skilled Craft Artists. Categories will include pottery, enamel, glass, metal, wood, mixed media, oil, watercolor, photography, print making, sculpture, textiles, fiber, jewelry, skilled crafts and etc. Also a creative arts and crafts area for children and perennials, annuals and unusual herbs. This day will be a shopper's delight with live music throughout the day. Food available. For more information or to enter please call 765-366-1487.
<p><strong>Driving the Brown Route - 24 miles<br /> </strong></p> <p class="MsoBodyText4"><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US; mso-ligatures:none">Leave the north side of the Depot parking lot, turn left on US 36 </span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;font-style:italic;language:en-US; mso-ansi-language:en-US;mso-ligatures:none">(Ohio Street)</span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US; mso-ligatures:none">. At the second stop light by the courthouse turn right on Market Street. Curving to the left, Market Street becomes Howard Avenue. At the stop light, drive across US 41.<o:p></o:p></span></p> <p class="MsoBodyText4"><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US; mso-ligatures:none">Howard Avenue becomes Strawberry Road. Following brown arrow signs, stay on Strawberry Road, you will come to </span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;font-weight:bold;language:en-US; mso-ansi-language:en-US;mso-ligatures:none">#24 Melcher Bridge</span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US; mso-ligatures:none">. Continue no Strawberry Road to stop sign. Turn left on 600W. At stop sign, turn right on US 36 and go into Montezuma.</span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;font-style:italic;language:en-US; mso-ansi-language:en-US;mso-ligatures:none"><o:p></o:p></span></p> <p class="MsoBodyText4"><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US; mso-ligatures:none">Turn on 40N. Continue to stop sign at </span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;font-weight:bold;language:en-US; mso-ansi-language:en-US;mso-ligatures:none">#23 Sim Smith Bridge</span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US; mso-ligatures:none">. Turn right and drive through Sim Smith Bridge </span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;font-style:italic;language:en-US; mso-ansi-language:en-US;mso-ligatures:none">(use caution, this is a blind turn and there may be approaching traffic on bridge)</span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US; mso-ligatures:none">.<o:p></o:p></span></p> <p class="MsoBodyText4"><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US; mso-ligatures:none">Continue on 40N, turn right on Arabia Road to&nbsp;</span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;font-weight:bold;language:en-US; mso-ansi-language:en-US;mso-ligatures:none">#22 Phillips Bridge</span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US; mso-ligatures:none">. Continue through bridge on Arabia Road to stop sign. Turn right on 100S - McAdams Road. Stay on McAdams. As you approach Mecca, McAdams Road becomes Apple Road. At the stop sign, continue straight ahead on Wabash Street to </span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;font-weight:bold;language:en-US; mso-ansi-language:en-US;mso-ligatures:none">#21 Mecca Bridge</span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US; mso-ligatures:none">. Turn around here and return to the corner of Apple Road and Wabash Street, turning right on Wabash Street </span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;font-style:italic;language:en-US; mso-ansi-language:en-US;mso-ligatures:none">(becomes Mecca Road)</span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US; mso-ligatures:none">. At this point you will see brown and red arrow signs. Proceed to the stop sign at US 41. Turn left and return to Rockville.<o:p></o:p></span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span lang="en-US">&nbsp;</span>-END-</p>
<p><strong>Driving the Yellow Route - 34 miles<br /> </strong></p> <p class="MsoBodyText4"><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US; mso-ligatures:none">Leave the north side of the Depot parking lot, turn left on US 36 </span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;font-style:italic;language:en-US; mso-ansi-language:en-US;mso-ligatures:none">(Ohio Street)</span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US; mso-ligatures:none">. At the second stop light by the courthouse turn right on Market Street. Curving to the left, Market Street becomes Howard Avenue. At the stop light, drive across US 41.<o:p></o:p></span></p> <p class="MsoBodyText4"><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US; mso-ligatures:none">Howard Avenue becomes Strawberry Road. Following yellow arrow signs, turn right on 10 O&rsquo;clock Road. At&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 4-way stop sign, go straight ahead on 10 O&rsquo;clock Road. At stop sign turn right on Tow Path Road to </span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;font-weight:bold;language:en-US; mso-ansi-language:en-US;mso-ligatures:none">#26 West Union Bridge</span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US; mso-ligatures:none">. Proceed on Tow Path Road then curve right on 525W.<o:p></o:p></span></p> <p class="MsoBodyText4"><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US; mso-ligatures:none">Turn right on 790N </span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;font-style:italic;language:en-US; mso-ansi-language:en-US;mso-ligatures:none">(beginning of gravel road area)&nbsp;&nbsp; </span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US; mso-ligatures:none">then left at 450W, then right on 800N then turn left on English Road. At stop sign, turn left on 900N to </span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;font-weight:bold;language:en-US; mso-ansi-language:en-US;mso-ligatures:none">#30 Rush Creek Bridge</span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US; mso-ligatures:none">. Proceed to stop sign </span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;font-style:italic;language:en-US; mso-ansi-language:en-US;mso-ligatures:none">(end of&nbsp; gravel road area)</span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US; mso-ligatures:none">. Turn right on 425W. At next stop sign turn right on 1050N.<o:p></o:p></span></p> <p class="MsoBodyText4"><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US; mso-ligatures:none">Stay on 1050N, then turn right on B&rsquo;dale Road. At this point you will see both yellow arrow signs and blue&nbsp; arrow signs. B&rsquo;dale Road will have two options at the &ldquo;T&rdquo;. Turn left on B&rsquo;dale Road. Stop sign at B&rsquo;dale Road and 250W, turn right on B&rsquo;dale Road to </span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;font-weight:bold;language:en-US; mso-ansi-language:en-US;mso-ligatures:none">#28 Jackson Bridge</span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US; mso-ligatures:none">.<o:p></o:p></span></p> <p class="MsoBodyText4"><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US; mso-ligatures:none">Stay on B&rsquo;dale Road into Bloomingdale. B&rsquo;dale Road becomes Main Street in town. At the &ldquo;T&rdquo; go left then right on Broadway. At the 4-way stop sign turn left onto Hilltop Road. At the stop sign at Hilltop Road and US 41, turn right onto US 41. Proceed south on US 41.&nbsp; You can see </span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;font-weight:bold;language:en-US; mso-ansi-language:en-US;mso-ligatures:none">#13 Catlin Bridge </span><span lang="en-US" style="font-size:11.0pt;font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-default-font-family: &quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-ascii-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-latin-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-greek-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;mso-cyrillic-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;; mso-latinext-font-family:&quot;Arial Narrow&quot;;language:en-US;mso-ansi-language:en-US; mso-ligatures:none">on the right at the Parke County Golf Course. Proceed into Rockville to end your tour.<o:p></o:p></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span lang="en-US">&nbsp;</span>-END-</p>
Bridgeton Grist Mill 1878 Grounds Live demonstrations at the mill. Grinding flour and cornmeal on a 200 year old French buhr stones. Pioneer craft demonstrations, fiber arts. No admission. For more information call 765-548-2136 or visit www.bridgetonindiana.com
<p>The ideal group escape destination with reservation required.&nbsp; Located at the Covered Bridge State Forest.&nbsp; Campgrounds, Equestrian Facilites and Main Lodge.</p> <p>For general information <a href="http://www.coveredbridgeretreat.dnr.In.gov">www.coveredbridgeretreat.dnr.In.gov</a></p> <p>For Rates &amp; Availablity see our Covered Bridge Retreat posting at <a href="http://www.Camp.IN.Gov">www.Camp.IN.Gov</a>&nbsp;amd enter Covered Bridge Retreat or call 866-622-6746</p> <p><br /> &nbsp;</p>
<p>Various house rentals located around and near Raccoon Lake State Recreation Area.&nbsp; Weekly rentals only.&nbsp; Great for families or large groups.&nbsp; Contact Laura</p>
Current list of available lodging i the Parke County Covered Bridge Festival
Holiday Tour of Homes is sponsored by the Art Association on the first Saturday of December and showcases five homes in the county. These homes are decorated for the Christmas Holiday by the owners and county merchants and are sure to inspire your decorating whims! Tickets will be on sale at the Art Gallery up to a week in advance. For more information visit: www.coveredbridgeartgallery.org or call: 765-569-9422
<p>The Bridgeton Mill was established in 1823. Family owned and operated for over 180 years (not the same family). Stone ground products, Amish products, snacks, souvenirs and ice cream. Food available Friday - Sunday. Open April - November, Thursday - Monday 10:00 till tired. New this year - Sweet Potato Pie Ice Cream.</p> <p>Contact: Mike Roe <!--EndFragment--> <o:p></o:p> <!--EndFragment--></p>
<p>The 9-hole &quot;Parke County&quot; course at the Parke County Golf Course facility in Rockville, Indiana features 3,073 yards of golf from the longest tees for a par of 35 . The course rating is 69.5 and it has a slope rating of 111.&nbsp; Designed by William H. Diddel, ASGCA, the Parke County golf course opened in 1961.</p>
<p>Come paddle through Turkey Run and Shades State Parks and under 4 historic covered bridges. Stop along the many sandbars and hunt for rocks, fossils, crinoids and Indian Beads.</p> <p>Paddle down the stream the Piankeshaw Indians called &quot;Pun-go-se-co-ne&quot; or &quot;Water of Many Sugar Trees&quot;.</p> <p>Our trips range from one-hour floats to overnight adventures. So, pack your picnic lunch and come float down beautiful Sugar Creek!</p> <p>The beauty and history of Sugar Creek can best be experienced by drifting through its valleys in one of our quality canoes or kayaks. We hope to bring this unique experience to you by providing you with quality equipment, convenient transportation to and from the stream and the best variety of trips.</p> <p>QUALITY EQUIPMENT: No aluminum canoes here!! Discover the difference of our canoes. No clanging like aluminum. No Hot seats. Slips thru rocky shallows.</p> <p>CONVENIENT LOCATION NEAR TURKEY RUN: We are located on State Road 47 across from Turkey Run Campground. We are one mile from the Jct. of US 41 and SR 47.</p>
Turkey Run State Park Turkey Run State Park has miles of bridle trails, so you can enjoy guided horseback rides. Inquire at the saddle barn. (Sorry, you can't bring your own horse.) While you're at the saddle barn, also ask about hayrides. The saddle barn is open from April through October 9am - 5pm (weather permitting). The saddle barn is closed in the winter. For more info call the Saddle Barn at (765) 597-2280.
61st Parke County Bridge Festival. The festival always starts on the 2nd Friday of October.
We are a small, but unique, motel located in the heart of Parke County in Rockville Indiana, The Covered Bridge Capital of the World, 8 miles from Turkey Run State Park in Marshall, In., within walking distance of antiques, crafts.....9 miles from Mansfield, Indiana.  Two blocks from historic downtown Rockville. Parke County-themed rooms offer the guest a unique lodging experience.   Rooms offer microwave, refridgerator and coffee for your use.  An honor-system snack room is also available. Large wrap-around front porch on Victorian house for your use and enjoyment. Marked paved parking. There are ten ground floor units and two upstairs suites. Triple AAA 4Diamond rated for cleanliness. Amenities: Free hi-speed internet, local and long distance phone calls, ice, coffee, tea. Continental Breakfast is served from Memorial Day until the Covered Bridge Festival.  
<p><strong>Built:</strong> 1867<br /> <strong>
Builder:</strong> Joseph J. Daniels <br /> <strong>Creek:</strong> Big Raccoon<br /> <strong>Location:</strong> Located in Mansfield near Mansfield Mill and mill dam. <br /> <strong>Reference Code:</strong> #5 14-61-20, 12-61-21, gb, Jackson 8-14N&mdash;6W <br /> <strong>Size: </strong>247 ft long +16&rsquo;+16&rsquo;, 16 ft wide, 14 ft clearance <br /> <strong>Truss:</strong> Double Burr Arch 2 Span <br /> <strong>Foundation: </strong>Hewn limestone block
 <br /> <strong>Original Cost:</strong> $12,200</p> <p><strong>Repair/Restoration History: </strong>
Closed for repairs in 1980. Abutments, roof and deck repaired. Roof and deck replaced October, 1990 by County Highway Department.</p> <p><strong>Bridge History:</strong> 
James Kelsey and wife came to the Mansfield area from Ireland in 1819. Later, he and Francis Dicksen erected a mill in about 1820. Others who assisted included William Bullington, Thomas Wolverton, Bliss Kelley Nelson, Hubbard, Kelsey, and Dicksen. The village was on the Indian trail from Orchard Town (in Terre Haute) to Cornstalk, an Indian village in Sugar Creek Township. The mill was about 30 feet square and the foundation of the mill and dam was an unbroken floor of red sandstone.</p> <p>The village was called New Dublin, named after the Irish city.</p> <p>A sawmill was attached to the north side of the mill in 1830. It used a sash saw. This was used to saw timbers for the next mill. The first mill had grown to 48 feet by 56 feet and three stories high but was not suited to new machinery.</p> <p>Jacob Rohm built a new mill in 1880. He bought the mill in 1874 after a freshet destroyed the dam with ice. The new dam was seven feet tall. (A former owner had built up the dam to 9 feet and the water had destroyed a nearby field. A court ordered it reduced to seven feet and it had been extended to protect the field.) The new mill was 26 by 34 feet, 3 1/2 stories high. In about 1892, the Fort Wayne, Terre Haute, and southwestern Railroad built a spur to the red sandstone quarry near Mansfield.</p> <p>The tracks passed a few feet from the front entrance. The railroad bought the mill to settle the access dispute. After the quarry and railroad failed, the mill was returned to the Rohm Brothers.</p> <p>In 1913, the old wooden dam was replaced by a concrete one 180 feet long by 7 feet high, reinforced with iron stays and buttresses. One buttress was made into a fish ladder about 40 feet long and 6 feet wide. Colonel Johnston was elected county commissioner in 1866. As some of his opponents predicted, he built a covered bridge in 1867. The ethical questions arose because he owned the land on both sides of the bridge and a new access road had to be built on the east side.</p> <p>One month after the completion of the Roseville Bridge, J.J. Daniels was appointed to draw up plans and specifications for the Mansfield Bridge. He was awarded the contract on December 7, 1866, and the bridge was completed and inspected September 4, 1867.</p> <p>Although built in 1867 for wagons, the Mansfield Bridge still has a 10 ton load limit. In one story, while the bridge was still used for state route 59, three loaded oil trucks approached the bridge. The first truck stalled out just before leaving the bridge, and all three trucks came to a stop on the two spans. There was no apparent damage to the strong structure.</p> <p>The small structure southwest of the bridge is a gauging station. It is used to remotely report the water level and to calculate the rate of water release from Mansfield Reservoir.</p>
Running thru two of Parke County's Covered Bridges--Sim Smith and Phillips Registration 7:00 am--Kids Run/Walk 7:45 am--Adult Run/Walk Race Time 8:00 am Location 4338 W 40 N and US Hwy 36 Rockville, In 47872 (4 miles east of Montezuma or 5 miles west of Rockville AWARDS Plaques for overall male in the run and overall female in the run, overall male in the walk & overall female in the walk. Medals for top 3 in each age group in the run and Medals for top 2 in each age group in the walk. Participation ribbons for Fun-Run/Walk T-Shirt guaranteed to Pre-Registered Racer--late registration T-Shirts will be on a first come first serve basis 5K run/walk $20.00 advance-$22.00 after 4/30/12 Fun-Run--children 10 & under $10.00 advance-$12.00 For more information call 765-592-0821
<p><strong>Built: </strong>1900<br /> <strong>Builder:</strong> Joseph J. Daniels <br /> <strong>Creek:</strong> Big Rocky Fork (was Rocky Fork) <br /> <strong>Location: </strong>Located 1 mile southeast of Mansfield on Greencastle Road, near Fallen Rock Park.<br /> <strong>Reference Code: </strong>#6, 14-61-01, 12-61-01, ah, Jackson 16-14N&mdash;6W <br /> <strong>Size: </strong>72 ft long +8&rsquo; +8&rsquo;, 16 ft wide, 13&rsquo; clearance
 <br /> <strong>Truss: </strong>Burr Arch 1 span
 <br /> <strong>Foundation: </strong>Hewn limestone block
<br /> <strong>Original Cost: </strong>$1,475.50</p> <p><strong>Repair/Restoration History: </strong>
Bypassed in 1987.</p> <p><strong>Bridge History: 
</strong>Also known as &quot;Murphy Bridge&quot;</p> <p>The bridge was named after the creek.</p> <p>Joseph J. Daniels completed the bridge, September 7, 1900.</p> <p>Fallen Rock Park was named for a smokehouse size sandstone rock that fell into the creek.</p> <p>In the vicinity of Big Rocky Fork Bridge and Fallen Rock Park is one of Parke County&rsquo;s mysterious rock graves. Hidden on the side of a 100 foot high cliff, it is not visible from below or above. A streamlet is also a poorly defined trail up the cliff.</p> <p>The grave is 9 feet long by 30 inches deep and 20 inches wide. The path seems to step directly into the foot of the grave. A stone pillow is cut into the head end. There are three divergent stories to explain its origin: The first story attributes the grave to the Indians prior to the 1820&rsquo;s settlement of the area. A second story attributes the excavation to a group of campers from near Fallen Rock in the late 1800&rsquo;s. The third story attributes the grave to a local farmer, a Mr. Israel Asbury. This story said that he dug it so that his family could bring him here. Or, they wondered if he intended to come here to die. Instead, he was killed while setting on a railroad tie oblivious to the oncoming train whistle. He was buried in an ordinary cemetery, and the grave was never finished or occupied.</p> <p>Since the bridge was bypassed, maintenance responsibility has passed from the Parke County Highway Department to the Parke County Park Department. Due to very limited funds, very little maintenance has been performed. On July 13,1991 a local group began to clean up the bridge site in response to the Adopt-A-Bridge program.</p>
Weekend of fun viewing and learning about bald eagles in the area. For complete details contact the Turkey Run State Park Office at 765-597-2654 or visit www.in.gov/dnr/parklake/2964.htm
<p><strong>Built: </strong>1906-7<br /> <strong>Builder:</strong> J. Lawrence Van Fossen <br /> <strong>Creek: </strong>Big Raccoon Creek <br /> <strong>Location:</strong> Located between Mansfield and Bridgeton, 2 miles southwest of Mansfield. <br /> <strong>Reference Code:</strong> #7, 14-61-02, 12-61-02, ba, Raccoon 13-14N&mdash;7W <br /> <strong>Size: </strong>192 ft long, +10&rsquo; +10&rsquo;, 16 ft wide, 13&rsquo; clearance
 <br /> <strong>Truss: </strong>Double Burr Arch 1 Span
 <br /> <strong>Foundation:</strong> Concrete</p> <p><strong>Repair/Restoration History:</strong> 
Resided and reroofed in 1991.</p> <p><strong>Bridge History: 
</strong>This bridge was built of white pine. Most Parke County bridges were predominantly built of poplar. It has been claimed as the fourth longest single span covered bridge in the world.</p> <p>J. Lawrence Van Fossen built the Conley&rsquo;s Ford Bridge the same year that his brother, Jefferson P. Van Fossen, built the Adam&rsquo;s Bridge. Jefferson P. Van Fossen later built the Jessup Bridge, in 1910 and was the contractor for the second Roseville Bridge, that same year.</p> <p>J. Lawrence Van Fossen constructed the abutments for the Billie Creek Bridge, in 1895. He transported the stone from the nearby quarry.</p> <p>The Van Fossens worked for the Parke County Road Department. The Van Fossens worked closely with Joseph J. Daniels who built the Roseville, and Billie Creek bridges.</p> <p>All of their bridges have the &quot;Daniel&rsquo;s Arch&quot; and the Daniel&rsquo;s construction style.</p> <p>In 1991, the &quot;Daniels Portals&quot; have been changed to &quot;Britton Portals,&quot; and the 1906-07 date reduced to 1907. It has a corrugated galvanized steel roof and has been completely resided and painted.</p> <p>Earlier portal lettering included commissioners, auditors, treasurer, and builder. Legible portions of old photographs include Bradfield, Grubb and Baxted(?), Commissioners, A. Pickett, Engineer.</p> <p>The phrase &quot;Cross This Bridge At A Walk&quot; refers to the speed and gait of a horse. The rhythmic running of a horse can set up destructive vibrations in a bridge. The sign does not require the automobile, wagon, or bicycle rider to dismount and walk across the bridge.</p>
Built: 2006¨ Builder: Dan Collom & local community Creek: Big Raccoon Creek Location: Bridgeton Indiana Reference Code: #8, 14-61-04, 12-61-04, bt Raccoon 15/22-14N-7W Size: 245 feet long, +11’+11’, 13’ ft wide, 12’ clearance¨ Truss: Burr Arch 2 Span¨ Foundation: Sandstone Block
For complete details contact 765-548-2136 or visit bridgetonindiana.com
Festivities around the county to welcome the holiday season. Rockville, Bridgeton, Mansfield, Montezuma and other communities host activities to make the season right.
Turkey Run State Park has miles of bridle trails, so you can enjoy guided horseback rides. Inquire at the saddle barn. (Sorry, you can't bring your own horse.) While you're at the saddle barn, also ask about hayrides. The saddle barn is open from April through October 9am - 5pm (weather permitting). The saddle barn is closed in the winter. For more info call the Saddle Barn at 765-597-2280.
Lots of shopping for the holidays at the Rosedale Elementary School. Contact the school for more inforamtion 765-548-2454.
<p>Turkey Run Golf Club is an exciting 18 hole championship golf course located 6 miles east of Turkey Run State Park on State Road 47 in scenic Parke County Indiana.
</p> <p>You'll never get bored with the challenging course layout which includes rolling terrain, mature trees and 3 ponds. The well manicured, undulating greens are a pleasure to play. Our reasonable rates and many weekly specials make this one of the states best kept secrets.
</p> <p>There are four sets of tees to choose (including senior tees) from with the Championship tees measuring 6523 yards. The slope is 124 and the rating is 70.5.</p>
Women Wellness Weekend at Turkey Run! This is a fantastic weekend for women aged 18 and up, filled with fun, fellowship, learning and wellness. Women's wellness retreat includes classes ranging from wood carving, candle making, wine tasting and lots more with or without INN room nights. Adm. Chg. Contact Kristina at 877-500-6151 Ext 193 or khale@dnr.in.gov
Turkey Run Inn provides the comfort of a modern facility with the ambiance of rustic country inn. Turkey Run Inn combines great food, comfortable lodging & gracious hospitality to create a relaxing environment. While visiting Turkey Run Inn, enjoy many activities in or around Turkey Run State Park such as horseback riding, canoeing, kayaking, mini-golf, go-karts, interpretive Nature Center & 14 miles of hiking trails. Amenities: Turkey Run Inn offers an indoor heated pool, complimentary high-speed wireless internet, arcade, spacious lobby & full-service restaurant, Narrows Restaurant.
Halloween fun held at Reeder Park in Montezuma
<p>A stay at the Econolodge will provide a nostalgic experience that will help recall memories of youthful days in the country. Our 30 room inn offers modern conveniences for your stay while being surrounded by the rural culture of food, covered bridges, wagon rides, a turn of the century village and a farmstead with farm animals.</p> <p>Amenities: Outdoor swimming pool, whirlpool rooms, pet friendly & continental breakfast.</p>
<p>Amenities: Knotty pine walls &amp; ceilings. Cable TV (HBO/Cinemax). Phones with individual extensions. Wireless internet. Rooms with kitchens, but cooking and eating utensils are not supplied. No pets. Two blocks south of the intersection of US 36 and US 41 on US 41.</p>
Nature Center at Turkey Run State Park. Come celebrate Earth Day and learn how to live green and how to up-cycle old itme.s Make fun crafts and much more. Adm. Chg. Call 765-597-2654 for complete details.
<p>Family owned 17 room motel in the heart of the Covered Bridge Capital. We offer down home country hospitality with special attention to your needs.</p> <p>Amenities: Non-smoking rooms, large parking lot for boats, trucks, and buses, cable TV and free local calls available. Located near fishing lakes, golf courses, canoeing, and 3 state parks.</p>
<p><strong>Built:</strong> 1904<br /> <strong>Builder: </strong>Joseph J. Daniels <br /> <strong>Creek:</strong> Little Raccoon Creek <br /> <strong>Location:</strong> Located 6 miles southeast of Rockville on Bridgeton Road. Also on &quot;Red Route&quot; <br /> <strong>Reference Code:</strong> #10, 14-61 -18, 12-61 -19, be, Adams 33-15N&mdash;7W <br /> <strong>Size: </strong>126&rsquo; long +9&rsquo; +9&rsquo;, 16&rsquo; wide, 14&rsquo; clearance<br /> <strong>Truss:</strong> Burr Arch 1 span<br /> <strong>Foundation:</strong> Concrete reinforced with wood pilings</p> <p><strong>Repair/Restoration History:</strong> Repainted 1989 by Rockville Boy Scout Troop 469</p> <p><strong>Bridge History:</strong> Also known as &quot;Dietrich Bridge&quot;</p> <p>The Neet Bridge was the last covered bridge contracted by J.J.Daniels. He was 78. (He may have been the builder of the Roseville Bridge in 1910, contracted by J.P. Van Fossen.</p> <p>The bridge was named, for nearby landowners. Enoch Shrigley referred to it as the Joe Neet Bridge. Joseph W. Neet, born in 1862, owned the 176 acres of section 33 in Adams Township. His son was Parke Neet. George M. Neet, born in 1869, rented 20 acres north of the Bridge.</p> <p>Later, Robert E. Detrich owned part of the section at the bridge through 1959. By 1990 he owned 40 acres a little further from the bridge, although the property is marked as Detrich Tree Farm.</p> <p>The Central Indiana Railroad route through Bridgeton to a junction east of Rockville passed the Neet Bridge. The elevated railroad bed crossed the Bridgeton Road just north of the bridge. The railroad bridge across Little Raccoon Creek was just upstream from the Neet Bridge and was visible from it in Fall and Winter. Stencils and a note card in the bridge state that the bridge was repainted March 25,1989, by Rockville Boy Scout Troop 469. The note says four gallons of paint was required and the painters included Ted Gahimer, Bruce Girdler, Matt Garrett, and Shawn Taylor.</p> <p>The portal credits include H. Grode, Engineer, A. Pickett, J.J Daniels Builder, 1904, load limit 8 tons.</p>
<p><strong>Built: </strong>1907, moved 1961<br /> <strong>Builder: </strong>Clark McDaniel, moved by Garrard Brothers Trucking <br /> <strong>Creek:</strong> Sunderland Creek, moved to Bill Diddle <br /> <strong>Location: </strong>Located on north side of Catlin on Rockville Rosedale Road. Moved to Rockville Golf Course, 2 miles north of Rockville, near US Highway 41 and County Fairgrounds. Also on &quot;Blue Route&quot; <br /> <strong>Reference Code: </strong>#13,14-61-15,12-61-16, er, Florida/Adams 36/31-15N&mdash;7/8W. Moved to Penn 36-16N&mdash;8W <br /> <strong>Size: </strong>54 ft long +9&rsquo; +9&rsquo;, 16 ft wide, 13&rsquo; clearance<br /> <strong>Truss:</strong> Burr Arch 1 span<br /> <strong>Foundation:</strong> Poured concrete (both)</p> <p><strong>Bridge History: </strong>William Rea was the first settler near Catlin in 1820. The town was named Catlin Station on the Vandalia Railroad from a resident, Hiram Catlin. Along with a Mr. Montgomery and Henry Miller, they decided to establish a shipping point in the early years of the Civil War. (These names have also been reported as Thomas Catlin, Samuel Catlin, and Thomas Harshman.)</p> <p>James Ray built a steam powered flour mill on the south side of town in about 1865. It was operated by McCullough and Chambers and later by Charles Rapp and Hiram Brown. After the business failed, the building was converted into a hotel called the Perrin Hotel. The hotel and several other businesses burned in August, 1902. The fire started from hot coals expelled by a train which ignited dry grass.</p> <p>W.R.Pence and L.O.Gray started a poultry business in 1892. In 1917, the business was expanded, cold storage added, and an ice house built. The building has since housed a grocery store, Post Office, drug store, Masonic lodge hall, and remains today as a private welding shop.</p> <p>Coal mines were located east of town. They closed suddenly in 1919 when flooded with quicksand. Some of the miners lost their tools in the flood of sand.</p> <p>Stockyards were located southwest of town. Cattle were driven there for rail loading. The rail depot remains, windows covered with plastic, across the road from the abandoned railbed.</p> <p>The Rockville Rosedale Road, once called the Ben Hur Highway, was a major route to Crawfordsville. Even after construction of US Highway 41, it continued to carry heavy agricultural truck traffic. The Catlin Bridge was condemned and closed soon after the Covered Bridge Festivals began. Federal funds were made available to upgrade roads.</p> <p>Before replacement, the bridge was allowed to fall into a severe state of disrepair. In order to prevent the outright destruction of this valuable covered bridge, funding was raised to move it to the Rockville Golf Course.</p> <p>Although sufficient funds were raised to move the bridge, several years passed before a foundation was constructed, the siding, roof, and deck were repaired, and the bridge was properly repainted. Some golfers even lobbied for the demolition and removal of it as an obstacle and eyesore.</p> <p>The Catlin Bridge is now on public display, spanning a stream named for the golf course designer.</p>
<p><strong>Built:</strong> 1914<br /> <strong>Builder:</strong> Joseph A. Britton <br /> <strong>Creek:</strong> Little Raccoon Creek <br /> <strong>Location:</strong> Located 5 1/2 miles southeast of Rockville, 2 1/2 miles northeast of Catlin. Also on &quot;Red Route&quot; <strong><br /> Reference Code:</strong> #11,14-61 -16, 12-61-17, eu, Adams 28/33-15N&mdash;7W <br /> <strong>Size: </strong>126 ft long +9&rsquo; +9&rsquo;, 16 ft wide, 14&rsquo; clearance<br /> <strong>Truss:</strong> Burr Arch 1 span<br /> <strong>Foundation:</strong> Concrete</p> <p><strong>Bridge History: </strong>James D. McAllister, born in 1854, owned the large Fairview Hill Farm near the McAllister Bridge. It is possible to see Neet, McAllister, and Crooks covered bridges at the same time in winter. From a bird&rsquo;s eye view, Nevins could also be seen.</p> <p>This bridge was built during the height of J.A. Button&rsquo;s bridge building career. His sons were providing the bulk of the labor. He was 77 the year McAllister covered bridge was completed.</p> <p>The bridge has a galvanized steel roof. It has several noticeable repairs reinforced by steel. The abutments are wider than the ends of the bridge which are instead supported with reverse kingposts.</p> <p>The portal credits include J.M. May, J.L. Linebarger, W.M. Mottern, Commissioners, J. Elder, Auditor, J.H. Rush, Treasurer, H. L. Davies, Engineer, J.A. Britton, Builder, 1914.</p>
<p><strong>Built:</strong> 1856 or 1860 rebuilt and moved 1867 or 1872<br /> <strong>Builder: </strong>Henry Wolf rebuilt by Gen. Arthur Patterson or Joseph J. Daniels <br /> <strong>Creek: </strong>Little Raccoon (now Molasses) moved to Little Raccoon <br /> <strong>Location: </strong>Located 5 miles southeast of Rockville. Also on &quot;Red Route&quot; <br /> <strong>Reference Code: </strong>#12, 14-61-17, 12-61-18, f, Adams 21-15N&mdash;7W Size: 132 ft long +11&rsquo; +11&rsquo;, 14 ft wide, 13&rsquo; clearance<br /> <strong>Truss:</strong> Burr Arch 1 span<br /> <strong>Foundation: </strong>Hewn stone<br /> <strong>Original Cost: </strong>$1,200 or $5,900</p> <p><strong>Repair/Restoration History:</strong> The bridge was damaged in the 1875 flood and repaired.</p> <p><strong>Bridge History:</strong> Also known as &quot;Walker Adams Bridge&quot; &amp; &quot;Darroch&rsquo;s Lost Bridge&quot;</p> <p>Crooks Bridge, like many others, was originally associated with a mill. Parkers Mill was built in 1830 on a Little Raccoon ripple known as &quot;Indian Crossing&quot;. It was located about a half mile south of the Little Raccoon Bridge on the Rockville New Discovery Road. The mill account states a covered bridge was constructed just upstream from the ripple and dam.</p> <p>County Commissioners records indicate that a bridge was discussed in 1850. A bridge was ordered In December, 1855, to be located on the old Rockville Greencastle Road.</p> <p>Accounts from early pioneer times say that Sugar Creek was a vigorous river while Little Raccoon and Big Raccoon Creeks were a series of swamps, marshes, and beaver ponds spread across the valleys loosely connected by various moving stream beds.</p> <p>The bridge site channel filled in with sand and the creek &quot;moved 20 rods west&quot;. Topographic maps show an intermittent stream, now called Molasses Creek, in about the location of the old creek bed.</p> <p>There are several historical conflicts which could be resolved by a clear separation into two or three different original bridges. In any case, the name &quot;Lost Bridge&quot; is appropriate. The bridge stood, forgotten, over a dry stream bed on a road abandoned for lack of a bridge over the new creek bed. It was moved to a new location where no road yet existed.</p> <p>One account states that the bridge was rebuilt and moved to the present location in 1872 by General Arthur Patterson. A second account states that the bridge was washed to the present location in a flood. It was jacked up and abutments built beneath it. The road was moved to connect with it.</p> <p>Juliet Snowden seems to have confused this bridge with the Greencastle Road Bridge, However, in another account she wrote that the bridge was built by General Arthur Patterson in 1856. General Patterson was one of the founders of Rockville in 1824. He owned land and businesses throughout the county, and she believed this bridge opened the road to commerce between Rockville and Mansfield.</p> <p>In 1863, J.J.Daniels was contracted to dismantle the bridge on the Greencastle Road. In 1865, a viewing committee, which included J.J.Daniels, recommended the bridge be restored. Various people requested that it be relocated near their homes. In 1867, J.J.Daniels recommended that it be rebuilt at Darroch&rsquo;s site where he considered it safe from flood and there were no &quot;bayous&quot;.</p> <p>No roads were built to the bridge for several years. One story relates a wet trip by a cold I.R. Strouse, on a horse named Alice, searching for a crossing of the rain flooded Little Raccoon in 1875. He was directed through a confusing maze of connecting horse trails, finally crossing &quot;Darroch&rsquo;s Lost Bridge&quot;.</p>
<p><strong>Built: </strong>1920<br /> <strong>Builder:</strong> Joseph A. Britton &amp; Son <br /> <strong>Creek: </strong>Little Raccoon Creek <br /> <strong>Location:</strong> Located 1 mile southeast of Catlin and in Raccoon Township. <br /> <strong>Reference Code:</strong> #14, 14-61-05, 12-61-05, c, Raccoon 5-14N&mdash;7W <br /> <strong>Size: </strong>155 ft long +7&rsquo; +7&rsquo;, 16 ft wide, 13&rsquo; clearance<br /> <strong>Truss: </strong>Burr Arch 1 span<br /> <strong>Foundation: </strong>Concrete<br /> <strong>Original Cost: </strong>$11,987</p> <p><strong>Bridge History:</strong> The Nevins Bridge was built at Gilkerson&rsquo;s Ford near Gilkerson&rsquo;s Mill. Thomas Gilkerson came from Mercer County, Kentucky, in 1821. He built a mill in 1823. The Gilkerson community was nominated as the county seat in 1824 but lost out to Rockville. He worked the farm with his son, John Calvin Gilkerson, and became quite prosperous until he defaulted on a debt and lost the farm and mill in a sheriff&rsquo;s sale. Father and son worked hard to recover the property. They regained possession, and John Calvin trained a yoke of cattle to help rebuild the brush dam. They rebuilt the mill in 1837 and added a sash saw sawmill to the grist mill. The burrs required 80 days to shape for use.</p> <p>The Gilkersons worked as blacksmiths, carpenters, farmers, and millers. A small community was built around their business. From 1839 to 1846 they built several flatboats which were sent down Little Raccoon, Big Raccoon, and the Wabash during spring freshets. John C. Gilkerson was much respected, serving as Justice of the Peace for 33 years and as an elder in the Rockville Presbyterian Church.&nbsp; Thomas Levi Nevins, bom in 1869, purchased the Gilkerson property in 1897. The Nevins Bridge was named for him. He studied the mill and preserved the mill relics. In 1906 he was part owner of the Bloomingdale Mill and in 1910 he built a flour mill in Rosedale on the foundations of an older burned out mill. In 1911, after 18 months of operation, his mill burned down to the foundation. He is also remembered as a teacher at the nearby school at Minshall.</p> <p>Two builder/contractors bid on this bridge to cross Little Raccoon Creek. Joseph A. Britton and Elmer Gerard each submitted bids. Elmer Gerard won the award for the 1915 Bowsher Ford Bridge but it was built by J.A. Britton&rsquo;s son, Eugene Britton. J.A. Britton was awarded this contract, but Eugene Britton was probably a major contributor as he might have been had Elmer Gerard won the award. The building of the Nevins Covered Bridge closed an era. This bridge was the last bridge built by Joseph A. Britton. He was 83. He died at age 91. It was also the last of the historical covered bridges built in Parke County.</p> <p>This bridge has &quot;Daniels Arched Portals&quot; rather than the &quot;Britton Portals&quot; preferred by Joseph and Eugene Britton. It has a wood shingle roof. Rather than the carefully cut connecting keys of earlier bridges, the keys were square cut and reinforced by iron straps, iron rods were used to brace the sides and roof, a feature shared with the Portland Mills Bridge.</p>
Built: 1912 Builder: Joseph A. Britton Creek: Big Raccoon Creek Location: Located 1 mile northwest of Rosedale on Rosedale Rockville Road. Reference Code: #16, 14-61-07, 12-61-07, cd, Florida 23/26-14N—8W Size: 163 feet long +9’ +9’, 16 feet wide, 13’ clearance Truss: Double Burr Arch 1 Span Foundation: Concrete Repair/Restoration History: Condemned 1960. Bypassed 1961. Bridge History: The area of nearby Rosedale was first settled by John M. Doty in 1811 on an 160 acre land grant. During the War of 1812 and the Tecumseh Indian Expedition he served in Ohio, Ft.. Harrison, and Vincennes, returning in 1814. From his first two story log house he expanded his farm to 1280 acres. The town was called Dotyville until after John Doty’s death. Chauncey Rose paid for the cost of incorporation in exchange for changing the name to Rosedale. Rosedale was not thought of as a significant town until 1860 when the E&C Railroad was built. Later, coal mines opened and a second railroad was built through town. Willis Beauchamp was the first merchant. Other communities in the area included Daisyville, east of the B&O Railroad, and Blocks, a Martin Coal Company owned town, west of the Vandalia Railroad. The Thrope Ford Bridge was named for the earlier ford and the Thrope family. In 1920, Mrs. Sarah E. Thrope owned 92 acres next to the bridge. In 1948, her son Dan Thrope lived near the bridge. Early Parke County road maps show that the Thrope Ford area is a location where the Big Raccoon Creek bed is still in motion. They show two crossings, two roads, and a road intersection about where the bridge is now. The creek bed has moved as much as 1/4 mile from the west during the last 100 years. Previously, the present road continued north to connect to the Greencastle Road which also crossed Big Raccoon before continuing to Coxville. The intersecting road, now gone, continued up the steep hill as a straight line extension of the Snow Road. Thrope Ford was probably the north creek crossing rather than the south crossing now near the creek bend and intersection with the Rosedale drainage ditch. The building of the bridge is attributed to County Commissioner J.M. May. Soon after his election he attempted to travel from Rosedale to Rockville. Rather than traveling thru Coxville he obtained directions for a shorter route. After following the convoluted directions and periods of being lost, he promised a new bridge would be built. After the construction of the Thrope Ford Bridge in 1912, it was located on the major route from Terre Haute to Crawfordsville, It was called the Ben Hur highway. General Lew Wallace was a famous Crawfordsville resident and the author of the novel Ben Hur. Through the years, many have remarked on the modern day "chariot races" being conducted along this road. Many elephants and other circus animals crossed here on the way to winter camp at Peru, Indiana. Some residents remember this road as little more than a dirt path. The WPA constructed a concrete pavement in the 1930’s. Most traffic was diverted to Highway 41 after its construction in the 1920’s. Heavy agricultural traffic continued on the road. When the bridge was condemned and bypassed, it was due to the continued heavy loads using the route and the availability of federal funds to maintain roads meeting upgraded standards. 
Visit parkecountyfairgrounds.com for daily schedule of activities
<p><strong>THE 2010 FEATURED COVERED BRIDGE! <br /> Celebrating it's 100th year birthday. </strong></p> <p><strong>Built:</strong> 1910<br /> <strong>Builder: </strong>Joseph J. Daniels, or J. Brooks Jefferson P. Van Fossen contractor<br /> <strong>Creek:</strong> Big Raccoon Creek<br /> <strong>Location:</strong> Located in Roseville, north of Rosedale.<br /> <strong>Reference Code:</strong> #18, 14-61-09, 12-61-09, cw, 14-14N&mdash;8W<br /> <strong>Size:</strong> 263 ft long +9&rsquo; +9&rsquo;, 12&rsquo; 8<br /> <strong>Truss: </strong>Burr Arch 2 span<br /> <strong>Foundation:</strong> Cut sandstone<br /> <strong>Original Cost:</strong> $10,000 or $5,725 + $7.00/cubic yard of concrete</p> <p><strong>Repair/Restoration History: </strong>Third bridge at this location, second bridge destroyed by arson fire April 9, 1910.</p> <p><strong>Bridge History: </strong>After the 1865 Roseville Bridge was burned in 1910, the Parke County Commissioners advertised to replace it with a concrete bridge. Apparently, the cost of a concrete bridge was prohibitive since it was replaced by the present covered bridge. (This seems like a good choice since the concrete bridge replacing the downstream Armiesburg Covered Bridge in 1917 collapsed in 1930 while the Roseville Bridge still stands.)</p> <p>Jefferson P. Van Fossen received the contract to build the replacement bridge. The brothers J. P. and J. L. Van Fossen were associated with the county road department and were involved in constructing four or more Parke County covered bridges and foundations. J. P. Van Fossen was contracted the same year to build the Jessup Bridge. Witnesses from the construction site claim the on-site foreman was Joseph J. Daniels. J.J. Daniels built the 1865 covered bridge. He was 84 at the time the 1910 bridge was built.</p> <p>A photograph of the nearly finished bridge shows the portal lettering. It credits J.P. Van Fossen Contractor, J. Brooks Builder. J.J. Daniels does not appear in the photo. The onsite witnesses didn&rsquo;t remember Mr. Brooks, and later portal lettering photographs show J.J. Daniels listed as builder. The same photograph shows the sides of the bridge painted white rather than the now familiar barn red. The portal opening is the familiar &quot;Daniels Arch&quot;.</p> <p>Through the years photographs and postcards show the bridge painted red and brown. The portals have been red, brown, white, and knocked away. The transition from the J.J. Daniels arch to the present portal may have been assisted by the engraved sign boards being mounted too low, leading to the flattened arch on the latest repairs.</p> <p>Another picture shows the first stone for the 1910 bridge loaded on a horse drawn wagon. Most covered bridges built after 1900 had poured concrete abutments. The new abutments were needed for a new bridge of a different length. Stone abutments are consistent with J.J. Daniels construction while the Van Fossens used poured concrete on their other bridges.</p> <p>Doc Wheat practiced near the west bridge portal. He was a herbalist with a reputation of producing cures still unavailable to modern medicine. One of his eccentricities was his distrust of banks. After his death, his yard and house was riddled by treasure hunters searching for his Mason jars full of money.</p> <p>By the 1950&rsquo;s there were only a few homes left in Coxville and only one business, the Coxville Tavern. The tavern occupied a small log room with a stone fireplace and resembled a scene from the Snuffy Smith Comic Strip. Then Tex Terry retired from his acting career as a western villain. (He appeared in numerous movies with Roy Rogers and others.) His first retirement venture back home in Indiana was development of Mansfield.</p>
<p><strong>Built:</strong> 1908<br /> <strong>Builder:</strong> Joseph A. Britton <br /> <strong>Creek:</strong> Rock Run (was called Iron Run) <br /> <strong>Location:</strong> Located 1/2 mile northwest of Coxville. <br /> <strong>Reference Code: </strong>#19, 14-61-10, 12-61-10, dn, Florida 16-14N&mdash;8W <br /> <strong>Size:</strong> 65 ft long +8&rsquo; +8&rsquo;, 16 ft wide, 13&rsquo; clearance<br /> <strong>Truss:</strong> Burr Arch 1 span<br /> <strong>Foundation: </strong>Concrete</p> <p><strong>Bridge History: </strong>The Harry Evans Bridge was built the same year and by the same builder as the Zacke Cox and the Weisner covered bridges.</p> <p>One former neighbor of the bridge became incensed when he learned that the bridge is now called the Harry Evans Bridge. He said that Harry Evans lived on top of the hill above the bridge and it was originally named for an Evans living in the valley nearer the bridge.</p> <p>Harry Evans owned the land near the bridge. The land remained in the Evans name through the 1960&rsquo;s.&nbsp; The road near the bridge was washed out on numerous occasions. Through the years, a farmer has maintained a ford just west of the bridge.</p> <p>There are many old dangerous coal mines in the hills near the Harry Evans Bridge. There is a seemingly bottomless air shaft nearby.</p>
July 4 at Montezuma Aztec Park (765-245-2728) The Annual Independence Day Celebration Aztec Park on Saturday, July 4. 10 AM-Fire Dept. Water Ball Contest Begins and continues until Parade Line Up. 11 AM-Memorial Ceremony @ Veterans Memorial 5 PM-Parade Line Up @ Reeder Park 6 PM-Parade to Aztec Park Following Parade-Flag Ceremony Baby Contest, Little Miss and Mr. Firecracker, and Miss Independence Crowning Music, Food, Bounce Houses, Games, Vendors Dusk-Fireworks Display
<p><strong>Built: </strong>1908<br /> <strong>Builder:</strong> Joseph A. Britton <br /> <strong>Creek:</strong> Rock Run (was called Iron Run) <br /> <strong>Location: </strong>Located at Bradfield Station, 3 miles north of Coxville.<br /> <strong>Reference Code: </strong>54 feet long +9&rsquo; +9&rsquo;, 15 feet wide, 14 feet clearance <br /> <strong>Size:</strong> 54 ft long +9&rsquo; +9&rsquo;, 15 ft wide, 14 ft clearance<br /> <strong>Truss: </strong>Burr Arch 1 span<br /> <strong>Foundation:</strong> Concrete</p> <p><strong>Repair/Restoration History:</strong> Roof and deck replaced in 1989. Deck replaced in 1991 for $6,000. Restored in 2002.</p> <p><strong>Bridge History:</strong> The Zacke Cox bridge was built the same year and by the same contract as the Harry Evans Bridge and the same year as the Weisner. Although built by J.A. Britton, these three bridges do not have the traditional Britton Portal. Semi-arched, they more resemble the Hendricks portal, like Wilkens Mill, Rush Creek, and Mill Creek.</p> <p>Zachariah M. Cox was born in 1857 in Coloma. His Fatherwas E.T. Cox. The Cox family was prominent with various members owning nearly a thousand acres in Parke County near the Zacke Cox Bridge. There is a clay strip mine next to the bridge to the northwest. Coal and slate outcroppings can be seen south of the bridge.</p> <p>There was another road between the Harry Evans and Zacke Cox Bridges. It was never bridged and the ford and approaches are now abandoned. An ancient legendary Indian grave lies between the bridges, marked by a snake-like fossil. However, the hewn rock steps and the entrance are now covered by the collapsed cliff side.</p> <p>There have been many fossils uncovered by Rock Run, huge snakes are ancient tree fossils. Huge alligator-like fossils were reported north of the Zacke Cox Bridge. Fossil studies in Parke County have revealed familiar species and at least one previously unknown. In 1956, Dr. Rainer Zangerl discovered a 12 foot long shark fossil north of this site, between the Jackson, and West Union bridges. It was the first fossil discovered of the Orodus Greggi sharks. Dr. Zangerl writes that there was a shallow sea covering Parke County during the coal age, 300 million years ago, that was populated by various sharks and bony fishes.</p>
<p><strong>Built:</strong> 1873<br /> <strong>Builder:</strong> Joseph J. Daniels <br /> <strong>Creek: </strong>Big Raccoon <br /> <strong>Location:</strong> Located at Mecca. Also on &quot;Brown Route&quot; <br /> <strong>Reference Code:</strong> #21, 14-61-13, 12-61-14, ec, Wabash 20-15N&mdash;8W <br /> <strong>Size: </strong>150 ft long +13&rsquo; +13&rsquo;, 17 ft wide, 12&rsquo; 6<br /> <strong>Truss:</strong> Burr Arch 1 span<br /> <strong>Foundation: </strong>Hewn stone<br /> <strong>Original Cost:</strong> $7,650</p> <p><strong>Repair/Restoration History:</strong> Bypassed in 1965. Funded June 30, 1980 to repair cable cradles.</p> <p><strong>Bridge History:</strong> The name Mecca was originally attributed to the city in Saudi Arabia that is a center to the Moslem faith. There are two stories about how Mecca, Indiana got its name.</p> <p>An immigration of Syrian Moslems led to a settlement among the white sands and clay banks of the Big Raccoon. The settlement became known as Little Arabia or Arabia. The Arabian Church and the Arabian Cemetery were located on top of the hill, south of the Philips or Arabian Covered Bridge.</p> <p>In a second story, &quot;Arabians&quot; was a name for second class citizens thought of as scoundrels and cattle thieves.</p> <p>In either case the Arabians made trips to the larger town with a mill and stores that became known as pilgrimages. The name came from the expression, &quot;There goes another caravan of Arabs on their way to Mecca!&quot;</p> <p>Earlier, the town was called Maidstone. Alexander McCune and Samuel Lowery built a sawmill on Big Raccoon in 1832. In 1833 they built a carding mill and in 1834they added machinery for fulling cloth. Jeptha Van Vickler built a sawmill in 1835. McCune and Lowery built flatboats and packed pork for shipment to New Orleans. In 1855 they built a flour mill in the area that became known as Old Mecca. Other owners included Frank L. Batman in 1860, George Batman in 1874, and John S. Hardin in 1897 when the equipment was sold and the building converted to storage.</p> <p>When bids for the Mecca Bridge were opened, they included William Blackledge, $8,000; James Moyers, $7,800; and J.J. Daniels, $7,650. J.J. Daniels was awarded the contract.</p> <p>From 1877 through 1879 a new gravel road was constructed between Rockville and Mecca. This increased traffic across the covered bridge. Today, US 41 uses most of the same route from Rockville to the church at Bradfield Corner. The road building reduced the building of other bridges during this time period to one.</p> <p>New Mecca was built a half mile on the other side of the bridge. The Indiana Coal Railroad was built along the Big Raccoon Valley. West Mecca was started at the train station. The W.E. Dee Company operated two clay plants, started in 1895 and 1904, concurrently with the operation of the Indiana Sewer Pipe Company on the east side of Mecca. Nearly 300 were employed in these plants. A grain elevator and a steam powered sawmill were other businesses. The town population was around two thousand in 1900, a thousand in 1927, and 400 now. There were two hotels, two bakeries, a bank, a pool hall, a blacksmith shop, coal mines, a hardware store, a newspaper, four churches, etc. The Mecca Historical Society bought, moved, and restored a schoolhouse near the west end of the bridge. At Christmas, the bridge and schoolhouse are decorated. Christmas caroling is held in the bridge. A sunrise service is held in the bridge on Easter.</p> <p>The bridge survived the floods of 1875, 1913, 1957, and 1990. The water rose above the floor in July 1957 and 1990. In another flood, two families waited it out inside the bridge, confident in J.J. Daniel&rsquo;s construction.</p>
<p><strong>Built: </strong>1909<br /> <strong>Builder: </strong>Joseph A. Britton <br /> <strong>Creek:</strong> Big Pond Creek (also called Rocky Run) <br /> <strong>Location:</strong> Located 5 miles west of Rockville, south of US 36, and 1 1/2 mile southwest of Coloma. <br /> <strong>Reference Code: </strong>#22, 14-61-12, 12-61-13, ea, Wabash 5-15N&mdash;8W <br /> <strong>Size:</strong> 43 ft long +9&rsquo; +9&rsquo;, 16 ft wide, 14&rsquo; clearance<br /> <strong>Truss: </strong>Multiple king posts (no arch) 1 span<br /> <strong>Foundation: </strong>Concrete</p> <p><strong>Repair/Restoration History:</strong> Reroofed, resided, and repainted in 1991 for $7,000.</p> <p><strong>Bridge History: </strong>Also known as &quot;Arabia Bridge&quot;</p> <p>Little Arabia was an area on top of the hill bordered by Big Pond, Leatherwood, and Big Raccoon Creeks. The name may have come from Syrian Moslem immigrants who settled nearby or as a term of derision for residents who were thought of as little more than cattle thieves.</p> <p>The Arabia Church was built on the hill above the covered bridge. The adjacent Arabia Cemetery remains but the church is now only a step, foundation, and shards of stained glass. Many of the headstones are inscribed &quot;Phillips&quot;, indicating that the Philips family were prominent residents near the bridge.</p> <p>The Phillips Bridge shared its heritage with the Weisner Bridge, also built by J. A. Britton, in the previous year. Both bridges had a four segment King Post truss (Burr Arch without an arch). The Weisner Bridge was the shortest county owned bridge until it was washed away in 1957. Now, the Phillips Covered Bridge is the shortest Parke County Covered Bridge.</p> <p>The west, downstream truss has been reinforced with an iron beam, but the Phillips Bridge is still in use.</p>
<p><strong>Built:</strong> 1883<br /> <strong>Builder:</strong> Joseph A. Britton <br /> <strong>Creek: </strong>Leatherwood Creek <br /> <strong>Location:</strong> Located 2 miles southeast of Montezuma, or 6 miles west of Rockville. <br /> <strong>Reference Code: </strong>#23, 14-61-14, 12-61-15, eg, Wabash 5-15N&mdash;8W <br /> <strong>Size: </strong>84 ft long +9&rsquo; +9&rsquo;, 16 ft wide, 14&rsquo; clearance<br /> <strong>Truss:</strong> Burr Arch 1 span<br /> <strong>Foundation: </strong>Red sandstone<br /> <strong>Original Cost:</strong> $3,200</p> <p><strong>Repair/Restoration History: </strong>Alternate route open in 1930&rsquo;s. Roof replaced in 1989.</p> <p><strong>Bridge History:</strong> Also known as &quot;Leatherwood Ford&quot;</p> <p>The Parke County Commissioners requested that Joseph J. Daniels prepare plans and estimates for a covered bridge at Leatherwood Ford. J.J. Daniels estimated the cost $3,801.</p> <p>When bids were solicited, four iron bridge companies submitted bids in addition to J.A. Britton and J.J. Daniels: Wrought Iron Bridge Co. Canton Ohio - $17.95 per timber foot; Indianapolis Bridge Co. - $17.00 per timber foot; King Bridge Co. - $16.48 per timber foot; South Bridge Co. - $16.65 per timber foot; J.J. Daniels - $3,500.00 complete; J.A. Britton - $1,700.00 superstructure, $1,500 stonework. The contract was awarded to J.A. Britton for $3,200.</p> <p>This was J.A. Britton&rsquo;s third Parke County Bridge. The first, at Billie Creek, was probably an open bridge. He built the Narrows Covered Bridge, in 1882. The craftsmanship at the top of the arch of the Narrows Bridge has been remarked upon as primitive as compared to those of J.J. Daniels. The arch of the Sim Smith bridge is clearly composed of incompletely cut segments. In later bridges J.A. Britton&rsquo;s craftsmanship and attention to detail exceeded that of J.J. Daniels, possibly as compensation for these early bridges. This bridge has a reputation for being haunted. In one story from 1890 many have waited on one side of the bridge for the horse and buggy they hear approaching from the other side. It never appears, even though they leave the buggy to look for it. In another story two husky high school students investigated the story at night after a school play rehearsal. At first they found nothing more than a glow worm. Then on the other side they both saw an Indian carrying a papoose. She was about 8 feet tall. They ran to their car but when they roared through the bridge in the car she was gone.</p> <p>The Sim Smith Bridge was named for a nearby landowner, Simeon Smith. He lived in the county from 1885. The Smith family has retained the same property through 1990. The now abandoned B&amp;O Railroad branch ran through the Sim Smith property and near the bridge.</p> <p>The Sim Smith Bridge has one &quot;Britton Portal&quot; and one &quot;Daniels Portal&quot;. Joseph A. Britton originally built it with his trademark openings, but the North end was modified into the &quot;Daniels arched portal&quot; in a later repair.</p> <p>This bridge was on the Pikes Peak route along with Billie Creek, Howard, and Hollandsburg. When US 36 was surveyed in the 1920&rsquo;s the Sim Smith Bridge was saved by the rerouting of the highway. It is still in use.</p>
<p><strong>Built:</strong> 1896<br /> <strong>Builder: </strong>Joseph J. Daniels <br /> <strong>Creek:</strong> Leatherwood Creek <br /> <strong>Location: </strong>Located 1 1/2 miles east of Montezuma near Klondyke. <br /> <strong>Reference Code:</strong> #24, 14-61-26, 12-61-29, pe, Reserve 31-16N&mdash;8W <br /> <strong>Size:</strong> 83 ft long +7&rsquo; +7&rsquo;, 16 ft wide, 12&rsquo; 6<br /> <strong>Truss:</strong> Burr Arch 1 span<br /> <strong>Foundation: </strong>Hewn limestone &amp; shale and poured concrete</p> <p><strong>Bridge History:</strong> Also known as &quot;Klondyke Bridge,&quot; &quot;Marion Bridge,&quot; and &quot;Leatherwood Bridge.&quot;</p> <p>The name Marion Bridge came from the Marion Brick Plant. The bridge may have been built to provide road access from Montezuma, 2 miles west. The brick plant closed in the early 1920&rsquo;s.</p> <p>It was called Leatherwood Bridge but this is confusing with Leatherwood Station, and Leatherwood Ford. Klondyke was the name of the community near the bridge. It was named after the Klondyke Gold Rush, but here, it was a clay rush to the Marion Brick Plant.</p> <p>Melcher was the name of the railroad station. Two lines of the B&amp;O Railroad crossed west of the bridge. Though built by Joseph J. Daniels, this bridge does not now have the trademark Daniels Arch. The portal has been changed to look more like those built by William Hendricks and Joseph A. Britton on their shorter bridges.</p> <p>The abutments were originally made of hewn limestone and shale that appear similar to nearby stones in the creek. The shale has crumbled and concrete was poured around the original stone. The roof is of wood shingles.</p> <p>The portal lettering includes &quot;R.A. Myers, J. Huxford, T.A. Kerr - Commissioners, J.A. Britton - Builder, S.A. Pike -Auditor, W.M. Rawlings - Treasurer, J.T. Campbell - Engineer, 1899. Cross this bridge at a walk.&quot;</p>
<p><strong>Built: </strong>1899, moved 1981<br /> <strong>Builder:</strong> Joseph A. Britton, moved &amp; rebuilt by Elmer Buchta <br /> <strong>Creek: </strong>Leatherwood Creek, moved to Williams Creek <br /> <strong>Location: </strong>Located 4 miles northwest of Rockville, 2 1/2 miles southwest of Bloomingdale. Moved to Billie Creek Village August 12, 1981.&nbsp; <br /> <strong>Reference Code:</strong> #25, 14-61-25, 12-61-28, pb, Reserve 21-16N&mdash;8W Moved to Adams 8-15N&mdash;7W <br /> <strong>Size:</strong> 72 ft long +9&rsquo; +9&rsquo;, 16 ft wide, 14 ft clearance<br /> <strong>Truss:</strong> Burr Arch 1 span<br /> <strong>Foundation:</strong> Sandstone block, moved to concrete with sandstone showing.<br /> <strong>Original Cost:</strong> less than $680, moving cost $50,000</p> <p><strong>Bridge History:</strong> Also known as &quot;Harry Wolf Bridge&quot;</p> <p>Leatherwood Station was northwest of the Leatherwood Station Bridge. It was named for the creek and the railroad station on the B &amp; 0 Railroad. Samuel N. Baker started a pottery business there in 1826, making red ware. In 1830, Samuel Kelly built an oil mill nearby. That area was called Factory Town, but after a potters shop was opened in 1867, it was called Potters Town. Next, to the east, was a hamlet called Java, named for a brand of coffee. Bloomingdale, started in 1825 or 1826 was located next to the east.</p> <p>The bridge was named for the town on the creek and railroad. Harry Wolf owned the land near the bridge and many called the bridge by his name.</p> <p>Although the bridge was built by Joseph A. Britton the portal was modified into a Joseph J. Daniels Arch, while the framing for an angular Britton portal can be seen from the inside.</p> <p>According to a letter by Joseph J. Daniels dated May 18, 1899, he bid $680 to build this bridge. The contract was awarded to Joseph A. Britton for a lesser amount.</p> <p>The Leatherwood Station Bridge was moved to Billie Creek Village on August 12, 1981. It is now an attraction at the village: open only to foot, horse, and wagon traffic.</p>
All day programs featuring old-time crafts, and information about our pioneer, and primitive past. Contact the Turkey Run State Park Nature Center for more information: 765-597-2654
<p><strong>Built: </strong>1876<br /> <strong>Builder:</strong> Joseph J. Daniels<br /> <strong>Creek: </strong>Sugar Creek<br /> <strong>Location:</strong> Located north of West Union.<br /> <strong>Reference Code:</strong> #26, 14-61 -27, 12-61 -30, pr, Reserve 6-16N&mdash;8W<br /> <strong>Size:</strong> 315 ft long +10&rsquo; +17&rsquo;, 17 ft wide, 14&rsquo;6<br /> <strong>Truss:</strong> Double Burr Arch, 2 spans<br /> <strong>Foundation:</strong> Hewn stone<br /> <strong>Original Cost: </strong>$16,125 or $8,900</p> <p><strong>Repair/Restoration History: </strong>Third covered bridge at this site. Star Mills and Harrison Bridges preceded. After the flood of 1913, the abutments were damaged and required $7,000 for repair. New south approach of poured concrete was constructed in 1931. Bypassed in 1964. Abutments were repaired to protect new bridge for $223,367 +$5,000.<br /> <br /> <strong>Bridge History: </strong>The West Union Bridge was constructed following damages to the Harrison Bridge in 1876. The Harrison Bridge may have still been standing while the West Union Bridge was constructed. The Parke County Commissioners expressed their faith in Joseph J. Daniels in contracting with him to build a third bridge at this site. The West Union Bridge was completed in September, 1876.<br /> <br /> The West Union Bridge is the longest remaining Parke County Covered Bridge. (The Clinton Bridge, was 730 feet long.)<br /> <br /> More water passes under this bridge near the mouth of Sugar Creek than any of the other remaining covered bridges. Earlier, narrower abutments were damaged in 1866 and 1875. The West Union Bridge is longer than the two preceding bridges but the newer abutments were also damaged and repaired in 1913 and 1931.<br /> <br /> The West Union Bridge and its predecessors were used for stage coach traffic to Lafayette, as was the Armiesburg Bridge. They were on the route of the &quot;Indiana State Highway&quot;, which was established by the Legislature in 1827 and was to extend from Fort Wayne to Terre Haute.<br /> <br /> The Wabash and Erie Canal was east of this bridge. There were two or more connections with Sugar Creek to allow access to upstream shipping sources which include Rockport. There are other references to a canal aqueduct which may have been used for pedestrian traffic during high water after the canal was abandoned. The B&amp;O Railroad crossed the Lafayette Road just south of the West Union Bridge and crossed Sugar Creek east of the bridge.</p> <p>The West Union Bridge has a noticeable arch consistent with the Burr Arches. Other covered bridges were built with this arch, which settled straight when weight was applied. The south portal has a Daniels Arch, while the north portal is now squared off. The roof is brown painted metal.</p>
The is a great opportunity to shop or sell.<br /> <br /> To reserve a space call 765-569-7442 or 765-569-2605.<br /> www.rockvillemainstreet.com
<p><strong>Built:</strong> 1861<br /> <strong>Builder:</strong> Joseph J. Daniels contracted by William D. Daniels <br /> <strong>Creek: </strong>Sugar Creek <br /> <strong>Location:</strong> Located 2 1/2 miles northwest of Annapolis, near Bridge, and in the forgotten town of Rockport. Also on &quot;Blue Route&quot; <br /> <strong>Reference Code:</strong> #28, 14-61-28, 12-61-31, ps, Penn 35-17N&mdash;8W <br /> <strong>Size:</strong> 207 ft long +9&rsquo; +9&rsquo;, 16 ft wide, 18 ft clearance<br /> <strong>Truss: </strong>Double Burr Arch, double king post, 1 span<br /> <strong>Foundation: </strong>Hewn stone, $6,000.00 by Brown and Company<br /> <strong>Original Cost:</strong> $8,000 plus subscriptions</p> <p><strong>Repair/Restoration History:</strong> Repaired, inspected, and bolts tightened in 1863 by J.J. Daniels. Repaired, resided, and reroofed after damages by 1913 flood. Restored in 1977 for $75,000.</p> <p><strong>Bridge History: </strong>Also known as &quot;Rockport Bridge&quot; and &quot;Wright&rsquo;s Mill Bridge&quot;</p> <p>A flour mill was built in 1848 by Prior Wright at &quot;Devils Den&quot; after his mill at the Narrows had been washed away by a freshet on New Years Day, 1847. Flatboats were constructed here and loaded for the trip to New Orleans, floating over the shallows of Sugar Creek during high water. More business originated here during the operation of the Wabash &amp; Erie Canal.</p> <p>The mill, general store, cooper shop, blacksmith shop, two sawmills, and four dwelling houses made up the town of Rockport.. An iron smelter operated for a while using a poor grade of iron ore but plentiful and high grade coke made from local coal.</p> <p>Before the Jackson Bridge was built the upper and lower fords were used. The upper ford was some distance below the mill dam. The lower ford was 20 rods west of the bridge site. The mill dam washed out in 1882, and the mill was dynamited in 1894.</p> <p>A special Parke County Commissioners meeting was held on December 28,1860. It was called by Dr. Hobbs on behalf of &quot;several citizens who had presented a petition for a bridge over Sugar Creek at Wright&rsquo;s Upper Mills.&quot; At the same meeting, John Scott &quot;presented on behalf of various citizens a petition and subscriptions for a bridge at Star Mills.&quot;</p> <p>At another special commissioners meeting on January 1,1861, both petitions were approved. A sum of $8,000 was approved for each site &quot;. ..provided the citizens would make up enough subscriptions to make up the balance on the cost of these two bridges.&quot; Byers, Milligan, Graham, and Elwood Hadley were the petition leaders at a January 17, 1861 meeting. A total of $3,307 and 300 signatures had been collected. James Johnson and Henry Wolf were appointed by the commissioners to select the site for the bridge, establish specifications and to provide an estimate.</p> <p>In 1859 the commissioners had received a letter from Joseph J. Daniels on behalf of William D. Daniels proposing the two bridges at Wright&rsquo;s Mill and Star Mills. In the March, 1861, meeting, bids were opened, and the contract awarded to William D. Daniels. On April 22 the contracts were signed and filed and a $1,000 advance allowed. By September 16, 1861, the masonry work for the abutments was complete and W.D. Daniels was paid $6,000 for the work subcontracted to Brown and Company. The abutments contained an unusual &quot;cornerstone&quot; on the south upstream side reading &quot;Builder J.J. Daniels 1861&quot;. The Jackson Bridge was ready for final inspection by the County Commissioners on November 9,1861. On November 11,1861, he was paid $1,500 on the Jackson Contract and an additional amount of $2,500. The Star Mills Bridge was completed in December, 1861.</p> <p>The Jackson Covered Bridge is the oldest standing bridge built by Joseph J. Daniels in Parke County. It is not, however, his first bridge since he worked with his father, Stephen Daniels, and had completed some of his contracts. He finished the first of his own building contracts in 1845 at age 19. He built the Hargrave Bridge in 1847 and the Union Township Bridge in 1851 in Parke County.</p> <p>The bridge was built in the unstable political era of the Civil War. Joseph J. Daniels made a clear political statement in naming the bridge after Andrew Jackson in honor of his statement to John Calhoun: &quot;To the Union, it must be preserved.&quot; When first built, the bridge portal was lettered: &quot;The Federal Union: It must be preserved.&quot;&nbsp;&nbsp;</p>
<p><strong>Built: </strong>1917<br /> <strong>Builder:</strong> Joseph A. Britton <strong><br /> Creek:</strong> Rush Creek <br /> <strong>Location:</strong> Located 2 1/2 miles southwest of Tangier. <strong><br /> Reference Code: </strong>#29, 14-61 -32, 12-61 -35, rd, Liberty 28-17N&mdash;8W Size: 56 ft long +9<br /> <strong>Truss: </strong>Burr Arch 1 span<br /> <strong>Foundation: </strong>Concrete</p> <p><strong>Bridge History: </strong>This bridge has nothing to do with the town of Marshall, located many miles away. It may have been named after a local resident, Mahlon Marshall. Mahlon Marshall was a Civil War veteran and was a Parke County Commissioner when the Parke County Courthouse was built. It is more likely that it was named for David W, Marshall who owned the Hill Crest Valley Farm of 132 acres nearby.</p> <p>The Brazil Division of the C&amp;EI Railroad passed near the bridge. The railroad went bankrupt in 1921, and, the railroad was scrapped out in 1943.</p> <p>This structure was the next to the last of the J.A. Britton and the Parke County Covered Bridges. J.A. Britton was 80 the year it was constructed.&nbsp;</p>
Gourdfarm in rural Tangier. Annual gourd festival with classes and information on everything GOURD! No admission charge. Contact Helen (Sandlady) at 765-498-5428 for more information.
<p><strong>Built: </strong>1904<br /> <strong>Builder: </strong>William Hendricks <br /> <strong>Creek: </strong>Rush Creek <br /> <strong>Location:</strong> Located 1 1/2 miles south of Tangier. <br /> <strong>Reference Code:</strong> #30, 14-61-31, 12-61 -34, re, Liberty 22-17N&mdash;8W <br /> <strong>Size:</strong> 77 ft long +9&rsquo; +9&rsquo;, 16 ft wide, 12&rsquo; 6<br /> <strong>Truss:</strong> Burr Arch 1 span<br /> <strong>Foundation:</strong> Cut stone</p> <p><strong>Bridge History:</strong> Levees have been installed and the nearby Fairview Church moved because of the violent floods. This is the first of three bridges built by William Hendricks. It was followed by Wilkins Mill, in 1906 and Earl Ray in 1907. All three are of similar construction. The portals have an extremely shallow arch. The bridge name is the same as the creek.</p> <p>Nearby Tangier was preceded by a grain warehouse built in 1855 by William B. Swaim. (Later it was operated by his son, S.B. Swaim, and burned in 1931.) The town was organized and platted on March 16, 1886, after the Brazil Division of the Chicago and Eastern Illinois Railroad was built. The railroad passed the Rush Creek Covered Bridge. The railroad went bankrupt in 1921, was sold in 1922, was closed in 1941, and was scrapped out in 1943.</p> <p>The Post Office was open from 1886 to 1990. Other businesses and buildings included a flour mill, hardware store, hotel, three doctors, three groceries, implement store, harness shop, millinery shop, two barbers, two blacksmiths, sawmill, drug store, three churches, Odd Fellows Lodge, canning factory, telephone company, depot, and schools.</p> <p>The population of Tangier was reported as 300 in 1913, 300 in 1927, and 100 in 1990. As clay and coal mines closed, jobs, and population decreased.</p> <p>The name Tangier was given by the town&rsquo;s surveyor, Captain John T. Campbell. He may have chosen it as a result of his earlier visit to Tangier, Morocco, in Africa. Other names for the town include Long Siding, Liberty Crossing, Swaim&rsquo;s Station, and even Sylvania.</p> <p>Joseph J. Daniels built the Neet Bridge over Little Raccoon Creek, the same year.</p>
<p><strong>Built: </strong>1907<br /> <strong>Builder:</strong> William Hendricks; D. M. Brown, Contractor <br /> <strong>Creek:</strong> (Wabash) Mill Creek <br /> <strong>Location:</strong> Located 2 1/2 miles southwest of Tangier. <br /> <strong>Reference Code:</strong> #31, 14-61 -29, 12-61 -32, ra, Liberty 19-17N&mdash;8W <br /> <strong>Size: </strong>92 ft long +10&rsquo; +10&rsquo;, 15 ft wide, 15&rsquo; clearance<br /> <strong>Truss:</strong> Burr Arch 1 span<br /> <strong>Foundation:</strong> Concrete and wood and<br /> <strong>Original Cost:</strong> $2,520 or less</p> <p><strong>Bridge History: </strong>Also known as &quot;Thompson&rsquo;s Ford,&quot; &quot;Tow Path Bridge,&quot; and &quot;Earl Ray Bridge.&quot;</p> <p>The (Wabash) Mill Creek is sometimes confused with Sugar Mill Creek. The first name is from the creek. The site was called Thompson&rsquo;s Ford when the bridge was built. The Wabash &amp; Erie Canal was close by leading to the name Tow Path Bridge. Canal boats were towed by mules walking on the tow path along side of the canal. Earl Ray was a nearby prominent citizen. He was well known as an auctioneer. Nearby, an aqueduct, a bridge for water crossing over another stream, for the Wabash &amp; Erie Canal was occasionally used as a bridge after the canal was drained.</p> <p>In a May 18,1899, letter, Joseph J. Daniels bid $1,485.00 for the superstructure or $2,520 total for the bridge. Since D.M. Brown was awarded the contract, his bid was apparently for less. D.M, Brown had so much trouble starting the bridge, that he hired the more experienced William Hendricks to direct the construction.</p> <p>Russel&rsquo;s Mill was located between the covered bridges on Mill Creek. It was built by Joseph Thompson in 1829. It was small, with wheat flour at first ground by hand. The first dam was made by dropping a large poplar tree across the creek. It lasted 20 years. Kinworthy operated the mill as did Thomas Cachatt. Later owners were Jerry Kemp, Joseph Russell, Gephart Bannon, Rhubottom, and J.C. Ward, in 1880. J.C. Ward added steam power and combined a sawmill with the flour mill. The dam washed out in 1888 and was not rebuilt. Now nothing remains of the village.</p> <p>Due to rot at the ends of the arches, additional wood and &quot;I&quot; beam supports have been placed at each end of the bridge.</p> <p>The abutment has also been supplemented on the northeast side with a wood pile wall. The creek is violently washing out a new bed and seems to be moving east of the bridge.</p>
<p><strong>Built: </strong>1915<br /> <strong>Builder: </strong>Eugene Britton; Elmer Garrard, Contractor <br /> <strong>Creek:</strong> (Wabash) Mill Creek <br /> <strong>Location: </strong>Located 2 miles northwest of Tangier <br /> <strong>Reference Code:</strong> #32, 14-61 -33, 12-61 -36, rh, Liberty 8-7N&mdash;8W <br /> <strong>Size:</strong> 72 ft long +10&rsquo; +10&rsquo;, 16 ft wide, 13&rsquo; 6<br /> <strong>Truss: </strong>Burr Arch 1 span<br /> <strong>Foundation:</strong> Concrete</p> <p><strong>Bridge History:</strong> Elmer Garrard was awarded the contract to construct the Bowsher Ford Bridge. Apparently he needed the expertise of the Britton family to complete the job. Eugene Britton, Joseph A. Button&rsquo;s son, was hired and is credited as builder. Joseph A. Britton, Lawrence Britton, and family were constructing the Jeffries Ford Covered Bridge, across Big Raccoon Creek; Rolling Stone Covered Bridge, Putnam County across Big Walnut Creek; and Sharpe Covered Bridge, Putnam County across Mill Creek, the same year.</p> <p>Elmer Garrard submitted a bid for the Nevins Covered Bridge in 1920, competing with the Britton family. The bridge was named for the ford at that site. The ford was named for the Bowsher family who owned the land around the ford. The bridge has a wood shingle roof. A full scale covered bridge replica is being used as a farm shed 1/4 mile southwest of the Bowsher Ford Bridge.</p> <p>The Bowsher Ford Covered Bridge is the same approximate size and configuration as the Big Rocky Fork Bridge, built by Joseph J. Daniels in 1900. In contrast, the Big Rocky Fork Bridge has a stone abutment and a &quot;J. J. Daniels arched portal.&quot;</p>
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<p><strong>Built: </strong>1906<br /> <strong>Builder: </strong>William Hendricks <br /> <strong>Creek: </strong>Sugar Mill Creek (now dry bed) <br /> <strong>Location:</strong> Located east of US 41, north of Indiana Highway 47, and 1/2 mile northwest of Turkey Run State Park. <br /> <strong>Reference Code:</strong> #35, 14-61-35, 12-61-38, sh, Sugar Creek 20-17N&mdash;7W <br /> <strong>Size: </strong>102 ft long +9&rsquo; +9&rsquo;, 16 ft wide, 13 ft clearance<br /> <strong>Truss:</strong> Burr Arch 1 span<br /> <strong>Foundation:</strong> Concrete</p> <p><strong>Repair/Restoration History:</strong> Reroofed and resided in 1991 for $6,000.</p> <p><strong>Bridge History:</strong> Wilkins Mill was built in 1835 by Solomon Jessup and Zimri Hunt. James Moore and Zimri Hunt&rsquo;s log barn and house are up the hill south of the bridge.</p> <p>George Wilkins opened a store there in 1853. A carding mill was operated there by Solomon Jessup and William Hunt.</p> <p>The mill was sold to George Wilkins in 1855. He tore down the old mill and built a new one. This was the source of the name Wilkins Mill. This mill burned down in 1877. A new mill was built, which stood until 1947.</p> <p>Sugar Mill and Green Creek converged below the bridge site. After one flood, the creek changed course leaving the bridge over a dry bed for a period of time. Parke County creeks are still changing course as they have for thousands of years. An eighty-five year old covered bridge won&rsquo;t make a difference. The creeks will go where they wish.</p> <p>This is the second of three covered bridges built by William Hendricks.</p>
<p><strong>Built:</strong> 1913<br /> <strong>Builder:</strong> Joseph A. Britton <br /> <strong>Creek:</strong> Sugar Creek <br /> <strong>Location:</strong> Located east of US 41, north of Indiana 47, and west of Turkey Run State Park. <br /> <strong>Reference Code:</strong> #36, 14-61 -34, 12-61 -37, sg, Sugar Creek 28/29-17N&mdash;7W <br /> <strong>Size:</strong> 176 ft long +8&rsquo; +8&rsquo;, 16 ft wide, 13&rsquo; clearance<br /> <strong>Truss: </strong>Burr Arch 1 span<br /> <strong>Foundation:</strong> $385 Concrete on top of stone block<br /> <strong>Original Cost:</strong> $4,235</p> <p><strong>Repair/Restoration History:</strong> Replaced iron bridge, built in 1896, destroyed by flood in 1913. Deck replaced in 1975 by County Highway Department.</p> <p><strong>Bridge History:</strong> Cox Ford was not bridged until 1896. When the County Commissioners advertised for bids, they received lower bids from J.J. Daniels and J.A. Britton, but they chose a more expensive iron bridge. Iron Bridges were &quot;modern&quot;.</p> <p>The iron bridge was washed away in the flood of 1913. The Armiesburg, the Plank Road, and the Hargrave covered bridges were destroyed in the same flood. A contract for a replacement covered bridge at Cox Ford was awarded to J.A. Britton. His bid was contingent on the reuse of the Armiesburg Covered Bridge arches and the iron bridge abutments. He raised the level of the bridge another 5 feet. Today, the abutments are in two segments with 5 feet of poured concrete placed on top of the original hewn stone.</p> <p>The arches from the Armiesburg Bridge may have been sawn by Charlton Britton, Joseph A. Button&rsquo;s father. His sons, including Edgar Britton, probably also assisted in the construction.</p> <p>Joseph A. Britton built the Howard Bridge, at the Plank Road site and the State Sanatorium Bridge, the same year. (The Armiesburg Bridge was replaced with a concrete bridge.)</p> <p>Although the water below the Cox Ford Bridge now looks shallow, several very large catfish were pulled out of there. Winfield Catlin and James C. Buchanen went fishing there on June 2,1920. Mr. Catlin probed the water with a long stick under the larger rocks. He found a large one and called to Mr. Buchanen. Mr. Buchanen immediately tumbled into the water from a 12 to 15 foot cliff (in a new suit of clothes) and tried to &quot;hog&quot; the fish. In the lively struggle both men&rsquo;s hands were cut as they reached into the fish mouth and tried to drag it out of the water. Their trophy fish weighed 47 pounds.</p> <p>They placed the fish in the car and took it to the Rockville Republican newspaper office. They said it wasn&rsquo;t unusual, they had caught them up to 75 pounds.</p> <p>Turkey Run State Park now extends past the Cox Ford Covered Bridge. A public parking lot and a canoe landing are located southwest of the bridge.</p>
<p><strong>Built: </strong>1882<br /> <strong>Builder:</strong> Joseph A. Britton <br /> <strong>Creek:</strong> Sugar Creek <br /> <strong>Location:</strong> Located on east side of Turkey Run State Park, next to Lusk Mill site. <br /> <strong>Reference Code: </strong>#37, 14-61 -36, 12-61-39, sm, Sugar Creek 27/26-17N&mdash;7W <br /> <strong>Size:</strong> 121 ft long +8&rsquo; +8&rsquo;, 16 ft 6 in wide, 12&rsquo; 6<br /> <strong>Truss:</strong> Burr Arch 1 span<br /> <strong>Foundation:</strong> Hewn stone<br /> <strong>Original Cost:</strong> $3,400</p> <p><strong>Repair/Restoration History: </strong>Replaced Salmon Lusk&rsquo;s Bridges of 1840-1847 and 1847-1875. Bypassed 1960. Rebuilt in 1977 by State of Indiana Department of Natural Resources.</p> <p><strong>Bridge History: </strong>The previous Lusk Bridge was destroyed in 1875. When the Parke County Commissioners decided to replace the bridge, iron bridges were becoming popular. The first bids, opened on August 24,1882, included: Smith Iron Works - $13.00, $15.50, $21.00 per lineal foot; Wrought Iron Bridge Co. - $20.00, $21.65 per lineal foot; King Iron Bridge Co. - $21.20 per lineal foot; Columbia Bridge Works - $24.00 per lineal foot; G.F. Haynes (Wood) - $20.00 per lineal foot; J.A. Britton (Wood) - $3,750 total. All Bids were rejected.</p> <p>J.A. Britton was later awarded the contract for $3400. This bridge has been acclaimed as the first in J.A. Button&rsquo;s illustrious covered bridge career. Some purists have criticized the pointed arch joints, J. A. Britton built a Billie Creek Bridge in 1880, but it was probably an open bridge.</p> <p>Joseph A. Button&rsquo;s first wife died as he was working on the Narrows Bridge. He met his second wife, who was living at a farm not far from the narrows, while working on the bridge.</p> <p>The Narrows bridge is one of the most photographed covered bridges in the state. It is accessible from a public road, three Turkey Run State Park hiking trails, and canoe trips on Sugar Creek. The famous bridges of Turkey Run include two covered bridges still standing over Sugar Creek: Narrows, and Cox Ford. There were three earlier bridges at the Narrows and the Turkey Run Bridge, located near Indiana Highway 47 and the Turkey Run State Park entrance. Then there is the famous swinging bridge over Sugar Creek.</p> <p>Sugar Creek was once called Rock River because of its size and rocks. The Pottawatomie Indians called it Pungosecone which may be translated as &quot;the waters of many sugar trees&quot; or &quot;ashes at mouth of stream&quot;.</p>
Built: 1906, moved 1979 Builder: Frankfort Construction Co., moved by Buchta Trucking Creek: Big Raccoon, moved to Williams Creek Location: Originally located 1 mile northwest of Marshall on County Road 216. Moved to Billie Creek Village on US 36. Reference Code: 14-61-24. 12-61-27, nw, Washington 5.4-16N—7W moved to Adams 8-15N--7W Size: 55 ft long, 16 ft wide. 12'6" clearance Truss: Burr Arch 1 span Foundation: Concrete, moved to concrete, reset on creosoted wood Original Cost: moving cost $20,000 Repair/Restoration History: Closed in 1974. Damaged by arson fires August 9, 1979 and August 15, 1979. Moved by flood 1989. Repainted 1990. Bridge History: The Beeson Covered Bridge could have been called the Marshall Covered Bridge since it was located closest to that city. However, another bridge had been called Marshall even though it was across the county and had no relation to the town. This bridge was located near land now owned by the Beeson family for over a hundred years. William H Beeson, born in 1879 owned 53 acres by the bridge in 1920. The Beeson log cabin, built in 1835 was located nearby. The Beeson Cabin was moved to Billie Creek Village in 1969 and preserved. The Beeson Covered Bridge was also moved back into proximity to the cabin eleven years later.In 1969 the Beeson Bridge was closed after the abutments were declared unsafe This also closed a major route to Turkey Run High School and State Park as well as to emergency equipment.Another nearby concrete county bridge collapsed in March 1979, further blocking access in and out of Marshall and the school and park The Roaring Creek Citizens Association (RCCA) was organized to correct the road blockages caused by the damaged bridges. The association announced at a meeting at Turkey Run High School on August 9. 1979, that they had secured two million dollars to remove and replace the Beeson Bridge. The funding included 80% from the federal government. 20% from the county and a commitment from the US Army to use helicopters to remove the covered bridge. Steve DePlanty, president of the RCCA said they had received no cooperation from Parke County Incorporated, which had passed up two previous opportunities to remove the bridge. At 11:47 P.M. August 9, 1947 after the meeting, a fire was reported at the Beeson Bridge. The Marshall Fire Department fought the fire from the south while the Bloomingdale Fire Department fought it from the north. The fire was clearly a case of arson, with a smell of fuel oil still present the following day. It was investigated by the County Sheriff. State Police and State Fire Marshall Departments, and as a registered national land mark, the FBI may have also had jurisdictionThe RCCA denied any connection to the fire. DePlanty felt that someone had taken advantage of the meeting and threatened legal action against those claiming the RCCA was responsible for the fire. A second arson attempt was made on the bridge on Wednesday August 15, 1979, shortly after midnight Bill Connerly, who lived nearby, saw someone at the bridge, heard someone turn around in his driveway, later saw flames, and reported the fire. The Marshall Fire Department arrived to find the floor covered with flames that were starting up the wails. Nevertheless, they were able to quickly extinguish them. Buchta Trucking began moving the Beeson Bridge on December 4, 1979. They removed the roofing and siding before transporting the bridge. The covered bridge replaced the entrance footbridge at Billie Creek Village. The $20,000-$38,000 cost was shared between Billie Creek Village and Parke County Incorporated.
<p><strong>Built:</strong> 1895<br /> <strong>Builder:</strong> Joseph J. Daniels <br /> <strong>Creek:</strong> Williams Creek <br /> <strong>Location:</strong> Located east of Rockville in Billie Creek Village. <br /> <strong>Reference Code:</strong> #39, 14-61-19, 12-61-20, fw, Adams 8-15N&mdash;7W <br /> <strong>Size:</strong> 62 ft long +8&rsquo; +8&rsquo;, 15 ft wide, 12&rsquo;6<br /> <strong>Truss:</strong> Burr Arch 1 span<br /> <strong>Foundation:</strong> Cut sandstone, built by J.L. Van Fossen<br /> <strong>Original Cost:</strong> $820</p> <p><strong>Repair/Restoration History: </strong>Replaced bridge built by J. A. Britton in 1880.</p> <p><strong>Bridge History:</strong> The Billie Creek Bridge was named for the nickname of the creek. This bridge replaced an earlier one constructed by J.A. Britton in 1880. That bridge is thought to have been an open bridge, which deteriorated rapidly because of lack of covering.</p> <p>Joseph A . Button also bid on this bridge. The bids for the superstructure included J.J. Daniels, $820; and J.A. Britton $845.</p> <p>The abutments were handled separately. They were constructed by J.L. Van Fossen out of cut sandstone. The sandstone was cut and hauled from A.E. Fuel&rsquo;s quarry less than a mile away.</p> <p>The Daniels - Van Fossen association continued with the construction of the replacement Roseville Covered Bridge, in 1910. J.P. Van Fossen was the contractor, while J.J, Daniels was purported to be the onsite foreman. All three of the Van Fossen Bridges closely resemble the J.J, Daniels bridge patterns, including the &quot;Daniels Arched Portal&quot;.</p> <p>The bridge was on the Pikes Peak, Plank Road, and Ocean to Ocean Road that became US 36. Like the Sim Smith Bridge, it was saved by rerouting the highway and was not destroyed as were Howard, and Hollandsburg.</p> <p>A tourist attraction was constructed by moving and restoring local historic buildings near the bridge site. Billie Creek Village now includes a historic church, school, general store, governor&rsquo;s home, barn, and other features. The Beeson Covered Bridge, and the Leatherwood Station Bridge, have been moved near this site.</p> <p>Today, the Billie Creek Bridge is intermittently opened and closed for traffic control. When closed, school buses must make a detour of over 2 miles on their assigned route. When Billie Creek Village is open during Covered Bridge Festivals, evenings, and weekends, the Billie Creek Bridge is usually closed until the overflow parking lot is needed and opened.</p>
<p>One, Two, and Three bedroom apartments on Raccoon Lake. Queen size beds in each bedroom and pull out queen size in living room. Pool, decks with lake/woods view with swing, table and grill. Kitchens include full size refrigerator, stove and microwave plus small appliances.<o:p></o:p></p> <p>Amenities: Furnished apartments on Raccoon Lake: full kitchens, gas grills, boat docks.<o:p></o:p></p> <!--EndFragment--> <p>&nbsp;</p>
http://www.bubblegumbandb.com/ Built in 1909, this historical bed and breakfast is located just three blocks from the county seat. With oak pocket doors, an ornate fireplace, queen beds, and a garden tub, you can relax with bubble gum and chocolates, and fill your mind with hope, faith, love, covered bridges, mills, and trains. In the morning, hostess Elaine Moore will have a country breakfast waiting for you! Amenities: In the morning, hostess Elaine Moore will have a country breakfast waiting for you! Enjoy complimentary bubble gum and chocolates as well!    
Cabins right on Raccoon Lake. Each cabin is fully furnished and ready for you to sit back, relax, and enjoy the lake. Inside, you can sleep 4-6 people comfortably with a full bath, sleeping loft, and fully furnished kitchen. Outside of the cabin, you will find a porch facing the lake, picnic table, gas grill and fire ring with free firewood. Come stay at one of our cabins, and enjoy the best of Raccoon Lake. Seasonal- April through October 4 Cabins Available
<p>3 Suites&nbsp;at the Knoll&nbsp;Inn all&nbsp;distinctively decorated.&nbsp; Open year round with 3 covered bridges within 4 mile.</p> <p><strong>Strauss Suite</strong>-Queen Bed with Whirlpool and small couch folds out to hold 2 small persons.&nbsp; Beautifully decorated with Cable TV, Covered Parking, coin laundry.&nbsp; Dining area provided with microwave and refrigerator.&nbsp; Inside stairs to suite.</p> <p><strong>Harrison Suite</strong>-Queen Bed with Whirlpool.&nbsp; Beautifully decorated with Cable TV, Covered Parking, coin laundry.&nbsp; Dining area provided with microwave and refrigerator.&nbsp; Inside stairs to suite.</p> <p><strong>Meacham&nbsp;Suite-</strong>2 queen beds in seperate quarters.&nbsp; Beautifully decorated with Cable TV,&nbsp;Outside entrance to suite.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p>
Enjoy country elegance and comfortable lodgings at Grannys Farm Bed and Breakfast, located 2 miles east of Turkey Run State Park in the heart of scenic Parke County, Indiana, the "Covered Bridge Capital of the World".Granny's Farm has been a landmark site in northern Parke County for more than a century. With the opening of Granny's Farmhouse in 2008,a variety of convenient lodging arrangements is now available.Both houses on Granny's Farm offer panoramic views of the 160-acre farmstead, including a pond and woods. Each day on Grannys Farm starts with an assortment of cereals, fresh fruit, and coffee - a nice way to welcome the new day. Whether you are enjoying a weekend away from the city or organizing a family reunion, you will find that Granny's Farm offers a variety of accommodations to suit your needs. Amenities: Whirlpool. Continental Breakfast. No pets allowed.      
A modern guest inn within a historic setting. Creekside park leads to Mansfield Covered Bridge and Historic Roller Mill. Close to other Parke County sites including Rockville, Bridgeton, Turkey Run State Park and Billie Creek Village. Only 20 miles from Interstate 70 & 74. Call or email for reservations. Amenities include: Five guest rooms, central air, creekside park and continental breakfast.
Located in beautiful Parke County, Indiana, Covered Bridge Capitol of the World, adjacent to Turkey Run State Parke. Private guest cabins in a rustic setting with all the modern conveniences. Amenities: Air conditioning, heat, satellite tv, dvd players, refrigerators/freezers, microwaves, coffee makers, BBQ grill, picnic tables.      
<p>Centrally located in Parke County near Mansfield Village and Bridgeton. This 60 acre campground also has camping cottages. <strong>New ownership 2013, many updates, added sites, new showerhouse.</strong><o:p></o:p></p> <p>Amenities: Hiking Trails, Shower House, Fishing Lake &amp; Stream and Horseshoes. Music and food are featured on Saturday evenings.<o:p></o:p></p> <!--EndFragment--> <p>&nbsp;</p>
For complete information visit: http://www.rockvillelake.com/independence-day/
<p>Unique camping cabins across from Turkey Run State Park. You bring other camping gear. ($25-$40) Also, tent camping ($12) and overnight canoe trips. Register at &quot;Up the Creek&quot; Campstore (great food, pizza, gifts and supplies).<o:p></o:p></p> <p>Amenities: Electricity, Beds, Outside Fire Table Shower House near by.<o:p></o:p></p> <!--EndFragment--> <p>&nbsp;</p>
<p>Turkey Run Inn provides the comfort of a modern facility with the ambiance of a rustic country inn. Turkey Run Inn combines great food, comfortable lodging & gracious hospitality to create a relaxing environment. While visiting Turkey Run Inn, enjoy many activities in or around Turkey Run State Park such as horseback riding, canoeing, kayaking, mini-golf, go-karts, interpretive Nature Center & 14 miles of hiking trails.<o:p></o:p></p> <p>Amenities: Turkey Run Inn offers an indoor heated pool, complimentary high-speed wireless Internet, arcade, spacious lobby & full-service restaurant, Narrows Restaurant.<o:p></o:p></p> <!--EndFragment--> <p> </p>
Contact the Lyford Fire Dept for more inforamtion: 765-205-5587, or visit https://www.facebook.com/Lyford-Vol-Fire-Dept-530287857036167/timeline/
THE GUESTHOUSES at WILKINS MILL Come stay in one of our three unique, historic Guesthouses next to the Wilkins Mill Covered Bridge # 35 in Scenic Parke County, IN, home of the Covered Bridge Festival.Hilltop Guesthouse at 9115 N. US Hwy 41, Bloomingdale, IN 47832 is located right on US 41 . This unique property sits just West of the Covered Bridge and five minutes from Turkey Run State Park. It has two private bedrooms, one with a Queen bed, the other with a Double bed/Twin bunk combination. There is also a Queen sofa bed in the living room , so up to 7 can sleep comfortably here. Hilltop Guesthouse offers comfortable modern living year round with a full Bath, and fully equipped large country kitchen, breakfast area, and dining room looking out onto beautiful woods bordering Sugar Mill Creek. There is a fenced yard, BBQ grill and a fire pit. Satellite TV/DVD.The Main Cabin- located at 8904 Cox Ford Rd, Bloomingdale, IN. 47832This unique, historic Cabin was originally built in 1828 as the General Store at Wilkins Mill.It sits just East of the Wilkins Mill Covered Bridge. It is filled with History, books, board games, local art and antiques. Staying here is truly an opportunity to step back in time, but enjoy all the modern conveniences of year round Heat/AC, two modern bathrooms, one with a whirlpool tub. There is a full equipped Kitchen, picnic table, patio and BBQ grill. Satellite TV/DVD.The Main Cabin is large- over 1,200 sq feet. It is a wonderful place to relax with family or friends. It features a large wood burning fireplace and open loft type sleeping for groups of 2-10. There is a Queen bed at one end of the 36’ long cabin, two twin beds form an L at the opposite end, and a Queen sofa/sleeper faces the fireplace. The enclosed back porch offers additional beds and a dining table with a view of the covered bridge and woodland trails.The Spring House- at 8904 Coxford Rd. Bloomingdale, IN 47832This small, cozy cabin sleeps two in Twin beds. Built in 1899, The Spring house is the small red building located just across the patio from The Main Cabin. It is paneled with wood from other pioneer homes in the area. It offers, a modern private Bathroom with Jacuzzi Shower, year round Heat/AC, Microwave, coffee maker, mini Fridge, phone and SatelliteTV/DVD. Outside there is a picnic table and fire pit for making S’Mores and enjoying fantastic stargazing. All accommodations are fully furnished with all bedding and linens provided. No Smoking allowed indoors. Kitchens are fully outfitted with all cookware and utensils. Both china and paper goods are provided for your stay. Sugar Mill Creek runs through the 43 acres of private property. Guests can cross the historic Wilkins Mill Covered Bridge, wade or fish at our private beach or hike our private trails. Hiking and Horse Trails are maintained for guest use. Horses are welcome. We have a three stall barn with turnout. Small pets allowed with prior consent of owner.Rates are based on the number of guests. Two Night Minimum stay. Weekly rates available. To book your stay contact owner Jean Turnmire at 765-597-2046
Cabins in a beautiful wooded setting just minutes from Turkey Run State Park. Amenities: Electricity, fire rings, picnic tables. Previously known as Cherokee Village.  
Contact the Lyford Fire Dept for more inforamtion: 765-205-5587, or visit https://www.facebook.com/Lyford-Vol-Fire-Dept-530287857036167/timeline/
Montezuma Park Board with The Montezuma PTO, Riverton Parke Drama Club, and Riverton Parke Band will sponsor The Seventh Annual "Ray Bockhold Memorial Pranks in the Park"<br /> <br /> a FREE<br /> "Trunk or Treat"<br /> Saturday, October 24, 2015<br /> 7:00-8:00 PM<br /> at Reeder Park in Montezuma<br /> <br /> followed by<br /> <br /> "Ray Bockhold Memorial<br /> Pranks in the Park"<br /> Saturday, October 24, 2015<br /> 8:00 PM-10:00 PM<br /> in Reeder Park<br /> located on Washington Street<br /> Montezuma, Indiana<br /> <br /> $5.00 per person includes<br /> A Haunted Hayride or<br /> Unhaunted Hayride<br /> (your choice)<br /> and a Meal with a Drink<br /> <br /> Music by Charlie Jones<br /> <br /> NEW this Year is<br /> The Hoosier Witch<br /> telling<br /> "Haunted Hoosier History"<br /> from 8-10 PM<br /> <br /> All proceeds go towards Parks Improvements<br />
<p>County campground</p>
Cabins in a beautiful wooded setting just minutes from Turkey Run State Park.  Camping sites available. Amenities: Electricity, fire rings, picnic tables Previously known as Cherokee Village.  
RV & camper hookups, primitive sites & FREE Wireless Internet.  Enjoy shopping, picnicing, day visits & GREAT fishing!  Free Fishing For Campers.   Four cabins avaliable: two cabins that sleep 4, one cabin that sleeps 6, and one cabin that sleeps 9.  Canoes, paddle boats and floating docks are available to rent as well.    
State Campground For reservations call 1-866-622-6746
<p>Private/Seasonal Campground &amp; Camping Cabins<o:p></o:p></p> <p>Tent sites &amp; camping cabins.<o:p></o:p></p> <p>Amenities: None listed.<!--EndFragment--></p> <p>&nbsp;</p>
<p>State Campground</p>
The West Central Indiana Model T'ers Chapter of the Model T Ford Club of America welcomes you to tour the beautiful covered bridges and local Amish community in Parke County Indiana. The tour is based out of the Parke County Fairgrounds North of Rockville on US 41 where they have camping and a clean bathhouse is available. Motels and Bed and Breakfasts are located within T driving distance to the fairgrounds. Itinerary: Registration is Friday after 3pm and Saturday morning at the fairgrounds. Friday night, Bingo at 7pm for early arrivals. Saturday's tour starts at 10am with catered meal at 6pm that evening. Daily tours on Sunday, Monday and Tuesday with a short tour Wednesday, all starting at 9am. Cost: Tour will cost $70 for the car, driver, and 1 passenger. Additional riders will be $10 each. Fee covers expenses associated with putting the tour on and the catered meal on Saturday evening. All other expenses (remaining meals, swap meet table space, lodging or camping fees ect) are at the drivers' expense. -The following weekend is the Newport Antique Auto Hill Climb in Newport, Indiana. Registration is limited to the first 100 cars. Cancellations will be honored until 9/1/17. Visit: www.westcentralindianamodelters.com to print registration forms. Please register no later than August 15th, 2017. For more information contact: Brian and Valerie Jordan at 765-762-6067.
<p>Located in the heart of historic Bridgeton, Indiana, Willow Rose RV Park is conveniently near area attractions.<o:p></o:p></p> <p>Amenities: 75 spacious sites with full power &amp; water hookups (30 &amp; 50 amps), septic dump station, shower facilities nearby, LP gas and ice. Special rates &amp; Clubhouse facilities for RV groups and rallies. Guesthouse facilities available. <o:p></o:p></p> <!--EndFragment--> <p>&nbsp;</p>
Shop Small and Locally this Christmas and join us at the Parke County 4-H Fairgrounds November 24th and 25th. A variety of unique items for that special person on your list. -Unique wood items -Primitives -culinary delights -christmas decor -one of a kind handmades -homemade soaps and scents -and much more! Come visit us just north of Rockville on Hwy 41 at the 4-H Fairgrounds. HOURS: Saturday 24th: 9am-2pm Sunday 25th: 9am-2pm See ya there!
<p>Live, Laugh, Love Campin'<br /> &nbsp;</p> <p>Come visit with us and enjoy our shaded campground. Our campsites range from shaded to an open area for tenting and Recreational Vehicles. <br /> Whether you just want to sit by a campfire, hike the trails or go fishing (catch &amp; release), we have a beautiful peaceful environment for your pleasure.<o:p></o:p></p> <p>Our campsites are spacious and clean within a picturesque atmosphere. Our campground is home to countless plants and wildlife making it a perfect location for nature study. Enjoy lake or creek fishing or take a walk to view the wonders of nature on one of our trails. <o:p></o:p></p> <p>We are close to a few of Parke Counties covered bridges and just 3 miles south of Mansfield, Indiana.</p> <p><o:p></o:p></p> <!--EndFragment--> <p><strong>New ownership in 2013. Many updates, added sites, and new showerhouse.&nbsp;</strong></p>
<p>County campground. <strong>Festival and groups only.</strong><o:p></o:p></p> <!--EndFragment-->
SIMPLY SPRING MARKET | May 5th 9am-2pm Located at the Parke County 4-H Fairgrounds (just north of Rockville on Hwy 41) The Simply Spring Market is a perfect time to shop for you and your loved ones. Home and garden decor, seeds, plants, arts and crafts, vintage items and so much more! Graduations, weddings, and birthdays are just a few reasons to stop and shop for the perfect gift.
Parke Vermillion Community Pregnancy Center will have their annual "Walk for Life & 5K Run" and it will take place April 22, 2017, beginning at 9 am until 1 pm. Location is the Rockville Town Square Courthouse Grounds. Registration that day begins at 9 am. 5K Run will take off at 10 am, and the Walk at 10:30 am. This is our main fundraiser for the Center. All our services are free. We are a 501C3 organization. Pre-registration can be done online at www.parkevermillioncommunitypregnancycenter.com, or you can come into the center to register at 410 N. Erie, Rockville, Indiana.
Join us at the Covered Bridge Art Gallery on the north side of the Rockville Square, from 5-8pm, for an evening of spectacular local art. Sponsored by the Covered Bridge Art Association, this Spring Show highlights local art work as well as giving you the opportunity to meet the artist. Refreshments provided, also enter to win some great door prizes! Contact the Gallery for details and more information: 765-569-9422
BBQ Benefit and Christian Concert in the Park May 20th 2017, 12 to 4 pm, Beechwood Park, Rockville. BBQ pork sandwich or hot dog, 2 sides, and a drink. Music by the Faithbridge worship band Sponsored by Faithbridge Assembly of God
Seasonal
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<p>1195 N Lincoln Road</p> <p>US 41 North</p> <p>Rockville, in 47872</p> <p>Sunday -Thursday&nbsp; 4:00 pm -9:00 pm</p> <p>Friday-Saturday&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 4:00 pm-10:00 pm</p>
<p>Hobson&rsquo;s Farm is an agri-tainment entrepreneurship aimed at creating family fall traditions.&nbsp; Simply put, Hobson's Farm has a party in the corn every fall that keeps visitors returning year after year!&nbsp; The seasonal melding of entertainment and agriculture entices families to venture out of their usual surroundings and into the cornfield.&nbsp; Whether church, work, school, or biological, families of all kinds make a trip to Hobson&rsquo;s Farm an annual fall tradition.&nbsp; A yearly visit to Hobson&rsquo;s Farm appeals to the entire family because it bridges across the generations; children attack the corn maze and other attractions like a virtual video game while their elders reconnect to treasured memories of growing up on a farm.<o:p></o:p></p> <p>The main attraction Hobson&rsquo;s Farm has to offer is the seven acre corn maze, &ldquo;a gold and green amusement park ride that stands still&rdquo; as People Magazine puts it.&nbsp; The corn maze is more than just a life-sized labyrinth for people to explore; it is a cornfield transformed into a giant work of art.&nbsp; Hobson&rsquo;s Farm has turned a cornfield &ldquo;canvas&rdquo; the size of seven football fields into images of a covered bridge, a horse and buggy, an Apache helicopter, and more.&nbsp; Although combined to create the intricate design, the paths make up two distinct phases offering varying degrees of difficulty to challenge a multitude of guests.&nbsp; In addition to the maze, Hobson&rsquo;s Farm offers many more exciting attractions such as hayrides, farm animals, a corn box, a pumpkin patch, a corn cannon, campfire sites, a corn train, a roller slide, a tube swing, and more.&nbsp; Hobson&rsquo;s Farm provides an ideal location for educational school field trips, team-building corporate outings, engaging church fellowship, and of course, wholesome family fun!<o:p></o:p><br /> <!--[if !supportEmptyParas]--><!--[endif]--><o:p></o:p></p> <p><strong>2010 Season Information</strong><o:p></o:p></p> <p><!--[if !supportEmptyParas]--> Dates: Saturday, September 18, 2010 through Sunday, October 31, 2010<o:p></o:p></p> <p>Regular Hours:<o:p></o:p><br /> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Fridays 6pm &ndash; 10pm<o:p></o:p><br /> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Saturdays 12pm &ndash; 10pm<o:p></o:p><br /> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Sundays 1pm &ndash;&nbsp; 6pm<o:p></o:p><o:p></o:p></p> <p>Extended Hours during Covered Bridge Festival:<o:p></o:p><br /> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Friday, October 8th 12pm &ndash; 10pm<o:p></o:p><br /> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Saturday, October 9th 12pm &ndash; 10pm<o:p></o:p><br /> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Sunday, October 10th 1pm &ndash; 6pm<o:p></o:p><br /> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Monday, October 11th through Wednesday, October 13th 12pm &ndash; 6pm <o:p></o:p><br /> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Thursday, October 14th and Friday, October 15th 12pm &ndash; 10pm<o:p></o:p><br /> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Saturday, October 16th 12pm &ndash; 10pm<o:p></o:p><br /> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Sunday, October 17th 1pm &ndash; 6pm<o:p></o:p></p> <p>Field Trip and Large Group Reservations are Available by Appointment Outside of Regular Business Hours.<o:p></o:p><o:p></o:p></p> <p>Owners: Corey and Patricia Hobson<o:p></o:p></p> <!--EndFragment--> <p>&nbsp;</p>
<p>Sand Lady's Gourd Farm welcomes you to browse around the gourd farm. You tell me what you do with gourds and I can find the gourds to suit your creativity and ideas to turn gourds into your wildest imagination and dreams. It only takes an idea and go to it with gourds I have grown that are great shapes.<o:p></o:p> <!--EndFragment--></p>
<p><span style="font-family: Cambria; font-size: 10pt">Jim &amp; Gayle Meece<o:p></o:p></span><span style="font-family: Cambria; font-size: 10pt"><!--[endif]--><o:p></o:p></span> <!--EndFragment--><o:p></o:p><strong><!--EndFragment--></strong></p>
<p> <meta content="" name="Title"> <meta content="" name="Keywords"> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8"> <meta content="Word.Document" name="ProgId"> <meta content="Microsoft Word 11" name="Generator"> <meta content="Microsoft Word 11" name="Originator"> <link href="file://localhost/Users/Mollybot/Library/Caches/TemporaryItems/msoclip1/01/clip_filelist.xml" rel="File-List" /><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml> <o:DocumentProperties> <o:Template>Normal</o:Template> <o:Revision>0</o:Revision> <o:TotalTime>0</o:TotalTime> <o:Pages>1</o:Pages> <o:Words>10</o:Words> <o:Characters>62</o:Characters> <o:Company>Lunar Cow</o:Company> <o:Lines>1</o:Lines> <o:Paragraphs>1</o:Paragraphs> <o:CharactersWithSpaces>76</o:CharactersWithSpaces> <o:Version>11.1287</o:Version> </o:DocumentProperties> <o:OfficeDocumentSettings> <o:AllowPNG /> </o:OfficeDocumentSettings> </xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml> <w:WordDocument> <w:Zoom>0</w:Zoom> <w:DoNotShowRevisions /> <w:DoNotPrintRevisions /> <w:DisplayHorizontalDrawingGridEvery>0</w:DisplayHorizontalDrawingGridEvery> <w:DisplayVerticalDrawingGridEvery>0</w:DisplayVerticalDrawingGridEvery> <w:UseMarginsForDrawingGridOrigin /> </w:WordDocument> </xml><![endif]--><style type="text/css"> <!-- /* Font Definitions */ @font-face {font-family:"Times New Roman"; panose-1:0 2 2 6 3 5 4 5 2 3; mso-font-charset:0; mso-generic-font-family:auto; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:50331648 0 0 0 1 0;} @font-face {font-family:Calibri; panose-1:0 2 15 5 2 2 2 4 3 2; mso-font-charset:0; mso-generic-font-family:auto; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:50331648 0 0 0 1 0;} @font-face {font-family:Cambria; panose-1:0 2 4 5 3 5 4 6 3 2; mso-font-charset:0; mso-generic-font-family:auto; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:50331648 0 0 0 1 0;} /* Style Definitions */ p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal {mso-style-parent:""; margin-top:0in; margin-right:0in; margin-bottom:10.0pt; margin-left:0in; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:Calibri;} table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-parent:""; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman";} p.NoSpacing, li.NoSpacing, div.NoSpacing {mso-style-name:"No Spacing"; mso-style-parent:""; margin:0in; margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:Calibri;} @page Section1 {size:8.5in 11.0in; margin:1.0in 1.25in 1.0in 1.25in; mso-header-margin:.5in; mso-footer-margin:.5in; mso-paper-source:0;} div.Section1 {page:Section1;} --></style><!--StartFragment-->Florence Williams<o:p></o:p><!--EndFragment--></meta> </meta> </meta> </meta> </meta> </meta> </p>
<p>Rebecca Pefley<o:p></o:p><!--EndFragment--></p>
<p><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Cambria;"><o:p></o:p></span> <!--EndFragment--></p>
<p><strong>SEASONAL: MID MAY THROUGH MID SEPTEMBER</strong><o:p></o:p></p> <p>Located at the Tourist Information Center.</p> <p>Open 8:00am to Noon. <!--EndFragment--></p>
<p>The Lusk Home and Mill Site was the first European-American development in present Turkey Run State Park, Indiana&rsquo;s second oldest state park. <br /> <br /> Vermonter Salmon Lusk was awarded this land for serving in the Battle of Tippecanoe under William Henry Harrison. The Lusk's were largely self-sufficient. Captain Lusk built a log cabin in 1822 and lived there with his spouse and eight children until 1841. Then he and his sons made bricks, carved walnut woodwork, and built the brick house. He dug a coal mine to heat his house. Lusk built a gristmill in 1826 with a foundation of stone-cut stone. A horizontal waterwheel was powered by water diverted by a dam down a race. A settlement grew around Lusk's house and mill, until a Sugar Creek flood on New Year's Day, 1847, washed away every building except Lusk's brick house. Salmon Lusk's wife lived there until 1880, when John Lusk inherited the property. He was inactive managing the site except for preventing woodcutting.<br /> <br /> After John Lusk died in 1915, the property was put up for sale. A logging company, Hoosier Veneer, paid US$30,000.00 for the site. Richard Lieber and the State Parks Commission raised $40,000.00 to buy the land from the lumber company after last minute support from the Indianapolis Motor Speedway on November 11, 1916. The Lusk parcel was the first land obtained for Turkey Run State Park.<br /> <br /> The Lusk Home is open for tours during the summer. There is a fee for parking vehicles within the state park, but visitors may avoid the fee by parking on a nearby public road, and walking to the Lusk Home. The coal mine is a bat habitat today. This is farther inside the park, so visitors must negotiate Turkey Run's rugged hiking trails to gain access to avoid fees. <!--EndFragment--></p>
<p>The Mansfield Roller Mill or Mansfield Mill was a (gristmill) that was built in 1820 by James Kelsey and Francis Dickson and has always run on water power from Big Raccoon Creek. The original mill was a 30-foot (9.1 m) by 30-foot (9.1 m) log building.<br /> <br /> According to legend, glacial stones from a nearby farm were used for grinding. In the mid 1800s a sash saw mill and a carding mill were added to the grist mill. The mill is a state historic site still in operation. The Mansfield Roller Mill in Parke county in the City of Mansfield, Indiana now runs by water turbine engines.<br /> <br /> Between 1973 and 1978 Tex Kelly (Edward Earl Terry (actor) &quot;The Bad Man of the movies&quot; purchased the Mansfield roller mill and several other buildings and attempt to fulfill his dream of turning the town into Frontier City. His efforts failed and in 1979, Tex and Isabel returned to Tex's hometown of Coxville, Indiana and opened &quot;Tex's Longhorn Tavern&quot;. <br /> <br /> Owners Jack &amp; Shirley Dalton and Frank &amp; Sharon Hutcheson donated the mill to the Indiana Department of Natural Resources, Division of State Museums and Historic Sites in 1995.<br /> <br /> The Mansfield Roller Mill is located at the corner of Mansfield Rd. (historic) and Big Raccoon Creek in Mansfield IN 47872, just southeast of Rockville, Indiana.</p> <!--EndFragment-->
<p>The Arch in the Town of Marshall, also known as Marshall Arch, was built in 1921 by Carroll Beeson.<o:p></o:p> <!--EndFragment--></p>
<p>Open during Covered Bridge Festival for viewing.<o:p></o:p> <!--EndFragment--></p>
<p>Mordecai Peter Centennial Brown (October 19, 1876 &ndash; February 14, 1948), nicknamed &quot;Three Finger&quot; or &quot;Miner&quot;, was an American Major League Baseball pitcher at the turn of the 20th century. Due to a farm-machinery accident in his youth, Brown lost parts of two fingers on his right hand and eventually acquired his nickname as a result. Overcoming this handicap and turning it to his advantage, he became one of the elite pitchers of his era. <br /> <br /> Brown was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1949.<br /> <br /> Brown was born in Nyesville, Indiana. He was also known as &quot;Miner&quot;, having worked in western Indiana coal mines for a while before beginning his professional baseball career. Nicknames like &quot;Miner&quot; and &quot;Three Finger&quot; (or sometimes &quot;Three-Fingered&quot;) were headline writers' inventions. To fans and friends he was probably best known as &quot;Brownie&quot;. To his relatives and close friends, he was also known as &quot;Mort&quot;.<br /> <br /> His three-part given name came from the names of his uncle, his father, and the United States Centennial year of his birth, respectively.<br /> <br /> According to his biography, he suffered two separate injuries to his right hand. The first and most famous trauma came when he was feeding material into the farm's feed chopper. He slipped and his hand was mangled by the knives, severing much of his index finger and damaging the others. A doctor repaired the rest of his hand as best he could. While it was still healing, the injury was further aggravated by a fall he took, which broke several finger bones. They were not re-set properly, especially the middle finger (see photo), and he kept quiet about this clumsy accident until he was well into adulthood.<br /> <br /> He learned to pitch, as many children did, by aiming rocks at knotholes on the barn wall and other wooden surfaces. Over time, with constant practice, he developed great control. As a &quot;bonus&quot;, the manner in which he had to grip the ball (see photo) resulted in an unusual amount of spin. This allowed him to throw an effective curve ball, and a deceptive fast ball and change-up. The extra topspin made it difficult for batters to connect solidly. In short, he &quot;threw ground balls&quot;, and was exceptionally effective.<br /> <br /> After a spectacular minor league career commencing in Terre Haute of the Three-I League in 1901, Brown came to the majors rather late, at age 26, in 1903, and lasted until 1916 when he was close to 40.<br /> <br /> Brown's most productive period was when he played for the Chicago Cubs from 1904 until 1912. During this stretch, he won 20 or more games six times and was part of two World Series championships. New York Giants manager John McGraw regarded his own Christy Mathewson and Brown as the two best pitchers in the National League. In fact, Brown often defeated Mathewson in competition, most significantly in the final regular season game of the 1908 season. Brown had a slim career 13-11 edge on Mathewson, with one no-decision in their 25 classic pitching matchups. <br /> <br /> Brown's most important single game effort was the pennant-deciding contest between the Cubs and the New York Giants on October 8, 1908, at New York. With the great Mathewson starting for the Giants, Cubs starter Jack Pfiester got off to a weak start and was quickly relieved by Brown, who held the Giants in check the rest of the way as the Cubs prevailed 4-2, to win the pennant. The Cubs then went on to win their second consecutive World Series championship, their last to date.<br /> <br /> Brown also played in the Federal League with the St. Louis Terriers (where he also briefly managed the Brooklyn Tip-Tops and the Chicago Whales).<br /> <br /> Brown was a switch-hitter, which was and is unusual for a pitcher. He took some pride in his hitting, and had a fair batting average for a pitcher, consistently near .200 in the major leagues.<br /> <br /> Brown and Mathewson wrapped their respective careers by squaring off on September 4, 1916. The game was billed as the final meeting between the two old baseball warriors. The high-scoring game was a win for Mathewson's Reds over Brown's Cubs.<br /> <br /> Brown finished his major league career with a 239-130 record, 1375 strikeouts, and a 2.06 ERA, the third best in Major League Baseball history, after Ed Walsh and Addie Joss.<br /> <br /> Following his retirement from the majors, he returned to his home in Terre Haute, where he continued to pitch in the minor leagues and in exhibition games for more than a decade, as well as coaching and managing. According to his biography, in an exhibition game against the famous House of David touring team in 1928, at the age of 51, he pitched three innings as a favor to the local team, and struck out all nine batters he faced.<br /> <br /> From 1920 to 1945, Brown ran a filling station in Terre Haute, that also served as a town gathering place and an unofficial museum. He was also a frequent guest at Old-Timers' games in Chicago.<br /> <br /> In his later years, Brown was plagued by diabetes and then by the effects of a stroke. He died in 1948, and news of his passing reminded sportswriters of his past achievements.<br /> <br /> In 1999, 83 years after his last game and 51 years after his death, he was named as a finalist to the Major League Baseball All-Century Team.<br /> <br /> Between Brown and Antonio Alfonseca, the Cubs have featured both a &quot;three-fingered&quot; pitcher and a six-fingered pitcher on their all-time roster (Brown technically had four, including the thumb). <!--EndFragment--></p>
<p>Juliet V. Strauss was born in 1863 in Rockville, Indiana, in a rural agricultural area of the state. Her parents were William and Susan (King) Humphreys, both new to the region and there to make new lives as pioneer farmers. She grew up and married the editor of the local paper, the Rockville Tribune, for which she started writing a daily column called &quot;Squibs and Sayings.&quot; She mostly poked fun at her husband and wrote editorials about the need for common sense in life. Her writing became very popular, and she soon started writing for magazines. <o:p></o:p></p> <p>Under the pseudonym &quot;The Country Contributor,&quot; Strauss wrote a column she called &quot;The Ideas of a Plain Country Woman,&quot; in the Ladies Home Journal. Over the course of eleven years she wrote fourteen articles, later collecting some of her favorite articles in a book, The Ideas of a Plain Country Woman. <o:p></o:p></p> <p>One topic that she elaborated upon in her column was the aura of depression that settled upon her when she went into the city: <o:p></o:p></p> <p>Occasionally I go to the capital city.... I try to fortify myself for the trip, arming myself against the depression that invariably settles upon me at the sight of the high buildings, the dingy approaches to the big railway station where one sees men black with car grease and smoke, women in squalid houses, and listless children in the shadows of the brewery, or in the bits of ragged yard. . . . (21 Mar. 1907: 38 ) <o:p></o:p></p> <p>Urbanization creates stifling and dirty living conditions to its residents, according to the Country Contributor, but in contrast, people who live in the country enjoy its many luxuries. The fresh air and unpolluted environment with space for living are very different from the imagery of the city: <o:p></o:p></p> <p>[F]or country people really are the only people who live in this world, if by this world is meant trees, and hills, and fields, and clear running water courses, and blue skies.... In the country poor folk revel in the luxuries which are only names to the vast majority of city people. To them come calm days away from noise and turmoil, sweet food fresh from Nature&rsquo;s Storehouse, a worldful of clean air untainted by smoke and human breath.... (21 Jan. 1906: 34) <o:p></o:p></p> <p>She writes about the country in another article, which discusses the relationship between the farmer and the land: <o:p></o:p></p> <p>I used to get dreadfully discouraged in the spring of the year because I wasn&rsquo;t a man. I longed to get out in the field and guide the plow, feel the earth responding to my touch as the furrow began to curl up over the plowshare, and the team fell into the swing of it, and every force of Nature seemed to respond to the mood of spring and the stirring of new life and hope. (21 May 1907: 28) <o:p></o:p></p> <p>In this entry, Strauss focuses on the closeness between the pioneer farm workers and the land. They lived off the land, and it provided them with everything that they needed. They worked with the land on a sensual level, with their hands helping the land to produce. This is something that has almost been forgotten in today's agriculture, as most, if not all, of the work is done by heavy machinery. <o:p></o:p></p> <p>It was through the use of her popularity as a writer and speaker that Strauss was able to save Turkey Run State Park from lumber harvesters. Turkey Run is a 2,382-acre nature preserve located in west central Indiana. It was purchased by the state and made into Indiana's second state park in 1916. Strauss used the influence that she gained in the Rockville Tribune to inform people of that area about the danger threatening the natural beauty of the park. She wrote to the state representatives to plead for help. Because of her efforts, the money to save the park was raised. As a tribute to her unfailing work, in 1921, three years after her death, the Woman's Press Club of Indiana dedicated a memorial statue to her in Turkey Run State Park, commemorating her great respect for the natural world. <o:p></o:p></p> <p>Strauss wrote about the environment of Indiana as something beautiful and a luxury to those who are lucky enough to be able to live there. Her writings express a great respect for nature, and an admiration for what it provides for the human race. Her respect for nature shows in her commitment to protecting nature. <o:p></o:p></p> <!--EndFragment--> <p>&nbsp;</p>
<p>Cost: $79,000.00<br /> Constructed: 1879 - 1882</p> <p>&quot;Original plans (for the courthouse) called for 'red pressed brick with white limestone trim.' Before the foundation was finished, the contractor agreed to substitute stone for the red brick at no increase in cost. What the edifice would look like in red brick defies imagination, but whoever persuaded the commissioners the change deserves an unqualified blessing.&quot;<o:p></o:p></p> <p>&quot;In 1880, with the courthouse about half built, the contractor (from Ft. Wayne) failed. Two new commissioners &quot;had been strongly and volubly opposed to the courthouse project and there was a flurry speculation ... they would refuse to continue with it. They did the logical and rational thing. On March 26, 1880, they appointed Isaac McFaddin superintendent of construction.&quot;<o:p></o:p></p> <p>&quot;There were several master carpenters in the county and to all those men go the credit for the walnut woodwork that makes this county building as beautiful on the inside as the outside. The massive doors at all 4 entrances are works of art and all interior woodwork is comparable. Had the contractor not failed, the courthouse would not have had such painstaking workmanship.&quot;<o:p></o:p></p> <p>(Old newspaper clippings reported that &quot;local workmen, notably the Patton brothers,&quot; were hired to do the carpentry work. &quot;Their fine workmanship remains the admiration of all who note the beautiful black walnut door and window frames that grace the building.&quot;)<o:p></o:p></p> <p>&quot;The last cry from the opposition (to the construction of the courthouse) was an accusation of graft. This is usual in connection with any public construction and is all to often justified. In this case the public was invited to scrutinize all contracts and accounts.&quot;<o:p></o:p></p> <p>&quot;Efforts have been made twice to surface the south lawn for a parking lot. The first time a petition of remonstrance reached the commissioners before the advocates made application. The next time, the project was not publicized and the advocates thought it was assured, but they reckoned too soon. When the women of Rockville learned of the plan, they stormed into the courthouse and the commissioners were swamped in the corridors.&quot;<o:p></o:p></p> <p>&quot;Like all lawns, (the courthouse lawn) was surrounded by fence for many years. About 1920, it became unstylish and was removed. It was of black ornamental iron.&quot;<!--EndFragment--></p> <p>&nbsp;</p>
Enjoy all types of framed art work, jewelry, baskets, pottery, and photography by over 30 Parke County artists. Bridges, barns, landscapes and floral are popular subjects. Visit our website to learn more about the Gallery, the artists and to see their work. Open daily 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Sunday 1 - 5 p.m.  Closed On Tuesdays.
<p>The Parke County Historical Society was organized on May 12, 1894.&nbsp; It was chartered by the state of Indiana in July 1917. The purpose of the Parke County Historical Society is to preserve the history of Parke County, Indiana. Today the Parke County Historical Society has 175 members.<o:p></o:p></p> <p>The Parke County Historical Society Museum moved to its present location in 1975. The building was originally built as a seminary. The building has also been used as an armory during the Civil War, a school for black children, a gas station, a restaurant, and a gift shop. In the last 12 months over 300 visitors have toured the museum.<!--[endif]--><o:p></o:p></p> <!--EndFragment--> <p>&nbsp;</p>
<p><em><strong>33 Miles: </strong>You will see McAllister Bridge, Neet Bridge, Bridgeton Bridge &amp; Grist Mill, Colloms General Store, Mansfield Bridge &amp; Roller Mill as well as Amish Family Farms.</em></p> <p>Depart Tourist Information Center by turning RIGHT onto HIGH ST.</p> <p>At stop sign, turn LEFT onto BRIDGETON RD.</p> <p>Follow BRIDGETON RD. into Bridgeton</p> <p>Upon passing Bridgeton Covered Bridge turn LEFT onto HAWKINS RD.</p> <p>Turn LEFT on Mansfield Road.</p> <p>Cross SR 59 into Mansfield.</p> <p>Travel through Mansfield Bridge on 775 E.</p> <p>Turn LEFT onto 720 S.</p> <p>Turn LEFT onto 1000 E.</p> <p>Turn LEFT onto FERNDALE RD.</p> <p>Turn RIGHT onto SR 59.<o:p></o:p></p> <p>Turn LEFT onto NEW DISCOVERY RD.</p> <p>Turn RIGHT onto BRIDGETON RD.</p> <p>Continue back into Rockville.</p> <p>-END-</p>
<p><strong><em>30 Miles: </em></strong><em>You will see McAllister Bridge, Neet Bridge, Bridgeton Bridge, Collom&rsquo;s General Store, Rosedale, and the Thorpe Ford Bridge </em></p> <p>Depart Tourist Information Center by turning RIGHT onto HIGH ST.</p> <p>At stop sign turn LEFT onto BRIDGETON RD.</p> <p>Follow BRIDGETON RD. into Bridgeton</p> <p>Continue past cemetery on BRIDGETON RD.</p> <p>Turn RIGHT onto HIGH BANKS RD.</p> <p>Turn RIGHT onto ROSEDALE RD.</p> <p>Turn around at ROSEDALE CIVIC CENTER.</p> <p>Turn LEFT onto CEMETERY STREET.</p> <p>CEMETERY STREET changes to CATLIN RD.</p> <p>CATLIN RD. changes to MARKET ST. in the town of Rockville.</p> <p>Follow MARKET ST. to HIGH ST.</p> <p>Turn RIGHT onto HIGH ST.</p> <p>Return to Tourist Information Center on Left.</p> <p>-END-</p>
<p><strong><em>33 Miles</em></strong><em>: You will see Rockville Lake, Family Farms, Amish Country, Marshall Arch, Narrows Bridge, and the Billie Creek Bridge </em></p> <p>Depart Tourist Information Center by turning RIGHT&nbsp; onto HIGH ST.<o:p></o:p></p> <p>At stop sign turn RIGHT onto ERIE ST. and cross over U.S. 36<o:p></o:p></p> <p>Turn RIGHT onto STARK ST.</p> <p>STARK ST. changes to MARSHALL RD.</p> <p>Pass under the MARSHALL ARCH.</p> <p>Continue North on MARSHALL RD. out of Marshall.</p> <p>Crossover SR 47 onto NARROWS RD.</p> <p>Go to NARROWS BRIDGE and turn around.</p> <p>Return to MARSHALL ARCH and turn LEFT onto SR 236.</p> <p>Turn RIGHT onto 400 East</p> <p>Travel through Amish Communities and Make a RIGHT onto NYESVILLE ROAD.</p> <p>Arrive at US 36</p> <p>Crossover US 36 onto BILLIE CREEK RD. and turn RIGHT onto OLD US 36 to travel through Billie Creek Bridge.</p> <p>Turn LEFT onto HIGH ST.</p> <p>Return to Tourist Information Center on Right.</p> <p>-END-</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Optional Extended Portion of Route:</strong></p> <p>Go to NARROWS BRIDGE and DO NOT turn around</p> <p>Continue North on Narrow's Road</p> <p>Turn Right on 1200 North.</p> <p>Turn Right on Henley Road which will return back to the NARROWS BRIDGE.</p> <p>-END-</p>
<p><strong><em>28 Miles: </em></strong><em>You will see West Union Bridge &amp; Catlin Bridge and town of Bloomingdale.</em><o:p></o:p></p> <p>Depart Tourist Information Center by turning RIGHT onto HIGH ST.</p> <p>At stop sign turn RIGHT onto MARKET ST.</p> <p>At stop light continue North on MARKET ST. which changes to HOWARD AVE.</p> <p>At stop light continue straight on HOWARD AVE. which changes to STRAWBERRY RD. outside of town limits.</p> <p>Continue on STRAWBERRY ROAD.</p> <p>Turn RIGHT onto 600 WEST.</p> <p>Turn LEFT onto LEATHERWOOD ROAD.</p> <p>Turn LEFT onto JACKSON STREET</p> <p>Turn RIGHT on WILKISON STREET.</p> <p>Turn RIGHT onto NORTH JEFFERSON STREET which changes into RIVER ROAD.</p> <p>Turn LEFT onto TOW PATH ROAD.</p> <p>Take TOW PATH ROAD to West Union Covered Bridge and turn around.</p> <p>Take a LEFT onto 10 O'CLOCK ROAD.</p> <p>Take a LEFT onto County Road 500 NORTH.</p> <p>Take a RIGHT onto B'DALE ROAD. (May be marked as Broadway Street in Bloomingdale)</p> <p>Go through Town of Bloomingdale.</p> <p>Continue on B'DALE RD. to the stop sign at GOLF COURSE RD.</p> <p>Turn RIGHT to continue on B'DALE ROAD</p> <p>Take B'DALE RD. to STRAWBERRY</p> <p>RD. and turn LEFT at County Jail.</p> <p>Continue back into Rockville on HOWARD AVENUE</p> <p>-END-</p>
We have everything for your day of fun in the sun!!  Open April-October Sunday-Friday: 8 am-6 pm Saturday: 8 am-8 pm WE HAVE CHANGED LOCATION! We are now conveniently located inside the Raccoon State Recreation Area next to the beach.
Parke County Hospitality during the Covered Bridge Festival!! Seek lodging when the year round lodging facilities are booked. Contact our office and we will provide to you a contact list of friendly locals that have chosen to graciously open their homes to our fine visitors. For more information contact the information center at: (765) 569-5226, or email us at: info@coveredbridges.com.
<p>Rockville Lake Park is a popular destination&nbsp;to&nbsp;take away stress of everyday life and enjoy an outdoor recreation experience!</p> <p>This 400 acre park operated by the Parke County Park &amp; Recreation Board. The park features Rockville Lake, which is a 103 acre watershed that was&nbsp;built in 1972. The lake is one of the hottest fishing lakes in Indiana and offers the chance to catch bluegill, red-ear, crappie, bass, and catfish. A boat ramp, a&nbsp;100 foot&nbsp;wheelchair accessible fishing pier, boat rentals, and several hundred&nbsp;feet of open shoreline&nbsp;is available for people of all ages and capabilities to cast into this astounding fishery!</p> <p>Rockville Lake Park offers primitive, modern, and full hook-up campsites with plenty of room to enjoy the favorite camp games. These sites are designed to accommodate any type of trailer and RV&nbsp;to ensure&nbsp;quality enjoyment for every visitor. Our primitive site&nbsp;selection gives you the option for moderately wooded sites or sites along the wood line in the&nbsp;grass. All of the campsites&nbsp;allow for plenty of room for the entire family! With a total of 157 campsites, there is plenty of room for&nbsp;you and the family to come&nbsp;out and enjoy the great&nbsp;outdoors.&nbsp;There are several horseshoe pits, two volleyball courts, a basketball court, nature trails,&nbsp;and three modern playgrounds located throughout the park. The park is an excellent place to see some of natures creatures!</p>
<p>This go kart track is over 850 feet long, constructed to give the speed and proved as much excitement as possible.&nbsp; <br /> &nbsp;</p>
G&M Variety has the appeal of an old fashioned five-and-dime, with nearly every inch of space being utilized to showcase its merchandise.
<p>Look for locally made hand-crafted, pottery, jewelry, clothing, and needlework - hand-crafted furniture in primitive, country, and shabby chic styles - antiques and collectibles from in and around Parke County - vintage cookbooks from the private collection of Neva Willhite - extraordinary gift items at affordable prices!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Check us out on <a href="http://www.facebook.com/nevasstore">Facebook</a>!</p>
Previously was known as Cherokee Village.   Great gift shop located in front of campground and cabins. Minnetonka Moccasins Available.
<p><em>Seasonal Business.</em></p>
Seasonal Business.
<p>&nbsp;<font color="#222222" face="Arial, Tahoma, sans-serif"><span style="font-size: 12.8000001907349px;">Available vendor location for covered bridge festival.&nbsp;</span></font><span style="color: rgb(34, 34, 34); font-family: Arial, Tahoma, sans-serif; font-size: 12.8000001907349px;">Town Square - 104 W Ohio Street - indoor, secured (owner on site) call&nbsp;</span><a target="_blank" href="http://tel:352-745-0379/" value="+13527450379" style="color: rgb(34, 34, 34); font-family: Arial, Tahoma, sans-serif; font-size: 12.8000001907349px;">352-745-0379</a><span style="color: rgb(34, 34, 34); font-family: Arial, Tahoma, sans-serif; font-size: 12.8000001907349px;">&nbsp;for details</span></p> <div><span style="font-size: 12.8000001907349px;"><br /> </span></div>
<p><strong>Builder: </strong>Jefferson P. Van Fossen of Frankfort Construction Adams Construction Contractor<br /> <strong>Built:</strong> 1907<br /> <strong>Creek:</strong> Little Raccoon Creek<br /> <strong>Location:</strong> Located one mile north of State Sanatorium and east of Nyesville.<br /> <strong>Reference Code:</strong> (#2), 14-61-23, 12-61-26, nb, Adams/Washington 2/35-15/16N&mdash;7W<br /> <strong>Size:</strong> 154 ft Long +8&rsquo; +8&rsquo;, 16 ft Wide, 12&rsquo; 6<br /> <strong>Truss:</strong> Burr Arch 1 span<br /> <strong>Foundation: </strong>Concrete <br /> <br /> <strong>Repair/Restoration History: </strong>Destroyed by flood 1969. Replaced by Jessup Bridge (#15), February, 1970. Bypassed: 1988<br /> <br /> <strong>Bridge History: </strong>Also known as &quot;Ray&rsquo;s Bridge&quot;<br /> <br /> Jessup Bridge destroyed by flood in 1989. It washed under State Sanatorium Bridge and over US 36 concrete bridge at the Plank Road bridge site.<br /> <br /> The Adams Bridge was built on the Adams farm and was named for the family. Philip Adams was an Ohio veteran of the War of 1812. He purchased 80 acres in Parke County in 1835. His son Harvey Adams continued farming and by 1893, owned 2300 acres in Parke County. In 1959 Roy Adams owned over 1500 acres. In 1990 the same acreage was owned by Adams Farms, Inc.<br /> <br /> Earlier, the crossing had been called Ray&rsquo;s Ford, named from Mr. Ray&rsquo;s grist mill, which was located upstream from the ford.<br /> <br /> Jefferson P. Van Fossen later constructed the Jessup bridge, in 1910. He was also the contractor in 1910 for the second Roseville Bridge, but the credited builder was J. Brooks or J.J. Daniels. His brother J. Lawrence Van Fossen constructed the Conley&rsquo;s Ford Covered Bridge, the same year as J.P. Van Fossen built the Adams Bridge.<br /> <br /> The construction was awarded to Adams Construction and apparently subcontracted to Frankfort Construction, and J.P.<br /> <br /> Van Fossen was the onsite foreman. Frankfort Construction completed the Beeson Bridge, in 1906, the previous year.<br /> <br /> Van Fossen bridges are all built in the J.J. Daniels style and have &quot;J.J. Daniels arched portals.&quot;<br /> <br /> Photo courtesy of Jim Watson.</p>
<p><strong>Built: </strong>1854<br /> <strong>Builder:</strong> Henry Wolf <strong><br /> Creek: </strong>Big Raccoon Creek <strong><br /> Location:</strong> Located on Lafayette Road in Armiesburg. <br /> <strong>Reference Code:</strong> (#42) Wabash 7/12-15N&mdash;8/9W<br /> <strong>Truss: </strong>Long Truss with Arch<br /> <strong>Original Cost: </strong>$6,500 or $7,500&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Repair/Restoration History: </strong>Destroyed by flood in 1913. Replaced by two span concrete bridge. This concrete bridge collapsed in 1930 and was replaced by the present concrete bridge. Arches were reused in Cox Ford Covered Bridge, #36.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Bridge History: </strong>Armiesburg was the site where General William Henry Harrison crossed the Big Raccoon in 1811 on his way to the Battle of Tippecanoe. Later, in 1812. General Samuel Hopkins camped nearby on his campaign. (Therefore it is Armiesburg, not Armyburg.)&nbsp; A mill was built at Armiesburg in the 1820&rsquo;s by Abner Cox. (Or. Solomon Allen built a mill in 1827.) Later, John W. Underwood operated the mill. The first was of logs with a brush dam. Arthur Patterson replaced it with a 3 story frame structure and a log dam, which was later operated by James Patterson. Judge J.Y. Patterson, and J.W. Russel.</p> <p>Aquilla Laverty bought the mill in 1890 and remodeled it with a stone basement, new rollers, steam engine, and stone dam. He tried to move it to his farm as a steam powered mill and elevator, but he fell from the building and died 5 days later on December 1,1896. The mill was never rebuilt. The county commissioners decided in 1852 to build a bridge at Armiesburg. As the rumor of the decision became a news leak, county residents began protesting. The county commissioners ware convinced to call a special meeting at which the bridge was postponed for another year. Various groups wanted bridges built at Manwaring Mill or Sugar Creek, Portland Mills, Mansfield Mills, Bridgeton, and Reelsville over Big Raccoon and at other places on Little Raccoon.</p> <p>The Armiesburg Bridge was authorized by the county commissioners in June, 1854. The county authorized $5,500 the first year and an additional $2.000 a year later. There were $700 in public donations. Through the years there has been much confusion over the identity of Parke County&rsquo;s earliest covered bridge builder. Henry Wolf has been confused with his son. Aaron Wolf. In fact, Aaron J. Wolf was born Armiesburg in 1854 while Henry was building the Armiesburg Bridge. Aaron Wolf later operated a successful sawmill in Waveland. Indiana, and held several Parke County offices.</p> <p>A photo of the bridge shows clearly that it did not have the kingposts of a Burr arch. Stephen Daniels and his son, Joseph J. Daniels were representatives of Colonel Long and his patented truss and were building Long Truss bridges in Ohio during this same time period.</p> <p>Part of the wood for the Armiesburg Bridge was sawn at the nearby Armiesburg Mill. Some was sawed by Julius Egbert and Chariton Britton with a whipsaw. Chariton Britton gave the whipsaw to his son, Joseph A. Britton, another Parke County bridge building giant. The wood included local beech, oak and walnut. Armiesburg was once a thriving community with mills, stores, and population. It was the second county seat, and court was held there in 1827. Armiesburg launched and passed many flatboats of Parke County pork, grain, whiskey, lumber, and other products on their way to the South and New Orleans.&nbsp;</p>
<p><strong>Built:</strong> 1868<br /> <strong>Builder:</strong> Joseph J. Daniels <br /> <strong>Creek:</strong> Big Raccoon Creek<strong> <br /> Location:</strong> Located in Bridgeton, Indiana. <strong><br /> Reference Code:</strong> #8,14-61-04, 12-61-04, bt, Raccoon 15/22-14N&mdash;7W <strong><br /> Size: </strong>245 ft long,+11&rsquo;+11&rsquo;, 13 ft wide, 12&rsquo; clearance<br /> <strong>Truss: </strong>Burr Arch 2 span<br /> <strong>Foundation: </strong>Sandstone block<br /> <strong>Original Cost: </strong>$10,200&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Repair/Restoration History: </strong>Bypassed 1967. Replaced 2 earlier open bridges which fell in. Refurbished 1988-9 by Bridgeton Heritage Foundation. Destroyed by arson April 28, 2005.</p> <p><strong>Bridge History: </strong>The first Bridgeton Mill was built by Kockwood and Silliman in about 1823. It was owned by Oniel and Wasson and later bought by James Searing. James A. Rea worked the mill from about 1850 to 1860. Ralph Sprague bought the mill in 1862 and it burned down in 1869. In 1871 he rebuilt the mill, and it was operated by Joseph Cole. In 1882 Daniel Webster bought the mill, and in 1889 P.T. Winney bought it. In June, 1914, George Brake and Fred Mitchell purchased the mill. Mr. Brake said that the south half of the dam was constructed in 1913, the remainder in 1916. It is concrete, 225 feet long and 9 feet high. In earlier years, the town developed a bad reputation and was often referred to as&quot;Sodom&quot;. The ladies of the town tried to change the town&rsquo;s reputation. They renamed the town Bridgeton for its early bridge. The first bridge was open with wood rails and piers. Owen Wimmer and family were dropped into the mill pond with their wagon and team when it fell in. J.H.Kerr and others rescued them. A second and similar bridge was built on the same site. This bridge fell down, too, just after J.H.Kerr drove cattle across. A covered bridge was built in the same location, just above the mill dam with the abutments attached to the dam structure in 1868. On May 6,1868, before the bridge was completed, three men tried to cross the rain swollen waters in a boat. It overturned and James Shumaker survived while William Clark and Gideon Crooks were drowned. (This location remains a dangerous place for canoers. The rapid current will pull a boat or canoe through the breach in the dam before they can turn the craft or secure a hold on the stone wall).</p> <p>The Bridgeton Station was on the Indiana Coal Railroad. The railroad only hauled freight and coal.</p> <p>The present mill has been converted to run on electric power. Robert Weis and the Weis Milling Company operated the mill until 1995 when it was purchased by Mike Roe. The current owner has restored the mill and produces over 20 different milled products.</p> <p>The 1868 bids included: Mr. Epperson, Howe Plan, $16,000; Wheelock and McCoy, Burr Plan, $17,400 and Smith Plan, $10,200; J.J.Daniels, Burr Plan, $10,200. The construction was awarded to J.J.Daniels. Today, the Daniels portals have been squared off. Decorative benches and steps have been built at the portals. The 13 feet wide bridge is noticeably narrower than other covered bridges. The creek has silted in below the bridge making the bridge seem very low.</p> <p>Sadly, this bridge was lost to arson on April 28, 2005.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p>
<p><strong>Built: </strong>1852-53<br /> <strong>Builder: </strong>Hirem Bishop; Mr. Bishop, Contractor <strong><br /> Creek:</strong> Wabash River, Vermillion County <strong><br /> Location: </strong>Located in Clinton, at Elm Street, now Four Seasons Fountain, and the old Highway 163 roadbed. <strong><br /> Reference Code:</strong> (#58), Florida 14-14N&mdash;9W <strong><br /> Size: </strong>730 ft long<br /> <strong>Truss:</strong> Long Truss 2 lane 3 covered spans and one 70 foot draw span<br /> <strong>Foundation:</strong> Cut stone<br /> <strong>Original Cost:</strong> $25,000-30,000&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Repair/Restoration History: </strong>Second bridge at this location. Destroyed by electric cutting wires in 1899. Replaced by public iron bridge in 1900. (The iron bridge was destroyed and replaced in 1961.) </p> <p><strong>Bridge History: </strong>The Clinton Covered Bridge was proposed and publicized by the Wabash &amp; Erie Canal. They wanted to open business and commerce between Clinton and Clinton Locks (now Lyford) on the Wabash &amp; Erie Canal across the Wabash River.</p> <p>T.L. Williams, Canal Engineer for the Wabash &amp; Erie, estimated that the bridge would cost $25,000 to $30,000. The Wabash &amp; Erie Canal was going to pay $16,700, and the balance was to be paid by farmers and citizens of Clinton.</p> <p>A letter to Joseph J. Daniels on September 10, 1851, indicates that J.J. Daniels and A.B. Condit intended to bid on this bridge under the name of Daniels and Condit Bridge Builders. The contract was awarded to a Mr. Bishop in 1852. In turn, he hired his brother, Hirem Bishop, as foreman, and he is credited as builder. (A Mr. C. W. Bishop is credited with Irishman&rsquo;s Bridge in Vigo County in 1845.) Two lots located north of the bridge site were purchased by the Bishops and remained in the family for years. A &quot;home place&quot; was later constructed by Hirem Bishop, and another house was built on the other lot by his son. These lots are now occupied by Mike&rsquo;s Motors. A. T. Patterson, who worked for J.J. Daniels constructing the Terre Haute Ohio Street Covered Bridge, also worked for Hirem Bishop on the Clinton Covered Bridge. The bridge was framed up on the adjacent lots. During the following June 1853, it was dismantled and reassembled on the piers over the Wabash River. It included two lanes of three wood covered spans and a 70 toot draw span in its 790 foot length.</p> <p>The Clinton Covered Bridge was a toll bridge, partially to recover the cost o[ construction and maintenance, but also to make a profit. Toll keepers lived and worked out of the toll house on the north Clinton comer of the bridge, Francis Cunningham was toll keeper from about 1870 to his death in 1880. A.T. Patterson was toll keeper on the bridge he had helped build, in his retirement years. One source says that a Mr. Weber was the last toll keeper. Another source slates that John H. Birt was the last toll keeper. He also lived in the toll house and maintained a shoe shop there to make and repair shoes. Dr. J.H. Bogart was the last owner of the covered bridge. He sold it to the Vermillion County Commissioners in February 1892 for $4,500 with the following conditions: he could continue possession and toll collecting until the bridge was destroyed and that he would destroy it in a safe and acceptable manner. The bridge was destroyed and replaced by a free bridge due to the campaigning of the newly formed Businessmen&rsquo;s Association of Clinton. Clinton had changed from pork packing houses on the river to a downtown business financed and frequented by the coal miners trade. The businessmen claimed the toll was keeping Parke County residents out of Clinton and from spending money in their; stores.</p> <p>One source claims that a contract was awarded to dismantle the bridge but not performed by the deadline. It is said that the idea for the destruction came to Dr. Bogart as he sat on the porch of his office on Mulberry Street in August 1899. A bolt of lightning convinced him to use electricity. He walked across the street to the home of Henry Mills, a young electrician. The bridge was wired for electrocution by Henry Mills, Roscoe Russel, and Carl F. Balmer. Carl Balmer explained that they drilled holes through the spans and threaded wires through. Then they hung weights on the wires to pull them through the timbers to drop the span into the Wabash River waters below. This method avoided the dangers of a dynamite blast, a bridge tire, or dismantling the bridge piece by piece. It also allowed reuse of the lumber.</p> <p>Balmer ran the town generator, which was later owned by Public Service of Indiana. It was capable of only 1100 volts so they &quot;reversed the currant to increase the amperage&quot; [sic]. The day of demotion was published without details and the whole town turned out to watch by early morning. When nothing happened by lunch time, they began laughing and making fun of the owner. The draw span had already been removed and the east end was wired first. In the afternoon a thin smoke without noticeable flame was seen. Then pieces of the spans began dropping into the water below, and men in boats began gathering the lumber. Each of the remaining spans were dismantled in the same way. The amazing method was talked about all over the county.</p> <p>Navigate to &quot;Our Covered Bridges&quot; and scroll down to Clinton Bridge.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</p>
<p><strong>Built: </strong>1869, rebuilt 1898<br /> <strong>Builder: </strong>Joseph J. Daniels, rebuilt also <strong><br /> Creek: </strong>Coal Creek <br /> <strong>Location: </strong>Located at Lodi and 1/2 mile south of Silverwood. <strong><br /> Reference Code: </strong>#33, 14-61 -30, 12-61 -33, rb, Liberty 2-17N&mdash;9W <strong><br /> Size: </strong>170 ft long +12&rsquo; +12&rsquo;, 16 ft wide, 13 ft clearance<br /> <strong>Truss:</strong> Burr Arch 1 span<br /> <strong>Foundation: </strong>Stone reinforced by wood rip rap<br /> <strong>Original Cost: </strong>$7,000&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Repair/Restoration History: </strong>J.J. Daniels was paid $2.25 in 1873 for visiting and examining the bridge. The embankment was repaired in 1874. Destroyed by arson in 1992.</p> <p><strong>Bridge History: </strong>Also known as Lodi Bridge. Lazurus Shirk settled on Coal Creek in 1826. James Marks came in March 1830. The east hill of Lodi was called Golderay. The town was platted on April 11,1836, and named Fullerton by Peter Blakewell. It was owned by Jesse Bowen and Elijah Thompson. It may have been named for Robert Fulton, who built the first successful steamboat.</p> <p>The name of the town was changed to Lodi on January 26,1837. It may have been named for a city near Milan, Italy, where Napoleon won a great victory over the Austrians in 1796. The Post Office was called Lodiville.</p> <p>In 1857, the name of the town was changed to Waterman in honor of Dr. Waterman who moved to the town with his business enterprises of a pork packing plant and store. An R.M. Waterman owned large coal fields north of the town in 1874. Lodi was quite prosperous during the ten years the Wabash and Erie Canal was in operation. The last canal boat passed Lodi on the way to Lafayette in 1875. The feeder dam for the canal can be seen from the covered bridge.</p> <p>Joseph J. Daniels built the covered bridge in 1869 for $7,000 and after major damages, rebuilt it in 1898. He said it was harder to do the rebuilding than it was to do the original construction. In the 1880&rsquo;s Lodi businesses and buildings included the Lewis Davis and Charles Bright flour mill, a drug store, a dry goods store, grocery store, two blacksmith shops, a sawmill, a Masonic Lodge, a G.A.R. Post, and a school.</p> <p>A health spa was in operation for many years, built around the Lodi Artesian Well north of town. The well was purchased in 1913 by Chicago capitalists. They placed a large pipe into the well that flowed into a basin. A large dance pavilion and a baseball diamond were built. The resort was most popular through the depression. The pavilion was converted to a roller skating rink. The well was used to fill the swimming pool. The business came to an end when Fred Clingan attempted to clean out the well pipe and instead plugged it. While many were sad to close a landmark, others expressed gratitude for relief from the sulfurous smell of the water.</p> <p>The Lodi Iron Bridge crosses the Wabash. It was built in 1906 by the Lafayette Engineering Company of Lafayette, Indiana, and engineered by Fred Rush of Terre Haute. Lodi remains a small town served by a garage, thrift shop, sign shop, mower and bait shop, vegetable stand, and archery and gun shop.</p> <p>In 1991, the portal lettering incorrectly identified both J.A. Britton and J.J Daniels as builders. The roof is of wood shingles, and antique style advertising has been reapplied.</p> <p>Sadly, this bridge was lost to arson in 1999.&nbsp;</p>
<p><strong>Built:</strong> 1917<br /> <strong>Builder:</strong> W.C. Carty <br /> <strong>Creek: </strong>Little Raccoon Creek <br /> <strong>Location:</strong> Located northeast of Guion, southwest of Waveland, 4 miles northeast of Judson.<br /> <strong>Reference Code: </strong>(#3), 14-61-22, 12-61-24, mb, Green 5-16N&mdash;6W <br /> <strong>Size: </strong>73 ft long +11&rsquo; + 11&rsquo;, 16 ft wide<br /> <strong>Truss: </strong>Burr Arch 1 span<br /> <strong>Foundation:</strong> Concrete&nbsp;&nbsp; <strong><br /> </strong></p> <p><strong>Repair/Restoration History: </strong>Destroyed by fire 1960. Replaced by Portland Mills, moved 18 miles, January 1961. Bypassed by ford in creek&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Bridge History: </strong>The Dooley Station Bridge was named for the Dooley family. Joseph 0. Dooley was born in 1860, owned 4.5 acres, and farmed 100 acres on the Grass Knoll Farm. His son, Albert G. Dooley, owned 103 acres southwest of the Dooley Station Bridge.</p> <p>Earlier, Purdie J. Dooley rented and farmed 159 acres nearby. Owen R. Dooley owned the land around the Dooley Station bridge site through the 1960&rsquo;s, while David and Julie Dooley owned it in 1990. The railroad station and town named Dooley Station was established in 1861 when the Vandalia Railroad was built. It included a ticket office, stock pens, blacksmith shop, several homes, and a school. The Dooley Station Bridge was destroyed by fire on a December Sunday night in 1960. The fire was discovered about 9:30 by Sam Link and Joe Long. They reported a car fleeing the scene with its lights off. They ran to the home of Mr. and Mrs. Albert Dooley to phone the Waveland and Bellmore fire departments and the Parke County Sheriff. Another incident occurred the same evening. Heavy equipment parked nearby and used in constructing a replacement bridge had been moved onto the Thorpe Ford Bridge, in an attempt to overload it.</p> <p>Six young men were arrested and held in the Parke County Jail. On the following Tuesday they were arraigned before Judge Clarence J. Powel. Their case was continued to December 17 and bond was set at $2000. After the trial, four were fined $8,000 and sentenced to 104 days in jail.</p> <p>They were reported to have driven to the scene and sprinkled kerosene on the bridge before setting it on fire. No reason was given for setting the fire. An interior photograph of the bridge shows that the arches were formed of six straight pieces, each about 12 feet long. Most Burr Arches were formed of steam bent .and carved arched pieces 24 feet or longer.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</p>
<p><strong>Built:</strong> 1899<br /> <strong>Builder:</strong> Joseph J. Daniels <br /> <strong>Creek: </strong>Sugar Mill Creek <br /> <strong>Location:</strong> Located 3 miles north of Turkey Run State Park and 1 mile west of Grange Corner.<br /> <strong>Reference Code: </strong>(#34), 14-61-37, 12-61-40, su, Sugar Creek 4/9-17N&mdash;7W <br /> <strong>Size:</strong> 113 ft long<br /> <strong>Truss: </strong>Burr Arch 1 span<br /> <strong>Foundation: </strong>Concrete $945 constructed by Thomas Alward<br /> <strong>Original Cost:</strong> $1,485 + $945 = $2,430&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Repair/Restoration History: </strong>Destroyed by flood in 1968.</p> <p><strong>Bridge History:</strong> Also known as &quot;Delp Bridge&quot;</p> <p>Many times in the covered bridge bid process the bridge and abutments were bid separately and awarded separately.</p> <p>Joseph J. Daniels bid $1485 for the superstructure and Thomas Alward bid $945 for the abutments for a total of $2430, while J.J. Daniels bid $2520 for the total job.</p> <p>Grange Corner was earlier called Grangeburg. It was named after a large Grange store operated there by John Lundgren.</p> <p>Mr. and lona Alward opened a larger store there in 1912, combined with a blacksmith shop and feed grinding business.</p> <p>The Grangers was an organization of farmers designed to deal directly with the customer, eliminating &quot;drummers&quot; and middle men. The organization was begun after the Panic of 1873, when national inflation broke many farmers. Grangers were active for about ten years with chapters all over Parke County. The loss of the Grange Corner Bridge was also a lost game of bureaucratic &quot;chicken&quot;. The Parke County Highway Department goal of maintaining county roads with limited funding often conflicts with Parke County Incorporated&rsquo;s goal of maintaining covered bridges. The abutments of the bridge were inspected and declared unsafe. However, repairs were deferred while funding was sought.</p> <p>During a 1968 flood, one of the bridge abutments was washed away. The Grange Corner Bridge fell into the creek bed.</p> <p>Some witnesses have claimed that the bridge was not destroyed and could have been jacked out of the creek bed pending removal as a complete unit. Published photographs show it in much worse condition. Funds were still not available to preserve or move the bridge. County funds were made available to demolish the bridge.&nbsp;</p>
<p><strong>Built: </strong>Before 1863<br /> <strong>Builder: </strong>Henry Wolf (unconfirmed) <br /> <strong>Creek:</strong> Little Raccoon Creek <br /> <strong>Location:</strong> Located 1 1/4 mile southeast of Coxville, 1 mile northeast of Rosedale on abandoned segment of Greencastle Road. <br /> <strong>Reference Code:</strong> (#41) Florida 23-14N&mdash;8W (unconfirmed) <br /> <br /> <strong>Repair/Restoration History: </strong>Repaired by Joseph J. Daniels in 1863. Dismantled by Joseph J. Daniels in 1863. </p> <p><strong>Bridge History: </strong>The first reference encountered for this bridge was an old resident in the 1960&rsquo;s pointing down the road and saying something to the effect: &quot;That used to be a through road to Coxville. There used to be a covered bridge on it, but l think it washed away before I can remember.&quot; </p> <p>The actual location (or existence) of this bridge still remains in dispute. Parke County maps from 1880 and 1917 show the Greencastle Road crossing Big Raccoon at the same location as the Vandalia Railroad bridge. A 1927 map no longer shows this portion of the road. Other older residents still recall using this road and crossing Big Raccoon Creek at a ford south of Coxville through the 1930&rsquo;s. Prior to 1880 it is possible that during high water the Big Raccoon Railroad Bridge, was used by pedestrians and horsemen. Today&rsquo;s topographic maps continue to label the Greencastle Road on both sides of the abandoned segment. County records show that in 1863, Joseph J. Daniels was paid $40 to repair the Greencastle Road Bridge. Later in 1863, J.J. Daniels was contracted to dismantle the Greencastle Road Bridge. He accomplished the task and piled the pieces nearby. The county commissioners considered reconstruction of the bridge in 1865. A location 300 yards upstream &quot;in line with a certain dead oak tree&quot; was considered. Dan Chamberlain&rsquo;s research indicated that the bridge was never rebuilt and he supposed it rolled where it had been piled. Juliet Snowden, however, believed these records referred to the covered bridge on the Rockville-Greencastle Road, now called the New Discovery Road, and that Joseph J. Daniels rebuilt it in 1867 as the Crooks Bridge. </p> <p>Joseph J. Daniels was also awarded an $11,450 contract to build the County Poor Farm&rsquo;s main building in October 1863. The work was completed in June 1865, and the building was used until it burned down in the 1920&rsquo;s. </p> <p>Located east of the bridge site and the junction of Big and Little Raccoon creeks, a school house was built in 1839. It was used for both church and school. Jacob Kirkendall organized a predestinarian Baptist congregation in August 1841, and in 1853, built the Liberty Baptist Church across the road. In 1859, the church divided, and in 1863, the Missionary Baptists built the Friendly Grove Baptist Church 1/4 mile southeast from the Liberty Church. The Adams Cemetery, started in 1822, is nearby. Other divisions of the church led to the Big Raccoon Church, about 1926, two miles west, and the Rosedale Baptist Church. Two churches, a school yard and a cemetery are located near the intersection of the Greencastle and Rockville Rosedale Roads. </p> <p>The rendition is based on the Crooks and Portland Mills Bridges, which have the squared off &quot;Wolf Portal&quot;.&nbsp; </p>
<p><strong>Built: </strong>1916<br /> <strong>Builder:</strong> Joseph A. Britton <br /> <strong>Creek:</strong> Big Raccoon Creek branch <br /> <strong>Location:</strong> Located 1 mile west of Portland Mills. <br /> <strong>Reference Code:</strong> (#47) 12-61-22, kf, Union 2-15N&mdash;6W<br /> <strong>Truss: </strong>Burr Arch 1 span&nbsp;&nbsp; </p> <p><strong>Repair/Restoration History: </strong>Site now covered by Lake Mansfield. Second bridge at this site. Replaced 1847 Margrave Bridge. Destroyed by fire in 1943.&nbsp; </p> <p><strong>Bridge History: </strong>The Harbison Bridge was named for the Harbison family. They owned land around Portland Mills. In 1920, James D. Harbison, who was born in 1868, owned 130 acres. James K. Harbison, who was born in 1859, owned 75 acres. J. Howard Harbison, who was born in 1858 owned 80 acres. In the 1950&rsquo;s Donald Harbison owned the land around the bridge site. </p> <p>The bridge was destroyed on December 22, 1943. A truck wrecked and ruptured an oil pipeline. Leaking oil from the pipeline saturated the bridge and when ignited, it burned down quickly. The earlier Hargrave Bridge was destroyed by the flood of 1913. J.A. Britton also replaced the Plank Road and Cox Ford bridges destroyed in that flood. </p> <p>The Harbison Bridge site is now covered by Raccoon Lake during most of the year.</p>
<p><strong>Built: </strong>1847<br /> <strong>Builder: </strong>Joseph J. Daniels (unconfirmed) <br /> <strong>Creek:</strong> Big Raccoon Creek branch <br /> <strong>Location: </strong>Located one mile west of Portland Mills. <br /> <strong>Reference Code:</strong> (#47b) Union 2-15N-6W<br /> <strong>Truss: </strong>Burr Arch 1 span&nbsp;&nbsp; </p> <p><strong>Repair/Restoration History:</strong> Destroyed by 1913 flood. Replaced by Harbison Bridge in 1916. </p> <p><strong>Bridge History: </strong>Named for A.A. Hargrave, a Rockville editor who lived to be over 100 years old. A photograph of the Hargrave Bridge shows the date 1847, but the names on the portal are not legible. It is clearly in the same style as the Jackson Bridge. It is believed to have been built by J.J. Daniels, but there are no definite records. There is a record of J.J. Daniels building the Union Township Bridge in 1851. While it is possible this is the same bridge, it is more likely that the Union Township Bridge was built at the Hollandsburg site. The Hargrave Bridge was destroyed in the flood of 1913- The Armiesburg Covered Bridge, the Plank Road Covered Bridge, and the Cox Ford Iron Bridge were destroyed by the same flood, and the abutments of the West Union Covered Bridge were damaged.&nbsp; </p>
<p><strong>Built:</strong> 1866<br /> <strong>Builder:</strong> Joseph J. Daniels <br /> <strong>Creek:</strong> Sugar Creek <br /> <strong>Location:</strong> Located north of West Union <br /> <strong>Reference Code:</strong> (#53) Reserve 6-16N&mdash;8W <br /> <strong>Size:</strong> approx. 250 ft long<br /> <strong>Truss: </strong>Burr Arch 2 span<br /> <strong>Foundation: </strong>Hewn stone<br /> <strong>Original Cost:</strong> $5,725&nbsp;&nbsp; </p> <p><strong>Repair/Restoration History: </strong>Damaged by high water, December 1875. Repaired by J.J. Daniels for $600. Replaced by West Union Bridge in September 1876. Second bridge this location. Replaced the Star Mills Bridge.</p> <p><strong>Bridge History: </strong>The earlier Star Mills Bridge was destroyed by a flood in 1866, and the County Commissioners paid J.J. Daniels $269.66 to remove the bridge from the creek. </p> <p>The Commissioners awarded a contract for $5,725 on July 14,1866, to Joseph J. Daniels to replace the Star Mills Bridge. It was completed in 1866. The bridge was named the Harrison Bridge in honor of Territorial Governor and President William Henry Harrison. The earlier bridge has been called Star Mills and Harrison #1. </p> <p>There are no available photographs; thus it is unclear whether the Harrison Bridge most resembled the Jackson Bridge, or the later West Union Bridge of more familiar design. The earlier contract to recover the materials from the earlier bridge and the reduction for this contact to $5,725 from $18,000 for the earlier bridge is an indication that most of the materials were reused from the previous bridge. The same abutments were also apparently reused. </p> <p>Joseph J. Daniels constructed this bridge the same year as he built the Roseville Bridge. This bridge was built in the closing years of the Wabash &amp; Erie Canal. It had already closed in Lyford in 1863. During its construction, the canal had furnished employment for hundreds of laborers, and during its operation, continued to furnish jobs both directly indirectly. West Union decreased until the railroad came and new facilities were built for rail transportation. Some businesses moved west to border the railroad tracks. Many businesses such as the Post Office, stockyards, elevator, general stores, and gas station prospered with the railroad. The railroad went bankrupt in 1921 but was resold. It closed in 1941. The remains of the railroad overpass and Sugar Creek bridge can be seen near the present bridges. </p> <p>Since the bridges and abutments were catastrophically damaged in both 1866 and 1875, it seems that the span was too narrow and the bridges too low to withstand the recurring freshets. The spans of the replacement West Union Bridge were about 65 feet wider and may have been higher, allowing a considerable increased volume of water to pass. </p> <p>The bridge was damaged by flood waters in December, 1875, and J.J. Daniels completed repairs for $600. The replacement West Union Bridge was completed in September, 1876. The references seem to indicate that the Harrison Bridge was still in use during the construction of the West Union Bridge. The rendition makes many assumptions including concurrence, style, and location.&nbsp; </p>
<p><strong>Built: </strong>1872<br /> <strong>Builder: </strong>Joseph J. Daniels <br /> <strong>Creek: </strong>Big Raccoon Creek <br /> <strong>Location:</strong> Located on an older US 36 roadbed south of present route, now covered by Lake Mansfield. <strong>Reference Code: </strong>(#46) Union 10-15N&mdash;6W<br /> <strong>Truss:</strong> Burr Arch 1 span<br /> <strong>Foundation: </strong>Hewn stone<br /> <strong>Original Cost:</strong> $7,000&nbsp;&nbsp; <strong><br /> </strong></p> <p><strong>Repair/Restoration History: </strong>Replaced Union Township Bridge. Torn down about 1930 during US 36 upgrade. Replaced.</p> <p><strong>Bridge History:</strong> The Noble Mill was built on Big Raccoon Creek south of Hollandsburg in 1829 by John Noble. John McGilvery hauled the burrs from Vigo County. The dam was constructed in layers of stone and timber. </p> <p>John Ceilings built a hewed log house in Hollandsburg in 1855, Abraham Ceilings built a 6&rsquo;x24&rsquo;store nearby. The Collings named the town in honor of a Baptist minister from Kentucky, named Holland. Other early businesses and buildings included Harvey Connelly&rsquo;s blacksmith shop, Robert Daniel&rsquo;s wagon making shop, William Brackall&rsquo;s shoe shop, and the 1859 Baptist Church. </p> <p>Hollandsburg was on the Plank Road between Indianapolis and Montezuma. The planks soon rotted and the road was purchased by the county commissioners, graveled, and made into a free road. The Union Township Bridge was constructed during the Plank Road era, and the replacement Hollandsburg Bridge during the time of the free county road. </p> <p>The Parke County Commissioners advertised for bids for the Hollandsburg Bridge in early 1872. Bids were opened on April 9, 1872, and included: J.J. Daniels;$7,000, William Blackledge and James Moyers;$7,300. (W.BIackledge and J. Movers also competed with J.J. Daniels for the Mecca Bridge in 1873. </p> <p>The Baptists held services south of the Bridge. </p> <p>A youth named Hooker was reportedly shot on this bridge. </p> <p>In spite of worker intimidation, the bridge was torn down in about 1930 during construction of US Highway 36. A truck load of angry men roared up to workers at the bridge site and made threats. They were angry over the tow wage scale and hiring practices. The Parke County Sheriff deputized a posse of 15 men and stationed them at the jail in Rockville. Two state policemen patrolled the area. U.S. Marshals issued subpoenas to 15 people in Clinton and Montezuma. Although the threats were repeated along the route and in Montezuma, trouble never came. </p> <p>In the 1960&rsquo;s preparations were made for the Mansfield Reservoir. Highway 36 was moved, and a new bridge was constructed over the Big Raccoon Creek bed that was also to span the new lake. The Union Township, Holiandsburg, Hargrave, Harbison, and Portland Mills, covered bridge sites were all covered by Lake Mansfield.</p>
<p><strong>Built:</strong> 1913<br /> <strong>Builder: </strong>Joseph A. Britton<br /> <strong>Creek:</strong> Little Raccoon <br /> <strong>Location:</strong> Located 3 miles east of Rockville on present US 36 <br /> <strong>Reference Code:</strong> (#44) Adams 10-15N-8W<br /> <strong>Truss: </strong>Burr Arch 1 span<br /> <strong>Foundation:</strong> Stone&nbsp; </p> <p><strong>Repair/Restoration History: </strong>Replaced Plank Road Bridge, which was destroyed in 1913 flood. Replaced by iron bridge in 1931 or 1932 during building of US 36. <br /> <br /> <strong>Bridge History: </strong>The Howard Bridge was built in 1913 to replace the Plank Road Bridge, which was damaged in the 1913 flood. Joseph A. Britton retained the unique look of the earlier bridge. Unlike his &quot;Button Portal,&quot; this portal had the squared off opening and rounded false front hiding a normal peak roof, very much like the earlier Plank Road Bridge.<br /> <br /> Joseph A. Britton constructed the nearby State Sanatorium Bridge on the other side of the State Sanatorium property and the Cox Ford Bridge on Sugar Creek on the traditional Britton plan that same year. <br /> <br /> There are photographs showing the bridge in 1916 and texts describing it as still in good condition in 1927. The last remnants of the Plank Road were dug up and the road was reconstructed east of the Howard Bridge site in about 1930 as US 36 was built. At the same time period, the bridge was replaced with a two lane iron bridge. The swampy ground had preserved the oak planks of the Plank Road from the 1850&rsquo;s to the 1930&rsquo;s.<br /> <br /> The Howard Bridge may have been named for General Tilghman Ashurst Howard, a Rockville favorite son, He was born in 1797 in South Carolina. His mother died when he was two months old, and he was raised by his half brother, John McElroy.</p> <p>At age 19, he was a school teacher and store clerk in Newport, East Tennessee. By age 21, he was a lawyer and at 27 was elected to the Tennessee State Senate. He moved to Bloomington, Indiana, in 1830 and to Rockville in 1832. He was appointed as Indiana Attorney General from 1833 until 1839, when he was elected to Congress. In 1835 he was commissioned by President Jackson to investigate the growing conflicts over Indian treaty claims. In February 1844, he went to Washington D.C. to promote The Wabash &amp; Erie Canal in spite of political resistance at home. In June 1844 he was appointed by President Tyler as Charge d&rsquo;Affaires to the Republic of Mexico. In August, on his trip through Texas, he died. In 1847 his body was returned for burial in his own orchard in Rockville.</p>
<p><strong>Built:</strong> 1897<br /> <strong>Builder:</strong> Pearly Weaver and Geroge Weaver <br /> <strong>Creek: </strong>Square Rock Branch, moved to dry ground <br /> <strong>Location:</strong> Located in Penn Township, north of Annapolis, 2 1/2 miles west of Turkey Run. <br /> <strong>Reference Code: </strong>14-61 -39, 12-61 -42, X2, Penn 31 -17N&mdash;7W <br /> <strong>Size:</strong> 42 ft long +4&rsquo; +4&rsquo;, 12 ft wide, 12&rsquo; clearance<br /> <strong>Truss: </strong>Modified Queen Post 1 span<br /> <strong>Foundation: </strong>Square rocks from branch<br /> <strong>Original Cost:</strong> $2.50/day&nbsp;&nbsp; </p> <p><strong>Repair/Restoration History: </strong>Moved to Jordan and Woody Farm as barn about 1970. Destroyed.</p> <p><strong>Bridge History:</strong> Also known as &quot;Jordan Bridge&quot; </p> <p>This structure was one of five privately owned covered bridges. The other four include State Sanatorium, the Lusk Covered Bridges and Clinton. It was one of two Queen Post type covered bridges in Parke County. The other was the Turkey Run Bridge. </p> <p>William Kennedy and Sarah Russell Kennedy were some of the earliest settlers in this area. James Russell owned the farm later. Hugh Russell, Sarah&rsquo;s brother, settled on the other side of Sugar Creek. A Mr. Davis, a member of the Covered Bridge committee of the State Historical Society, interviewed Pearly Weaver. Pearly Weaver was only 24 years old when he built the bridge in 1897 for J. H. Russell. He was assisted by his brother, George. </p> <p>Having no experience in bridge building, he secured a book and drew up the plans. The abutments were constructed by a craftsman who had just completed a similar job nearby. He set up a derrick and lifted stones from the stream bed to build the abutments. The stones were uniform in thickness and were the reason it was called Square Rock Branch. The greater part of the materials were secured on the Russell Farm and labor was cheap, so the bridge cost was comparatively low. He remembered receiving $2.50 a day. He said he remembered looking through the woods to find two oak trees tall and straight enough to make the stringer beams. The trees were 21/2 feet in diameter and 50 feet long, squaring 12 inches at the top. The joists in the bridge, the side posts, and the nail ties were of clear poplar taken from an old cabin that had been located nearby. The trusses were made of maple and oak from the farm. </p> <p>Captain James Russell is said to have wanted the bridge built so he would not have to be carried through the stream when he died. A James R. Russell operated the Armiesburg Mill near the Armiesburg Covered Bridge. </p> <p>Ralph Jordan bought the farm and bridge. In 1944, he built an airport called &quot;Port 0&rsquo; the Woods&quot;. Later the bridge was moved to dry ground and used as a barn. It deteriorated and was eventually torn down.</p>
<p><strong>Built:</strong> 1915<br /> <strong>Builder:</strong> Joseph A. Britton &amp; Sons <br /> <strong>Creek: </strong>Big Raccoon Creek <br /> <strong>Location:</strong> Located 2 miles southeast of Bridgeton. <br /> <strong>Reference Code:</strong> #9,14-61-03,12-61-03, be, Raccoon 29-14N&mdash;7W <br /> <strong>Size:</strong> 204 ft long, +9&rsquo; +9&rsquo;, 16 ft wide, 13&rsquo;clearance<br /> <strong>Truss:</strong> Burr Arch 2 span<br /> <strong>Foundation: </strong>Concrete&nbsp;&nbsp; </p> <p><strong>Bridge History: </strong>This bridge was built on the Jeffries Ford site. </p> <p>The portal is in the Britton form and is lettered J.M. May, W.T.Motter, LJ.Linebarger Commissioners, J.H. Rush Treasurer, Charles Davis Auditor, H.L. Davies Engineer, J.A. Britton Builder, 1915 Jeffries Ford Bridge. The roof is of corrugated galvanized steel. This bridge is unusual in that most J.A. Britton Bridges were shorter and single span. </p> <p>J.A. Britton was 75 at the time this bridge was completed. Throughout his career as a bridge builder, he was assisted by his family. At this period construction was by his sons. He had 4 sons by his first wife and 5 by his second wife. Eugene Britton built Bowsher Ford, the same year. Some of the other bridges built by J.A. Britton include: Narrows in 1882, Sim Smith, in 1883, Leatherwood Station in 1899, Harry Evans in 1908, Zacke Cox in 1908, Weisner, in 1908, Philips, in 1909, Moore, in 1909, Thorpe Ford in 1912, State Sanatorium in 1913, Howard in 1913, Cox Ford in 1913, McAllister in 1914, Harbison in 1916, Marshall in 1917, and Nevins in 1920.</p>
<p><strong>Built: </strong>1910, moved 1970<br /> <strong>Builder: </strong>Jefferson P. Van Fossen, moved by Elmer Buchta <br /> <strong>Creek: </strong>Little Raccoon, moved to Little Raccoon <br /> <strong>Location: </strong>Located 1/2 mile north of Jessup. <br /> <strong>Reference Code:</strong> (#15), 14-61-06,12-61-06, ca, Floridal 3/14-14N&mdash;8W Moved to Adams/Washington<br /> <strong>Size: </strong>155 ft long, +10&rsquo; +10&rsquo;, 16 ft wide, 13&rsquo; clearance, 122 tons<br /> <strong>Truss: </strong>Double Burr Arch 1 Span<br /> <strong>Foundation: </strong>Concrete, moved to concrete</p> <p><strong>Repair/Restoration History: </strong>Condemned 1966. Bypassed 1969. Moved to replace Adams Bridge February 3-11, 1970. Bypassed 1988. Destroyed by flood 1989. </p> <p><strong>Bridge History: </strong>The area was once called Rabbit Town. Later, when the Pumpkin Vine Railroad was constructed, it became Jessup&rsquo;s Station. Peasant Hawkins and Monroe Barney shipped a barrel of pork from Terre Haute to &quot;Jessup&quot;. George W. Jessup lived there and gave the station the name. Jessup&rsquo;s Station was once a busy station and control point on the railroad. There were six passenger trains a day and coal trains switching to nearby Mine Number One, Mine Number Two, and Bright Jim Mine. Fourteen carloads of sand passed through each day. The town of Jessup once included a hotel, stable, post office, blacksmith, sawmill, two country stores, and two gasoline stations. Earlier maps of Parke County do not show a road north out of Jessup. The preferred route to Rockville was through Coxville. The north road was probably built about the same time as the bridge. However, there was an east-west road just north of the bridge site that has now disappeared. That road may have crossed Little Raccoon near the Little Raccoon Railroad Covered Bridge. The Jessup Bridge was bypassed in 1969. After Adams Bridge, was destroyed by a flood in 1969, it was decided to replace it with the Jessup Bridge. Elmer Buchta of Buchta Trucking was contracted to make the move. He spent several days removing the south abutment. Then he jacked the bridge onto two sets of multi-wheeled dollies. On Tuesday, February 3, 1970, he began the road trip. The bridge was pulled to Catlin. It took 3 1/2 hours to get around the 90 degree curves. It was held overnight at Catlin. On Wednesday, the bridge was taken from Catlin to Rockville. It was slowed by three county bridges. Although the highway department had applied one and a half feet of fill dirt over the bridge deck, additional cribbing was required to allow the bridge to clear the concrete rails. The bridge was parked overnight in front of Ferguson Lumber. On Thursday, it was up the hill to the courthouse square. The traffic lights were removed, and the bridge was turned right onto US 36. It was conveyed to the road leading to the Adams Farm. On the weekend, disaster struck. The weather warmed and the ground thawed. The move came to a halt. Monday, the temperature dropped to zero. The ground refroze. Wednesday, the bridge was pulled across a big field and jacked into place 12 miles from its original abutments. In 1989 a flood destroyed the Jessup Bridge. A large tree broke the arches, and the bridge collapsed. It floated under the State Sanatorium Bridge, and over the US 36 concrete bridge at the Plank Road site and jammed downstream. In a telephone interview, September 11, 1990, representatives of Parke County Incorporated were unaware of the disposition of the Jessup Bridge even though they were attempting to acquire the Cedar Ford Bridge from Shelby County. They deferred to the County Highway Department. In the follow-up telephone interview, Tom Martin, County Highway Superintendent, stated that they had located the Jessup Covered Bridge and recovered the laminated floor boards. He explained that the major recurring county highway maintenance on covered bridges was replacement of the floorboards. He also acknowledged that the poplar framing of the bridge was no longer available, but he said the Jessup framing was tied together with the iron tension rods, too hard to recover from the creek, and unneeded for other bridge repair.&nbsp; </p>
<p><strong>Built:</strong> Before 1869, probably 1867 <br /> <strong>Creek:</strong> Coal Creek <br /> <strong>Location:</strong> Located in Lodi 100 yards upstream from existing Coal Creek Bridge, #33. <br /> <strong>Reference Code:</strong> (#50), (#33c), Liberty 2-17N&mdash;9W<br /> <strong>Truss:</strong> Burr Arch 1 span (unconfirmed)<br /> <strong>Foundation:</strong> Stone</p> <p><strong>Bridge History:</strong> Also known as Coal Creek Bridge #3.</p> <p>This may have been the bridge destroyed in the 1875 flood. James Myers was paid $300.00 for taking a bridge out of the creek at Lodi. He probably used these materials to build the Lodi #2, Bridge. There is a grade on Coal Creek about 100 yards upstream from the existing bridge pointing north toward the Silverwood Road.</p>
<p><strong>Built:</strong> 1878<br /> <strong>Builder:</strong> James Myers <br /> <strong>Creek: </strong>Coal Creek <br /> <strong>Location: </strong>Located in Lodi 100 yards upstream from existing Coal Creek Bridge, #33. <br /> <strong>Reference Code:</strong> (#55), (#33b), Liberty 2-17N&mdash;9W<br /> <strong>Truss:</strong> Burr Arch 1 span (unconfirmed)<br /> <strong>Foundation:</strong> Stone<br /> <strong>Original Cost: </strong>$4,000&nbsp;&nbsp; </p> <p><strong>Bridge History: </strong>Also known as Coal Creek Bridge #2. The low original cost is probably due to reuse of materials that James Myers was paid $300.00 to remove from the creek. </p> <p>The materials may have been from the Lodi #3, (#33c), Bridge or some other local one. There are two grades upstream from the present covered bridge. Both point north toward Silverwood.&nbsp; </p>
<p><strong>Built: </strong>1840<br /> <strong>Builder: </strong>Salmon Lusk <br /> <strong>Creek: </strong>Sugar Creek <br /> <strong>Location: </strong>Located next to Lusk Mill at the Narrows, east of Turkey Run State Park. <br /> <strong>Reference Code: </strong>Sugar Creek 26-17N&mdash;7W<br /> <strong>Truss:</strong> Lattice (unconfirmed) 2 lane 1 span&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Repair/Restoration History: </strong>Destroyed by the January 1, 1847, freshet that also destroyed the Lusk Mill and stores. Replaced in 1847.</p> <p><strong>Bridge History: </strong>Captain Salmon Lusk was a member of General William Henry Harrison&rsquo;s 1811 expedition. He was sent to scout a route to Prophet&rsquo;s Town. He traveled up the east side of the Wabash River to the mouth of Sugar Creek. He continued up the east side of Sugar Creek to the Narrows. After the march on and the battle at Prophet&rsquo;s Town in 1811, he spent some time at Ft. Harrison. In 1825, he received a grant of one thousand acres for his military service. He traveled with his wife, Polly Beard Lusk, on horseback to the Narrows. They built a log cabin on the hill above the Narrows. Salmon Lusk built his mill in 1826. Prior to that time, settlers had to travel to Alamo or Roseville. In 1830, he began packing and shipping pork to New Orleans. Flour, grain, and furs were also shipped. He built a sawmill onto his mill. That same year, Prior Wright opened a store there. There are stories of Mrs. Lusk crossing an early, narrow, precarious log bridge at the Narrows balancing with a bucket of milk in each hand on her way to aid a neighbor. Another story describes an open bridge at the Narrows made of hewn timbers. It had a rickety railing of 4 x 4 scantlings on posts of the same size. It was narrow but wide enough for a wagon to cross. Most passengers dismounted and crossed walking. Records seem to indicate that Salmon Lusk built a two lane covered bridge in 1840. It is believed to have been upstream from the present bridge. The materials were probably gathered and sawed on his land. In 1841, Salmon Lusk replaced the log cabin with a brick house. The clay came from his farm and the bricks were burned in the yard. The floors and frame were made of poplar taken from his woods, and sawed in his sawmill. On January 1, New Years Day, 1847, the Lusk Mill, the Lusk Covered Bridge, Prior Wright&rsquo;s Store and all other associated buildings were washed away by a freshet on Sugar Creek. A freshet is a flood combined with a thaw/breakout of winter ice.</p>
<p><strong>Built: </strong>1847, repaired 1866<br /> <strong>Builder:</strong> Salmon Lusk, repaired by William Blackledge <br /> <strong>Creek: </strong>Sugar Creek <br /> <strong>Location:</strong> Located next to Lusk Mill site at the Narrows, east side of Turkey Run State Park. May have been upstream from the present bridges. <br /> <strong>Reference Code:</strong> (#54) Sugar Creek 26-17N&mdash;7W<br /> <strong>Truss: </strong>Lattice (unconfirmed)<br /> <strong>Original Cost:</strong> Repair cost $800</p> <p><strong>Repair/Restoration History:</strong> Destroyed in 1875, replaced in 1882. May have been fourth bridge at this site.</p> <p><strong>Bridge History:</strong> Salmon Lusk is believed to have replaced the earlier Lusk Covered Bridge the same year it was destroyed in the New Years Day freshet. It is believed to have been a two lane covered bridge with lattice trusses. The mill and stores were never rebuilt. Prior Wright moved his businesses to Rockport, the future site of the Jackson Bridge. </p> <p>County records show that William Blackledge was hired by the county in 1866 for $800 to repair this bridge. It was damaged in the same flood as the Harrison Bridge. In 1854, Salmon Lusk deeded four acres to erect a Methodist Church. It burned down during the Civil War. It was rebuilt in 1865 and became the &quot;Lusk Chapel&quot;. Years later, John Lusk provided wood and workmen to build a churchyard fence. </p> <p>Captain Salmon Lusk died in 1869, leaving a thousand acres to John Lusk and his mother. Polly Beard Lusk is remembered as a loving mother and a good neighbor. Children were welcomed to her home, always leaving with sugar lumps or fruit in their pocket, and when a neighbor was sick, she went quickly to provide aid and comfort. </p> <p>Polly Lusk died in 1880, and John Lusk became a recluse. He lived alone in the house for 35 years. He boarded up the windows to her room. Accounts of John Lusk&rsquo;s life say that as a boy, he once wondered away from home for several days and was found sleeping peacefully with a pack of wild hogs. As a young man, he prospected for gold in California. As a hermit, he was huge and strong with gnarled powerful hands, long bushy hair, and a matted beard. Some said he used a cheese barrel as a cupboard for his dishes and food and the lid on his lap for a table. Others describe how he picked up a heavy oak chair in his teeth and carried it around the room. When he sheared sheep he was said to grab the sheep&rsquo;s tail in his teeth and throw it out of the barn. </p> <p>Yet, those who knew him said he was generous and kind hearted. Andrew Robbins told how he was welcome in John&rsquo;s house and how John would visit his invalid mother, bringing her fresh fish and good food from his land. He was well educated for his day, intelligent, and had memorized long passages of Bible scripture. John Lusk died in 1915 and was buried beside his parents in the grave yard of the Lusk Chapel. John Lusk&rsquo;s land, which included the present Turkey Run State Park, was very valuable to him. Many lumber companies and others offered him high prices for the timber he would not sell. </p> <p>Visitors were coming to Turkey Run very early. One story is told of a group coming from Bloomingdale in 1856. In 1881, sometime after Polly Lusk&rsquo;s death, the Indianapolis, Decatur, and Springfield Railroad leased an area of Turkey Run. They built an eating house and bought and erected tents for camping. They called the area Bloomingdale Glens and transported the tourists from the railroad station at Marshall. </p> <p>William Hooghkirk leased the park area from 1884 to 1910 and returned the name to Turkey Run. In 1910 Indiana Governor Goodrich leased the park till 1917. As the lease expiration approached, panic set in and a commission was formed to purchase the park for the state. The property was appraised at $18,000, but the uncut timber was worth much more. The sale took place on May 18, 1916. The commission had raised $20,000, but the Hoosier Veneer Company managed to purchased the land. Richard Lieber, Juliet Straus, J. D. Adams, and others led the campaign to raise the funds to buy the park from the lumber company before they began cutting the timber. They were successful in buying the land in 1917 but at a cost of $40,200, over half of which was provided by Carl Fisher, Mr. Newby and the Speedway Association.&nbsp;</p>
<p><strong>Built:</strong> 1909<br /> <strong>Builder:</strong> Joseph A. Britton <br /> <strong>Creek: </strong>South Fork Little Raccoon Creek <br /> <strong>Location:</strong> Located 2 miles north of Judson and southeast of Guion. <br /> <strong>Reference Code: </strong>(#49), 12-61&mdash;25, mh, Greene 17-16N&mdash;7W <br /> <strong>Size:</strong> 65 ft long +8&rsquo; +8&rsquo;, 16 ft wide<br /> <strong>Truss:</strong> Burr Arch 1 span<br /> <strong>Foundation: </strong>Concrete</p> <p><strong>Repair/Restoration History: </strong>Destroyed by flood in 1957. </p> <p><strong>Bridge History: </strong>The Moore Bridge&rsquo;s name was derived from the Moore Farm. Mr. Moore was known as a breeder of fine horses. William T. Moore rented 435 acres owned by J. E. Moore, about 3 miles from the Moore Bridge. Joseph A. Britton built the Philips Covered Bridge, #22, across Big Pond Creek the same year as he built the Moore Covered Bridge. </p> <p>The Moore Bridge was destroyed in the flood of 1957. Ths Weisner Bridge was destroyed in the same food. Concern over the loss of these bridges led to the first covered bridge festival. </p> <p>One of the last major Indian camps in Indiana was located northeast of Guion. The first settlement in the Guion area was in 1821 and consisted of five families on the south side of the present town. The railroads established the town by locating stations there at the crossing of the two rail lines in about 1872. The Evansville, Crawfordsville and Southern (Pumpkin Vine Railroad, Vandalia Railroad, Pennsylvania Railroad, and Penn Central) crossed beneath the Cincinnati, Hamilton, &amp; Dayton (Terre Haute, Logansport &amp; Indianapolis, Decatur &amp; Western, Baltimore &amp; Ohio, Chessie System, CSX). Guion was named tor William H. Guion. He was a well known businessman and a stockholder on the railroad. In 1897 the railroad built a new station and named it Guion. </p> <p>In 1927 the town included a hotel, store, blacksmith, post office, church, and a few residences. </p> <p>The Penn Central was abandoned in about 1970 after a track washout. The CSX trackage was abandoned in 1990 and a washout occurred soon thereafter.</p>
<p><strong>Built: </strong>1854 or 1859<br /> <strong>Builder:</strong> Henry Wolf <br /> <strong>Creek: </strong>Little Raccoon Creek <br /> <strong>Location:</strong> Located 3 miles east of Rockville, south of present US Highway 36 and south of Lee Allen Bryant Nursing Home. <br /> <strong>Reference Code:</strong> (#43) Adams 10-15N&mdash;8W<br /> <strong>Truss:</strong> Burr Arch 1 span<br /> <strong>Foundation:</strong> Stone<br /> <strong>Original Cost:</strong> $8,488</p> <p><strong>Repair/Restoration History:</strong> Repaired by Joseph J. Daniels in 1863. Damaged in 1875 flood. Repaired east abutment for $900 after much argument. Destroyed by 1913 flood. Replaced by Howard Bridge, built by Joseph A. Britton, in 1913.</p> <p><strong>Bridge History:</strong> The Plank Road was built between Rockville and Bellmore in about 1850. It was the first hard surface road in Parke County.</p> <p>Tree stumps and roots were removed along the road bed. An elevated grade was made by plowing and moving the dirt towards the center of the road. Three rows of sawed streamers were placed on the grade and 2 inch thick, 18 feet long oak planks were nailed crosswise to the streamers.</p> <p>A sawmill operated by Harmon Pulliam on the Harvey Adams farm sawed most of the wood for the first section. Another section from Bellmore to Hollandsburg was made of wood sawed by Absalom Sappenfield at his Fairplay Mill and hauled onto location by his three yokes of oxen.</p> <p>The Plank Road was toll road. In a few years, the planks decayed and were damaged beyond repair. They were removed, and the road was graveled. In about 1867 or 1877, the county commissioners purchased the company&rsquo;s stock and opened the road to free travel.</p> <p>This road became State Road 31 then US 36 and connected the Plank Road Bridge, Billie Creek Bridge, the Hollandsburg Bridge, and the Sim Smith Bridge.</p> <p>The road once extended from Indianapolis to the Wabash River. The last section of the planks was removed in the summer of 1931. The section was between the Rockville Water Works pumping station and Little Raccoon Creek. The ground there had been a swamp, and the 75 year old planks of oak and walnut were well preserved.</p> <p>There are several entries in Parke County Commissioners records referencing as many as three bridges on Plank Roads over Little Raccoon Creek. These covered bridges were contracted in 1854, 1856, and 1859, However, since the Plank Road was constructed and owned by a private toll road company until 1867, it is very possible that neither of the three may have been the subject bridge.</p> <p>The bridge at this site had a unique look. The opening was squared off in the Henry Wolf style but the roof face was rounded. The one picture of this bridge closely resembles the replacement Howard Bridge. An 1859 bridge cost $8,488, while an 1854 bridge had $1,000 paid in advance by the county, a $500 payment, and $1,200 paid to Henry Wolf upon completion.</p> <p>The bridge was repaired by J.J. Daniels in 1863. It was damaged again in the 1875 flood. The east abutment was repaired. After much argument and a delay, $900 was paid for these repairs. It was damaged in the 1913 flood and was replaced by the Howard Bridge</p>
<p><strong>Built: </strong>1880<br /> <strong>Builder: </strong>Joseph J. Daniels <br /> <strong>Creek:</strong> Big Raccoon Creek <br /> <strong>Location:</strong> Located 1 mile east of Rosedale. <br /> <strong>Reference Code: </strong>(#17), 14-61-08, 12-61-08, ce, Florida 25-14N&mdash;8W <br /> <strong>Size:</strong> 248 ft long +14&rsquo; +14&rsquo;, 16 ft wide, 13&rsquo; clearance<br /> <strong>Truss: </strong>Burr Arch 2 span<br /> <strong>Foundation:</strong> Cut stone<br /> <strong>Original Cost:</strong> $7,600</p> <p><strong>Repair/Restoration History:</strong> Damaged by arson fire October 1969. Repaired. Destroyed by arson fire October 13, 1976.</p> <p><strong>Bridge History: </strong>Also known as &quot;Newcombs Ford&quot; and &quot;Gallatin Mill&quot; </p> <p>Parke County Commissioners advertised for a bridge to be built at Newcombs Ford on March 10,1880. Bids were opened May 14, 1880. They included: Richard Epperson $8,700; and Daniels $7,600 plan #1, $7,300 plan #2. The Contract was awarded to Daniels, Plan #1. Final inspection was completed October 13, 1880. A mill once stood on the east side of the bridge along with a small village. The village was called Gallatin, named after Albert Gallatin, the Secretary of the Treasury in the Jefferson administration. </p> <p>Another writer found foundations of another mill upstream from the bridge. </p> <p>The name Red Bridge may have come from earlier years when it was unusual to paint covered bridges. Many early covered bridges that were painted were painted white. Traditionally, the ends of this bridge were painted red while the ends of other covered bridges were painted white to improve visibility. The bridge was damaged by an arson fire in 1969. William Hargrave, former publisher of the Rockville Republican, established the Covered Bridge Arson Reward Fund shortly thereafter. </p> <p>The Red Bridge was burned on October 13,1976. Three were charged with second degree arson and conspiracy to commit a felony. They were separately arrested by a State Police detective at a service station, by Parke County deputies at home, and by West Terre Haute police near another service station. They were arraigned before Judge Dowd on October 15, and their cases were continued to October 29. Each of the three defense attorneys had asked for a continuance. They requested time to study the charges and detailed information was requested. The continuance was granted over the objections of the prosecutor. In later actions the three were each released on $50,000 bonds, and the case was venued to Vermillion County and Judge Peter J Marietta. </p> <p>A campaign to collect funds to rebuild the Red Bridge was started by Torch Newspapers. Years later the Red Bridge has not been rebuilt or replaced. Only the three abutments remain. The road is closed at Little Raccoon Creek.</p>
<p><strong>Built: </strong>1863 (unconfirmed)<br /> <strong>Builder:</strong> Henry Wolf (unconfirmed) <br /> <strong>Creek:</strong> Roaring Creek <br /> <strong>Location:</strong> Located at Roaring Creek, now near US 41, east of present highway bridge. <br /> <strong>Reference Code:</strong> (#45) Penn 32-17N-7W <br /> <strong>Size: </strong>40-60 ft long</p> <p><strong>Repair/Restoration History:</strong> Removed in 1923-25 when US 41 was built. Second bridge at this location. </p> <p><strong>Bridge History:</strong> According to an early story about this Roaring Creek Crossing a group of young people set out from Bloomingdale in a wagon to visit Turkey Run in 1863. As they crossed the old open bridge, it collapsed sending all into the water below. A nearby mill dam kept the depth of the water below at six or seven feet. The team of horses drowned, but all of the passengers were saved. The story teller said it was probable that the hoop skirts of the ladies helped keep them afloat.</p> <p>References to the earlier open bridge and the replacement covered bridge have not been found in the Parke County Commissioners&rsquo; records. Information on the associated mill is also very limited. A photograph from 1912 shows a bicyclist at the Roaring Creek Bridge. The bridge appears to be 40 to 60 feet long and has a squared off portal of the Henry Wolf style.</p> <p>The Roaring Creek Bridge was removed and replaced between 1923 and 1925 as US Highway #41was constructed. The mill dam is still visible from the Highway 41 bridge.</p>
<p><strong>Built: </strong>1863 (unconfirmed)<br /> <strong>Builder:</strong> Henry Wolf (unconfirmed) <br /> <strong>Creek:</strong> Roaring Creek <br /> <strong>Location:</strong> Located at Roaring Creek, now near US 41, east of present highway bridge. <br /> <strong>Reference Code:</strong> (#45) Penn 32-17N-7W <br /> <strong>Size: </strong>40-60 ft long</p> <p><strong>Repair/Restoration History:</strong> Removed in 1923-25 when US 41 was built. Second bridge at this location. </p> <p><strong>Bridge History:</strong> According to an early story about this Roaring Creek Crossing a group of young people set out from Bloomingdale in a wagon to visit Turkey Run in 1863. As they crossed the old open bridge, it collapsed sending all into the water below. A nearby mill dam kept the depth of the water below at six or seven feet. The team of horses drowned, but all of the passengers were saved. The story teller said it was probable that the hoop skirts of the ladies helped keep them afloat.</p> <p>References to the earlier open bridge and the replacement covered bridge have not been found in the Parke County Commissioners&rsquo; records. Information on the associated mill is also very limited. A photograph from 1912 shows a bicyclist at the Roaring Creek Bridge. The bridge appears to be 40 to 60 feet long and has a squared off portal of the Henry Wolf style.</p> <p>The Roaring Creek Bridge was removed and replaced between 1923 and 1925 as US Highway #41was constructed. The mill dam is still visible from the Highway 41 bridge.</p>
<p><strong>Built:</strong> 1866<br /> <strong>Builder:</strong> Joseph J. Daniels <strong><br /> Creek:</strong> Big Raccoon Creek <strong><br /> Location:</strong> Located in Roseville or Coxville, north of Rosedale <br /> <strong>Reference Code: </strong>(#41), (#18b) Florida 15-14N&mdash;8W <strong><br /> Size: </strong>250 ft long<br /> <strong>Truss:</strong> Burr Arch 2 span<br /> <strong>Foundation: </strong>Cut stone<br /> <strong>Original Cost:</strong> $15,000 or $17,000 in two installments</p> <p><strong>Repair/Restoration History: </strong>Second bridge located at this site, first was present in 1849. Destroyed by arson fire in 1910. Photo courtesy of Jerry Newlin, taken at 1:20 a.m. by Dr. W.W. Wheat. </p> <p><strong>Bridge History:</strong> Joseph Walker settled in the area of Roseville in 1816. He built a log house and planted an orchard. Chauncy Rose settled in Roseville in 1819 when it was still part of Vigo County. He had come to Ft. Harrison to find new land. Captain Andrew Brooks showed Chauncy Rose a good mill site on Big Raccoon. Later, in January, 1821 when the legislature organized the county, it was located in Parke County. The mill was a grist mill and was essential for the pioneer way of life. With customers traveling long hard distances it was a center of commerce. A sawmill and workers cabins were constructed. With the demand, a second mill was erected and run by Dan Kiblar. The first store was run by Moses Robbins, also known as &quot;Old Mohawk&quot; and &quot;Uncle Moses&quot;. In 1820 a tanyard was established 1/4 mile south of the flour mill but only operated two years.</p> <p>Later, two distillaries were built to convert corn for shipment to New Orleans on flatboats. By 1825 Robbins and Wedding had a flourishing pork packing business for transport to the south. Moses Robbins&rsquo;sawmill was used to saw the wood for the first courthouse. The first session of court in Parke County was held here and the first grand jury. In the 1830&rsquo;s the county seat was moved to Armiesburg and eventually to Rockville.</p> <p>A glass sand company was established by W. D. Evans on June 29,1896 to crush sandstone for sand to make glass. The business did not do well and under new management, burned down on August 25,1899. </p> <p>Coxville was an adjacent hamlet on the western high flatlands. Another source claims the town was renamed Coxville by the Brazil Block Coal Company because a Mr. Cox leased extensive areas of coal rights. The first post office and the train station were called Coxville. While many began calling the entire area by that name, the county commissioners passed an ordinance and continued to refer to the area as Roseville from the 1880&rsquo;s to the 1930&rsquo;s. </p> <p>The first Roseville mines were established in the 1870&rsquo;s. Throughout Parke County, families began mining the easily accessible coal for their own use. Several mine openings are located on the hill slope opposite of the Roseville Covered Bridge. These dangerous openings were to slope mines and have been covered with rock. </p> <p>In 1872 Joseph Martin of Brazil purchased the Zeke Holden slope mine. He improved the mine, built a narrow gauge railway to the railroad right of way, and began selling coal to farmers, merchants, and blacksmiths. Mining went full scale with coal hauled on the railroad along the Big Raccoon. On September 7, 1865, the Parke County Commissioners ordered engineering plans for a Roseville Bridge from J.J. Daniels. Bids were requested, and after the bid opening on October 4, 1865, the contract was awarded to J.J. Daniels for $15,000. It was completed, September, 1866. The bridge was constructed the same year as the Harrison Bridge.</p> <p>This bridge was the only bridge in the county with fire insurance. However, insurance had long expired at the time of the fire. </p> <p>In 1910, Roseville was in a new period of prosperity. The sand plant was in operation northwest of the bridge and many local mines were in full production. The steep hillsides were lined with hotels, saloons, and stores. Most had been hastily built in boomtown style. The first floors were set against the hillside and built on stilt like pilings. Long flights of stairs from the road were needed to reach the first floors. Four passenger trains and sixteen freight or coal trains passed through Roseville each day. The large population required regular shipments of food, clothing, and hardware. </p> <p>The sand plant produced the materials used in the first Coca Cola bottles designed and produced by Root&rsquo;s Glass Plant in Terre Haute. (The drink was invented in Atlanta, Georgia years earlier.) The Roseville sand gave the first Coke bottles their distinctive green color. Operation of the heavy sandstone crushing machinery and the green glass hue led to the closing of the plant. </p> <p>Saturday, April 9, 1910, was a bad day for Coxville and its two arsonists. They started the day at the glass sand plant near the bridge. The younger, 22, arrived surly, argued with the foreman, and was fired. The other, 25, walked off the job with him. They went to a local illegal &quot;blind tiger&quot; to drink. About 11 PM, the night watchman at the sand plant discovered a fire on the roof. He and several others were able to put it out and found an oil soaked rag had been thrown to start it. After midnight the firemen started home but then saw the bridge on fire. It was too far gone to save it. There were some alleged tracks but the pair&rsquo;s attitude at the fire focused attention on them.</p> <p>The sheriff was not available, so a deputy started the investigation. He deputized another, and Blake Gloss drove them from Rockville to Coxville. Acting on reports, the younger was arrested. The older was not home. There was a report he was walking toward Rosedale. The deputy started that way, but the arsonist changed his mind and turned around back toward home. He was recognized as he passed the ruins. When the assistant deputy started chasing him, he ran down the railroad track but was caught. They were taken to the county jail in Rockville after noon on Sunday. They confessed on Monday. A few weeks later they were sentenced to 2-21 year terms at the State Reformatory at Jeffersonville. </p> <p>Apparently the two perpetrators were unrepentant. While in the Rockville jail, they composed a ballad. Only the first stanza is remembered: &quot;We first set fire to the sand plant. And went on up the ridge. And it didn&rsquo;t prove successful. So we went and burned the bridge.&quot;&nbsp; </p>
<p><strong>Built:</strong> 1861<br /> <strong>Builder:</strong> Joseph J. Daniels, contracted by W.D. Daniels <br /> <strong>Creek: </strong>Sugar Creek <br /> <strong>Location: </strong>Located north of West Union but probably not same location as West Union Bridge. <br /> <strong>Reference Code:</strong> (#52) Reserve 6-16N&mdash;8W <br /> <strong>Size:</strong> approx. 250 ft long<br /> <strong>Truss: </strong>Burr Arch 2 span (unconfirmed)<br /> <strong>Foundation:</strong> Hewn stone<br /> <strong>Original Cost:</strong> $8,000 County + $2,747 subscriptions</p> <p><strong>Repair/Restoration History:</strong> Inspected and rods tightened in 1863 by J.J. Daniels. Destroyed by flood in 1866. J.J. Daniels was paid $286.66 to remove the materials from the creek. Replaced by Harrison Bridge (#2) in 1866 and the West Union Bridge in 1876.</p> <p><strong>Bridge History:</strong> West Union was first settled in 1822 by John Beard, the Linebargers, Browns, Mellekins, and Jorias Horgar. It was first called &quot;The Linebarger Settlement&quot;. John Beard built a grist mill on Sugar Creek in 1822. It was a log mill and with sharpened burrs could grind about three bushels of corn per hour. The first mill was replaced in 1836 by Robert Manwaring &amp; Son and was called Manwaring&rsquo;s Mill. Later it was owned by Prior Wright but operated by Zachariah Beard. The building was destroyed by a tornado and was not rebuilt. </p> <p>Jeremiah H. Silar platted the town of West Union on February 18,1837. The 62 lots were located in the now almost empty triangle formed by the roads about a half mile south of Sugar Creek. A three room brick school house was built in the large triangle shaped lot at the north of the town. The Post Office was called Delta. Others records show that a West Union Post Office was open from November 3, 1886 to May 31, 1932. </p> <p>West Union was another flat boat shipping point and was later on the Indiana Coal Railroad or the Brazil Division of the C&amp;EI Railroad. When prosperous it contained a hotel, cooper shop, two blacksmiths, two shoe shops, two general stores, pork packer, railroad depot, elevator, post office, stockyards, telephone switchboard, and gas station. </p> <p>In 1859, the Parke County Commissioners received a letter from Joseph J. Daniels, acting as an agent for William D. Daniels, his brother, seeking a contract to build bridges over Sugar Creek at Star Mills and Rockport. </p> <p>A special Parke County Commissioners Meeting was called on December 28,1860 by Dr. Hobbs for several citizens to present a petition for a covered bridge at Rockport. At the same meeting John Scott presented a petition and subscriptions for a bridge at Star Mills. </p> <p>At a special session on January 1, 1861, the Commissioners approved $8,000 for each location provided the citizens would provide subscriptions to pay for the total cost. James Johnson and Henry Wolf were appointed to select locations for the bridges and give specifications and cost. </p> <p>In the summer of 1861, $2,747.00 was raised for the West Union site, with eight men agreeing to make up the difference to $8,000. For the Rockport site, $3,037 was raised, with six men agreeing to make the difference to $8,000. The contract was awarded to William D. Daniels with the provision they must be completed in 1861. </p> <p>The bridge was called the Harrison Bridge in honor of President, Territorial Governor, and General William Henry Harrison and in contrast to the &quot;sister&quot; Jackson Bridge named after President Andrew Jackson. There are no available photographs of the Star Mills Bridge.</p> <p>Although this bridge probably had the same design and was tied down like the Jackson Bridge, upstream, it did not withstand the flood of 1866.</p>
<p><strong>Built:</strong> 1865, 1866, or 1884<br /> <strong>Builder:</strong> Joseph J. Daniels (unconfirmed) <br /> <strong>Creek:</strong> Turkey Run Creek <br /> <strong>Location: </strong>Located in Turkey Run State Park between the Log Church and the Turkey Run Inn. <br /> <strong>Reference Code:</strong> (#48) 28-17N&mdash;7W <br /> <strong>Size:</strong> 50 ft long<br /> <strong>Truss: </strong>Queen post (unconfirmed)<br /> <strong>Foundation: </strong>Cut stone</p> <p><strong>Repair/Restoration History:</strong> Replaced by concrete Bridge in 1914 by the Parke County Commissioners. The abutments are still in place. The road was used for State Road 49 until it was moved to the present State Road 47 Road Bed.</p> <p><strong>Bridge History:</strong> Also known as &quot;Turkey Run Hollow Bridge&quot; </p> <p>George E. Gould states that the Turkey Run Hollow Bridge was built in 1866 by Joseph J. Daniels. Another source contends the bridge was built in 1884. The photograph clearly shows a Britton Portal with a flat top and corners angled at 130 degrees. The picture poses the possibility of a second bridge built here in 1884 by J.A. Britton or that he made extensive repairs. </p> <p>Turkey Run was named for flocks of wild turkeys which nested there. &quot;Run&quot; is another name for a creek. </p> <p>The legend of the naming of Turkey Run goes back to the original settlers. Captain Garland had visited the Sugar Creek area in early 1811 while prospecting- He was in Vincennes when the expedition against Prophet&rsquo;s Town was planned. He volunteered and was assigned to Major Davies&rsquo;s Mounted Rangers. He returned to Sugar Creek scouting a route to the battle ground. The gorge which became Turkey Run is said to have reminded him of his home in the Virginia mountains, Captain Garland was rewarded with a land grant in 1825 and returned to Sugar Creek to build a home. Sugar Creek froze over on December 15 as &quot;slick as glass&quot;. The settlers discussed how the wolves had eaten every animal that could not climb a tree. Captain Garland and his son, Ned, hunted for turkey on Christmas Eve. They had hunted more than 3 miles from home, past the &quot;breaks&quot; of Mill Creek, and were unsuccessful. </p> <p>Ned was a good target shooter with the flintlock but could not seem to aim when shooting at game. When Captain Garland had to return home for evening chores, Ned wanted to continue hunting up the creek. He was told not to go past The Narrows. A snow had started and by a quarter of a mile up the creek it was two inches deep on the ice. Then he saw a flock of turkeys fly across the valley one by one to a hiding place. He quietly stalked the turkeys into a deep ravine. There it was warmer, the snow was not sticking, and it was protected from the wind, A great gobbler flew in, landed, and stood still. This time he aimed at a solid target against evergreen and snow. He hit his mark. </p> <p>The protected valley was a secure warm home for the turkeys. He walked up the run or stream. He took the left fork and became sweaty carrying the big bird in the warmer air. When he climbed out of the gulch, he realized he was lost. He looked around wondering which way to go. Then he heard a cow bell. He soon found &quot;old Betsy,&quot; and she led him home with the turkey on her back. </p> <p>The Captain asked Ned where he had finally found their Christmas dinner. As Ned described the place, Captain Garland told of skirting around it going to the Narrows for General Harrison. Ned called it Turkey Run and the name was established.</p>
<p><strong>Built:</strong> 1851<br /> <strong>Builder:</strong> Joseph J. Daniels <br /> <strong>Creek: </strong>Big Raccoon Creek <br /> <strong>Location:</strong> Located west of Hollandsburg on old US 36 roadbed. <br /> <strong>Reference Code: </strong>(#46b) Union 10-15N&mdash;6W<br /> <strong>Truss: </strong>Burr Arch 1 span<br /> <strong>Foundation:</strong> Stone</p> <p><strong>Repair/Restoration History: </strong>The site is now covered by Lake Mansfield, south of the existing US 36 bridge. Replaced by Hollandsburg Bridge in 1872.</p> <p><strong>Bridge History: </strong>Also known as &quot;Hollandsburg Bridge #1&quot; </p> <p>Joseph J. Daniels was called to Parke County in 1851 to construct the Union Township Bridge. This was several years before he moved to Rockville. He prepared plans and preliminary estimates for the Clinton Bridge that same year but the contract was awarded to the Bishop family in 1852. </p> <p>J.J. Daniels constructed the Hargrave Bridge, in 1847. It, the Union Township Bridge, and repairs and modifications to other Plank Road Bridges all occurred before his famous Jackson Bridge, in 1861. Some writers have claimed this bridge was a railroad bridge, based on J.J, Daniels&rsquo;s activities as a railroad bridge builder at the time. While no photographs exist, it is believed that this bridge looked like the Jackson Bridge, and the Hargrave Bridge of 1847. </p> <p>This bridge was on the Plank Road route from Montezuma to Indianapolis and was probably built for the owners of the Plank Road-The planks soon rotted and broke, making the road rough and difficult to travel. It was sold to the Parke County Commissioners who converted it to free travel, removed most sections of broken planks, and eventually graveled the surface.</p>
<p><strong>Built: </strong>1908<br /> <strong>Builder:</strong> Joseph A. Britton <br /> <strong>Creek: </strong>Weisner Creek (was called Weisner&rsquo;s Brook) <br /> <strong>Location:</strong> Located on Fisher&rsquo;s Road and 1 1/2 miles southwest of Catlin. <br /> <strong>Reference Code:</strong> (#40), 12-61-12, ds, Florida 2-14N&mdash;8W <br /> <strong>Size: </strong>43 feet long +10- +10&rsquo;, 16 feet wide<br /> <strong>Truss:</strong> King Post (no arch) 1 span<br /> <strong>Foundation: </strong>Poured concrete</p> <p><strong>Repair/Restoration History: </strong>Destroyed by flood in 1957. Wood bridge on concrete abutments was replaced by concrete bridge on wood abutments in 1960. </p> <p><strong>Bridge History:</strong> The Weisner Bridge was built the same year and by the same builder as the nearby Zacke Cox and Harry Evans Covered Bridges. This bridge was without an arch, in contrast with the other two because it was shorter. For one year it was the shortest county owned bridge. The Philips Bridge was built the following year. The Weisner was the prototype for the Philips, also without an arch, and they were tied for shortest until Weisner was washed away in 1957. </p> <p>One source claimed a second covered bridge over Weisner Creek existed during the 1930&rsquo;s. During the construction of the Weisner Bridge, there was quicksand all along the creek bed. Teams of wagons bogged down in the sand. After these incidents, small herds of cattle were led back and forth across the sand to pack it down and make it firm enough to support horses and wagons. </p> <p>The Weisner Bridge was washed away during the flood of 1957. A small dam above the bridge gave away during the massive rainstorm. As the Weisner valley filled with water, washing away the bridge, the residents in the nearby house feared that the rising water would sweep it away too. A larger flood control dam has been constructed by the Corps of Engineers upstream from the Weisner Bridge site. However, one study of the newer dam and bridge is reported to state that if this dam collapsed, the flood would sweep down the Little Raccoon valley and damage houses in Jessup. </p> <p>The Moore Covered Bridge was also destroyed in the 1957 flood. The Pleasant Valley Iron Bridge was overloaded and destroyed by a truck the same year. Replacement of these bridges and repairs to smaller bridges placed a serious economic burden on Parke County. This was a time of economic downturn in the county. As a result of the search for new county income and concern over the loss of the county&rsquo;s unique covered bridges, the first Covered Bridge Festival was organized. </p> <p>The future site of the Weisner Covered Bridge was once owned by Hirem Catlin for whom the town and covered bridge were named. The property transfer from Joel Wesley Catlin was recorded before Justice of the Peace John C. Gilkeson, owner of the future Nevins Covered Bridge site.</p>
<p><strong><br /> </strong></p>
<p>The &quot;Old Jail Inn Parke County&quot; has nine rooms available with themed rooms</p> <p>Amenities: &nbsp;2 suites with their own bathroom, 2 rooms share one bath, another 5 rooms share 1 bathroom.</p>
<p><strong>Open All Year- Adult Only Getaway<br /> </strong></p> <p>1889 Queen Anne home nestled in Rockville’s Historic District. You are immediately surrounded by spacious rooms, high ceilings, natural woodwork, pocket doors, and fireplaces, not to mention the lace-covered windows and hometown hospitality. You will feel regal as you climb the stately staircase to second floor guest rooms.</p> <p>Amenities: Delicious full breakfast served, cable, central air, gift certificates, non-smoking rooms.</p> <p>Contact: Tulie Ann Jadzak</p> <p> </p>
<p>Unique Parke County 100+ year old home fully furnished with AC, washer/dryer, cable TV, linens,&nbsp; all appliances.&nbsp;&nbsp; NO SMOKING &amp; NO PETS.&nbsp; &nbsp;Available all year and easily accessed.&nbsp;</p>
<div><span style="font-size: x-small">Turkey Hill Farm Antiques &amp; Uniques is located 1 mile east and south of Turkey Run State Park on Marshall Road.&nbsp; Northern Parke County's largest shop with 3 buildings located down an old coutnry lane...a 9-room 1856 farmhouse, chicken shed, and garage full of treasures.</span></div>
<p>Kevin Smith</p> <p>Come out during the Maple Syrup Festival and watch how the maple syrup is made and packaged. Stop in at our store, located on the back porch of the big white house, to purchase your pure maple syrup and other goodies all year around!</p>
Open April through October--Subs, Pizza, Homemade Breadsticks, Wraps, Tacos, Salads, Milkshakes, Pie. Located across form Turkey Run State Park Campground--1 mile east of Junction US 41 and SR 47.  
<p>Open Tuesday-Sunday&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Tuesday-Saturday&nbsp; 11am to 8 pm</p> <p>Sunday 11:30 am to 3 pm&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; (Buffet Only)</p> <p>Call ahead for Reservations, and Take-out Orders</p> <p>facebook.com/UnderTheArch</p>
Located in beautiful Parke County, Indiana, Covered Bridge Capitol of the World, adjacent to Turkey Run State Parke. Private guest cabins in a rustic setting with all the modern conveniences. Amenities: Air conditioning, heat, satellite tv, dvd players, refrigerators/freezers, microwaves, coffee makers, BBQ grill, picnic tables.  
<p>Country Farmers Market</p> <p>Open Saturdays only from 8:30 am - 5:00 pm.</p>
Pizza
<p>A must see you don't want to miss in the heart of covered bridge Parke County, Indiana. We feature an array of amazing handcrafted furniture, repurposed gems, antiques, collectibles, primitives, tools, and many must haves! Over 50 years of experience brings this store a lot of character. Great for the Picker at heart!&nbsp;</p> <p>&quot;Like&quot; us on <a href="https://www.facebook.com/pages/Finders-Keepers/444883555576370?id=444883555576370&amp;sk=photos_stream">Facebook</a>!</p>
<p><span style="background-color: rgb(237, 237, 217); font-family: Georgia, 'Times New Roman', Times, serif;">Enjoy country elegance and comfortable lodgings at Grannys Farm Bed and Breakfast, located 2 miles east of Turkey Run State Park in the heart of scenic Parke County, Indiana, the &quot;Covered Bridge Capital of the World&quot;.Granny's Farm has been a landmark site in northern Parke County for more than a century. With the opening of Granny's Farmhouse in 2008,a variety of convenient lodging arrangements is now available.Both houses on Granny's Farm offer panoramic views of the 160-acre farmstead, including a pond and woods. Each day on Grannys Farm starts with an assortment of cereals, fresh fruit, and coffee - a nice way to welcome the new day. Whether you are enjoying a weekend away from the city or organizing a family reunion, you will find that Granny's Farm offers a variety of accommodations to suit your needs.</span></p> <p style="margin-bottom: 1em; font-family: Georgia, 'Times New Roman', Times, serif; background-color: rgb(237, 237, 217);"><o:p></o:p></p> <p style="margin-bottom: 1em; font-family: Georgia, 'Times New Roman', Times, serif; background-color: rgb(237, 237, 217);">Amenities: Whirlpool. Continental Breakfast. No pets allowed.<o:p></o:p></p> <p style="margin-bottom: 1em; font-family: Georgia, 'Times New Roman', Times, serif; background-color: rgb(237, 237, 217);">&nbsp;</p> <p style="margin-bottom: 1em; font-family: Georgia, 'Times New Roman', Times, serif; background-color: rgb(237, 237, 217);">&nbsp;</p>
<p>We will carry a wide variety of products to meet your needs, such as bulk and bagged mulch, bagged potting soil and compost, a variety of flower pots and bird houses, OREGON chainsaw parts (bars, chains, etc.), home decor, jewelry, furniture, and so much more!&nbsp;</p>
<p>&nbsp;Antiques on York:&nbsp;<span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: Helvetica, Arial, 'lucida grande', tahoma, verdana, arial, sans-serif; line-height: 15.359999656677246px;">We are a 4500 square foot mall with a combination of antiques, primatives, re-purposed items, and unique collectables and crafts.&nbsp;</span></p>
<p><span style="font-family: inherit; font-size: 14px; line-height: 21px; white-space: pre-wrap;">Come visit us and check out our lovely B&amp;B and quaint comfy rooms. Each room is personally decorated. </span><span style="font-family: inherit; font-size: 14px; line-height: 21px; white-space: pre-wrap;">Nestled in the heart of Parke County, our B&amp;B is perfectly located for a trip to Turkey Run State Park or a visit to several covered bridges. Only a few miles away you have the Raccoon State Park and The Rockville Lake known for its great fishing and fun. </span><span style="font-family: inherit; font-size: 14px; line-height: 21px; white-space: pre-wrap;">Country styling and just two blocks form the heart of town. Parke County is the heart of the covered bridges and so much more. A great place to come and wander and discover. Come visit us soon!</span></p>
<p>&nbsp;&quot;Have 3 mobile homes for rent during the Covered Bridge Festival. They are all 2 bedroom and completely furnished. Just 5 mins away from Mansfield, 10 mins from Rockville, and 15 mins from Bridgeton. Travel trailer sites open as well during the Covered Bridge Festival. Call Sandy at 765-592-1285 for more infomation. &quot;</p>
The Dragonfly is a 3 bedroom, 3 bath, 2 guesthouse one block off the square in Rockville. Home has a full kitchen, living room, sitting room, dining area, laundry room and the 2 car attached garage is setup as a craft room (can also serve as secure motorcycle parking). Perfect for the weekend scrapbooking parties, pinterest parties, quilters, fiber artist, wedding parties, hunters, etc......anyone looking to rent for 3+ nights. 3 night stay $750 + tax Weekly rate $1,300 + tax. Call Laura for reservations 765-592-0393 Check out our Facebook page "The Dragonfly" to see craft parties that are hosted by the owner. All supplies provided, anywhere from 1 - 3 items made per class. Prices vary per class.
Mexican Cuisine
Deli
Resturant
Dairy Queen
Family Dollar
Dollar General- Montezuma
Turkey Run State Park offers interpretive naturalist services all year long. Scheduled programs include hikes, planetarium programs, history talks, a junior naturalist program, and evening programs. Special groups wishing programs just for their group should call in advance for this free service. Inquire at the Nature Center, Inn or Park Office. The Nature Center is open year round and can be reached by phone at (765) 597-2654. General hours of operation vary, and the hours are listed below. Keep in mind that there may be some rare, random days that the Nature Center is closed when it would normally be open.
A unique store of urban industrial with a country flair. Owner, licensed designer Rachel Engel, creates an outstanding shopping experience.
WATERFRONT apartments with easy access down to the lake, including a floating dock to park your boat. Each apartment rents by the weekend, week, month, or seasonal. All expenses paid (utilities, taxes, mowing, trash removal, road fees, dock fees, etc…). Perfect setup to just come down and enjoy the lake! Each apartment has 2 bedrooms (full or queen size bed in one bedroom and 2 single beds in the 2nd bedroom) 1 bath, full kitchen, living/dining area, satellite, and a covered porch overlooking the lake. Bedding and towels provided. Rooms available for Covered Bridge, 12 miles to Rockville Square, 9 miles to Mansfield, and 16 miles to Bridgeton. For more information or to book a room call Laura @ 765-592-0393
Gobbler's Knob Cabins Just 2 miles from the entrance to Turkey Run State Park, these cute cabins are the perfect getaway! For cabin information call 812-236-4132 or visit www.gobblersknobcabins.com
Antique Mall filled with: Antiques, Collectibles, Advertising, Vintage, Retro, Shabby Chic, Primitives, Jewelry, Glassware, and More!
Back to Basics is a gift shop in Parke County that sells only handcrafted items and art work from local artist/crafters. Open Tuesday-Sunday 8am-6pm Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Backtobasicsrockville/
Local bakery and Cafe providing dine in, carryout and delivery! Delicious items such as muffins, cupcakes, bread and pies as well as a variety of Hot Foods
A variety of Rustic, Primitive, and Antique Home Decor. Also handmade crafts and refurbished items. We custom paint furniture and handmade signs.